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Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
Frozen
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Frozen

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  • 1. Emma Buck
  • 2. whose idea the film was and where did it come from? In 1943, Walt Disney and Samuel Goldwyn had considered the possibility of collaborating to produce a biography film of author and poet Hans Christian Andersen, where Goldwyn's studio would shoot the live-action sequences of Andersen's life and Disney would create the animated sequences. The animated sequences were to include stories of Andersen's works, such as The Little Mermaid, The Little Match Girl, The Steadfast Tin Soldier, The Snow Queen, Thumbelina, The Ugly Duckling, The Red Shoes, and The Emperor's New Clothes. Disney and his animators encountered difficulty with The Snow Queen, as they could not find a way to adapt and relate the Snow Queen character to modern audiences. Even as far back as the 1940s, Disney's animation department saw great cinematic possibilities with the source material, but the Snow Queen character proved to be too problematic. This, among other things, led to the cancellation of the Disney-Goldwyn project. Goldwyn went on to produce his own live-action film version in 1952, entitled Hans Christian Andersen, with Danny Kaye as Andersen, Charles Vidor directing, Moss Hart writing, and Frank Loesser penning the songs. All of Andersen's fairy tales were, instead, told in song and ballet in live-action, like the rest of the film. It went on to receive six Academy Award nominations the following year. Back at Disney, The Snow Queen, along with other Andersen fairy tales (including The Little Mermaid), were shelved.
  • 3. "Hans Christian Andersen’s original version of The Snow Queen is a pretty dark tale and it doesn't translate easily into a film. For us the breakthrough came when we tried to give really human qualities to the Snow Queen. When we decided to make the Snow Queen Elsa and our protagonist Anna sisters, that gave a way to relate to the characters in a way that conveyed what each was going through and that would relate for today's audiences. This film has a lot of complicated characters and complicated relationships in it. There are times when Elsa does villainous things but because you understand where it comes from, from this desire to defend herself, you can always relate to her. 'Inspired by' means exactly that. There is snow and there is ice and there is a Queen, but other than that, we depart from it quite a bit. We do try to bring scope and the scale that you would expect but do it in a way that we can understand the characters and relate to them." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frozen_(2013_film)
  • 4. Genre • Frozen has been classed as having 7 genres, those being • Fantasy • Animation • Comedy • Musical • Family • Adventure Film • Action Film Due to its stereotypical storyline involving princesses and castles, the typical audience would be aimed at young girls. There are a few strong male character, which would entice young boys to have an interest in the film, also the occasional ‘child friendly’ fighting scenes. The film could also appeal to teen girls, as it has a more modern take on the stereotypical princess story, including songs and aspects of the film that teen girls could relate to.
  • 5. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Jw-AeaU5WI UK Trailer http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WdC4DaYIeQ Teaser Trailer http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8TxOICCJxs US Trailer http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQscn0sINGo Featurette
  • 6. Story lineElsa, princess of Arendelle, possesses cryokinesis, the magical ability to create ice and snow. One night while playing, she accidentally injures her younger sister, Anna. The king and queen seek help from trolls, who heal Anna and remove her memories of her sister's magic. The royal couple isolates the children in their castle until Elsa learns to control her powers. Afraid of hurting her sister again, Elsa spends most of her time alone in her room, causing a rift between the girls as they grow up. When the girls are teenagers, their parents die at sea during a storm. When Elsa comes of age, the kingdom prepares for her coronation. Among the guests is the Duke of Weselton, a tradesman seeking to exploit Arendelle for profit. Excited to be allowed out of the castle again, Anna explores the town and meets Prince Hans of the Southern Isles, and the two immediately develop a mutual attraction. Despite Elsa's fear, her coronation goes off without incident. During the reception, Hans proposes and Anna hastily accepts. However, Elsa refuses to grant her blessing and forbids their sudden marriage. The sisters argue, culminating in an emotional Elsa's abilities being exposed. Panicking, Elsa flees the palace, inadvertently unleashing an eternal winter on the kingdom in the process. High in the nearby mountains, she casts off restraint, building herself a solitary ice palace, and unknowingly brings to life her and Anna's childhood snowman, Olaf. Meanwhile, Anna sets out in search of her sister, determined to return her to Arendelle, end the winter, and mend their relationship. While getting supplies, she meets mountain man Kristoff and his reindeer Sven. She convinces him to guide her up the North Mountain. The group then encounters Olaf, who leads them to Elsa's hideaway. Anna and Elsa reunite, but Elsa still fears hurting her sister. When Anna persists in persuading her sister to return, Elsa becomes agitated and accidentally strikes Anna in the heart with her powers. Horrified, she creates a giant snow creature to run the friends away before she accidentally hurts anyone again. As they flee, Kristoff notices Anna's hair is turning white, and deduces something is very wrong. He seeks help from his adoptive family of trolls, who explain that Anna's heart has been frozen. Unless it's thawed by an "act of true love", she will become frozen solid forever. Believing that only Hans can save her, Kristoff races back with her to Arendelle. Meanwhile, Hans, leading a search for Anna, reaches Elsa's palace. In the ensuing battle against the Duke's men, Elsa is knocked unconscious and imprisoned back at the kingdom. There, Hans pleads with her to undo the winter, but Elsa confesses she doesn't know how. When Anna reunites with Hans and begs him to kiss her to break the curse, Hans refuses and reveals that his true intention in marrying her was to seize control of Arendelle's throne. Leaving Anna to die, he charges Elsa with treason for her younger sister's apparent death. Elsa escapes and heads out into the blizzard on the fjord. Olaf finds Anna and reveals Kristoff is in love with her. The two then rush onto the fjord to find him. Hans confronts Elsa and tells her Anna is dead because of her. In Elsa's despair, the storm suddenly ceases, giving Kristoff and Anna the chance to reach each other. However, when Anna sees that Hans is about to kill Elsa, she throws herself between the two and subsequently freezes solid, blocking the blow, knocking Hans off his feet and rendering him unconscious when he hits his head on the icy surface. As Elsa grieves for her sister, Anna's decision to sacrifice herself to save Elsa constitutes an "act of true love" and thaws her. Realizing love is the key to controlling her powers, Elsa is able to thaw the kingdom and even helps Olaf survive in summer. Hans is sent back to the Southern Isles to face punishment for his crimes against the royal family of Arendelle, and Elsa
  • 7. film's production companies and distribution companies Walt Disney Animation Studios Walt Disney Pictures Creators of ‘The little Mermaid’ ‘Toy Story’ (1 & 2) ‘Beauty and the Beast’, ‘The Lion King’ ‘Up’, ‘Planes’ ‘The Princess and the Frog’, etc.
  • 8. casting• Kristen Bell as Anna, princess of Arendelle and Elsa's younger sister – Livvy Stubenrauch as Young Anna – Katie Lopez as Young Anna (singing) – Agatha Lee Monn as 9-year-old Anna (singing) • Idina Menzel as Elsa, the Snow Queen and Anna's elder sister • Eva Bella as Young Elsa – Spencer Lacey Ganus as Teenage Elsa • Jonathan Groff as Kristoff, a mountain man, who owns a reindeer named Sven • Josh Gad as Olaf, a humorous snowman with intentions of experiencing summer • Santino Fontana as Hans, a prince from the Southern Isles • Alan Tudyk as the Duke of Weselton • Ciarán Hinds as Grand Pabbie the Troll King • Chris Williams as Oaken, the owner of Wandering Oaken's Trading Post and Sauna • Maia Wilson as Bulda, a troll • Maurice LaMarche as the King of Arendelle, Anna and Elsa's father • Jennifer Lee as the Queen of Arendelle, Anna and Elsa's
  • 9. Director, Producer, budget On November 30, 2012, it was announced that Jennifer Lee, one of the screenwriters of Wreck-It Ralph, had joined Buck as co-director. The filmmakers hired Lee initially as a screenwriter, following her work on Wreck-It Ralph. Lee then became heavily involved with the film's pre-development process, working closely with director Chris Buck and songwriters, Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez. Following the announcement, Jennifer Lee became the first woman to direct a full-length animated motion picture produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios.
  • 10. soundtrack The Frozen Soundtrack instantly became extremely popular, and became the fasting selling Disney soundtrack since 2003. The soundtrack also sold more copies than Beyoncé's latest album, which came as a shock to most people.
  • 11. Tracklist
  • 12. http://www.cinemablend.com/reviews/Disney-s-Frozen-6644.html
  • 13. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YokGYYTN_GU Red Carpet Interviews El Capitan Theatre marquee showcasing the “Frozen World Premiere” © Rotoscopers View of the white carpet area from across the street. © Rotoscopers
  • 14. Plans for release date - US and UK US - 10 November 2013 UK- 6 December 2013
  • 15. Marketing Disney learned in a good way from Tangled and Brave, which by all accounts were huge smashes at over $200 million U.S. each, that if you totally leave out boys, you will cut your audience potential, fracture families and potentially miss out on a much bigger piece of the pie. The initial marketing for Frozen showed Snow Man Olaf-focused trailers with humorous dialog and no songs, emphasizing its appeal as an animated comedy with “boy humour.” These trailers were followed by previews that included action and adventure. In October, we saw the full plot line, multiple male and female characters, action, song and humour. It wasn’t until the film was released to such widespread love and overwhelming word-of-mouth promotion that audiences learned it was a story dominated by the relationship of two sisters. The slow reveal plan worked; stats show that 43% of audience members are male.’ http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottdavis/2014/01/15/what-marketers-should- learn-from-disneys-frozen/

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