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Working with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

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  • 1. Working with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PETER CHRISTENSEN Manager, Technology Commercialization Drive Oregon, June 11, 2014 PNNL-SA-103325
  • 2. DOE’s National Laboratories are solving America’s toughest challenges 2
  • 3. Expanding campus, growing capabilities
  • 4. 4,200+ staff, 1,000+ PhDs $936M billion business volume in FY13 93% federal, 7% industrial More than 50% homeland and national security 2,247 U.S. and Foreign Patents as of FY13 (invention per day, patent per week) 89 R&D 100 Awards – The Oscars of Invention 75 Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Awards for Excellence in Technology Transfer Over the years, our portfolio has diversified and grown … and been recognized
  • 5. Powerful combination of core capabilities June 19, 2014 5 Powerful combination of core capabilities 5 • World-class technical staff • State-of-the-art equipment • Mission-ready facilities
  • 6. Smart Grid with Smart Chargers Can Deliver the Electricity for Millions of PHEVs
  • 7. PNNL Grid-Friendly Charger Controller With communications as part of the AGC control Provision of regulation services to minimize ACE Requires high update rates via SCADA network Without communications Based on frequency deviations from nominal AC frequency Provision of frequency bias portion of ACE Extremely low-cost June 19, 2014 7
  • 8. 8 V2G½: Load can provide regulation services V2G • provides regulation service as a load and generator • requires charging and discharging according to grid operators signal Max. charging (7.2 kW = 240V*30A) Max. discharging (-7.2 kW) chargingdischarging Capacity value (-7.2 to 7.2=14.4kW) Max. charging (7.2 kW) Attribute of “V2G½”: • provides regulation service with ½ the capacity value of V2G • however, less than half the cost because • no interconnection gear with grid necessary because no electricity goes back into grid • removes any uncertainties regarding battery life reduction because of extra cycling Max. discharging (-7.2 kW) chargingdischarging Capacity value (0 to 7.2=7.2 kW) V2G½ • provides regulation service as a load only • requires only charging • modulates charging Never discharge !
  • 9. Regulation Services as a Load during Charging June 19, 2014 9 PJM allows loads to provide regulation services 3.6kW (240V/15A) 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% 80.0% 90.0% 100.0% 0 3,600 7,200 10,800 14,400 18,000 SOC Battery State-of-Charge 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 0 3600 7200 10800 14400 18000 time in [sec] MW ISO Regulation Signal 1 hour 1 hour 600,00 vehicles would provide 500 MW of regulation services (0.8 kW per vehicle diversified)
  • 10. Doing Business with PNNL June 19, 2014 1010 10 CRADA • Cost share with DOE • Option to exclusive rights to foreground IP WFO • Fund research • Keep the IP • Mostly non- negotiable terms ACT • Fund research • Negotiate IP • More flexible in some terms Direct Licensing of Existing IP • Patents and technologies available for licensing
  • 11. Example of successful licensing of PNNL IP High-resolution radar imaging technology to rapidly scan for potential threats that would not be picked up by traditional metal detectors in airports. Same technology serves the apparel industry, taking customer measurements to help make tailored clothing. June 19, 2014 11
  • 12. Example of successful licensing of PNNL IP PNNL spin-out company for grid- scale (vanadium redox) flow batteries using novel electrolyte chemistry Helps to enable renewable power generation Firm based in Mukilteo, WA One of two licenses to battery manufacturers, in additional to three licenses to electrolyte producers. 12
  • 13. Sponsored Research Funding Models June 19, 2014 13 Federal Funds PNNL 3rd Party Federal Funds PNNL 3rd Party Subcontract Non-Federal Funds PNNL 3rd Party CRADA / WFO / ACT Federal Funds PNNL 3rd Party Funds/In-Kind CRADA Federal Funds PNNL 3rd Party CRADA / WFO
  • 14. Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Research at PNNL funded jointly by sponsor and DOE Must be aligned with DOE mission – support required from cognizant DOE program manager, and scope approved by DOE site office Sponsor’s cost share can include in-kind, e.g., prototypes, labor, etc. Commercial terms somewhat negotiable, but standard template from DOE has many essentially non-negotiable terms IP: Sponsor gets an option to an exclusive license to generated IP within a specific field of use (royalty terms can be bracketed) Data: Incoming data can be protected, but generated data can only be protected for five years Starting point: Develop scope of work with PNNL June 19, 2014 14
  • 15. Work for Others (WFO) Research at PNNL fully funded by sponsor PNNL cannot compete with the private sector, so work must relate to unique PNNL capability or expertise Terms are largely non-negotiable Ninety day up front payment required Sponsor indemnifies lab and government Time and materials basis only IP: Sponsor owns all generated IP (given DOE reporting requirements, some sponsors choose to let Battelle own IP and then grant exclusive license or use option) Data: Sponsor can own and protect all generated data Starting point: Develop scope of work with PNNL June 19, 2014 15
  • 16. Agreement to Commercialize Technology (ACT) Research at PNNL fully funded by sponsor ACT is a pilot program at nine DOE laboratories Battelle steps in between sponsor and DOE to absorb some risk in exchange for a slightly higher fee Terms are more negotiable No up front fee required (payment negotiable) Indemnity clauses are negotiable (Battelle can assume some risk) Deliverables are negotiable, i.e., performance requirements IP: Largely negotiable – most often Battelle takes title and grants exclusive license in field of use, allowing Battelle to license in unrelated fields of use Data: Sponsor can own and protect all generated data Starting point: Develop scope of work with PNNL June 19, 2014 16
  • 17. Agreement Use Funding Subject Inventions GeneratedData U.S. Competitiveness Cost Highlights Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Collaborative research between DOE Labs and public and/or private entities for the mutual benefit of the parties Private and/or Federal funds Lab and Participant may elect their own inventions and Participant has right to negotiate exclusive license to Lab inventions Protected for up to 5 years Products embodying IP resulting from CRADA shall be manufactured substantially in the U.S. Lab and Participant may share costs or Participant pays 100% funds-in  Collaborative research  5 year data protection  Designed for multi-party collaborative research Work for Others (WFO) Work for businesses and other non-federal entities using highly specialized or unique DOE facilities, services or technical expertise Private funds Sponsor may elect title to Subject Inventions1 Protected as Sponsor’s proprietary data w/limited exceptions1,2,3 U.S. Preference: Sponsor agrees not to grant any party exclusive right to use or sell products embodying Subject Inventions in the U.S. unless products are manufactured substantially in the U.S. Sponsor pays full cost recovery  Sponsor typically retains right to elect title to subject inventions  Generated data treated as proprietary Option for limited Gov. R&D license3 Federal funds Lab may elect title to Subject Inventions of the Lab Unlimited Gov. rights U.S. Preference (see above) Sponsor pays full cost recovery  Access to unique facilities and expertise using federal funds Agreements for Commercializing Technology (ACT) Work for businesses and other non-federal entities using highly specialized or unique DOE facilities, services or technical expertise Private funds Initial title to the designated IP Lead. (ACT Participant or Lab Contractor) Protected as proprietary data w/limited exceptions1,2,3 U.S. Preference (see above) Participant pays full cost recovery plus additional negotiated compensation to the Contractor Flexibility for addressing indemnity & adv. payment  Negotiable IP terms Optional performance guarantee Option for limited Gov. R&D license3 Proprietary User Agreement4 User may access designated facilities to conduct its own proprietary research Private funds User may elect title to its Subject Inventions User may protect as proprietary n/a User pays approved user rate Generated data treated as proprietary Merit based access to unique facilities Non-Proprietary User Agreement4 Non-proprietary research at designated facilities n/a Lab and User may elect their own Subject Inventions Unlimited Gov. Rights U.S. Preference (see above) Each party covers own cost Merit based access to unique facilities Technology Transfer Mechanisms at DOE Facilities 1 Certain exceptions or restrictions may apply (e.g. foreign WFO Sponsors may be granted the right to elect title to inventions and receive proprietary data protection but only after the approval of DOE field patent counsel and concurrence from the cognizant DOE program office).2 Proprietary data protection may not be available at all facilities. 3 If the limited Gov. R&D license is utilized, data protection will be limited to 5 years. 4 User Agreements are only available when the Sponsor/Participant/User is proposing to use a DOE Designated User Facility that offers such agreements. (see, http://technologytransfer.energy.gov/docs/designateduserfacilities.html) rev. 9.24.2012 Certification: The Lab provided this DOE technology transfer matrix and explained all the options available including the availability of WFO agreements and CRADAs. The Lab has also disclosed in writing the relative cost differential between performing the proposed scope of work under ACT, a non-federal WFO agreement, and a CRADA (including any additional compensation to the Contractor under ACT). By: _______________________ (Sponsor/Participant/User Name) Signature: _______________________ Date: _________________ Survey Question: Why did you chose the selected mechanism for this project? ______________________ _
  • 18. Portfolio Alignment June 19, 2014 18 Gordon Graff • Energy Storage (grid, non-grid) Dave Greenslade • Sensors • Mechanical/electrical devices • Microtechnology • Nuclear (including radiochemical processing, isotopes and power generation) • Environmental • Manufacturing
  • 19. Portfolio Alignment June 19, 2014 19 Eric Lund • Biofuels, bio-based chemicals • Chemistry (including hydrogen generation) • Materials (including magnetics, lightweight materials) • Catalysts • Carbon Capture and Sequestration Ron Thomas • Biomedical • Bio-based Chemicals & Fuels (biology) • Biotechnology • Bioinformatics • Fuel cells
  • 20. Portfolio Alignment June 19, 2014 20 Bruce Harrer • Analytical Instruments • Millimeter Wave • Coatings/Films • Energy Conversion (solar, geothermal, fossil, thermoelectric; not including nuclear) Jennifer Hodas • Electricity Infrastructure (including analytics, demand response) • Energy Efficiency (including buildings technology Matt Love • Information Technologies • Software licensing • OSL

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