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Voices Of The Voiceless?

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Mobiles, blogs and social media used by marginalized groups around the world. A presentation for the Jan. 28, 2010 Table Talk at American University.

Mobiles, blogs and social media used by marginalized groups around the world. A presentation for the Jan. 28, 2010 Table Talk at American University.

Published in: Technology, News & Politics

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  • V. key finding 4 - Educational Opportunities & Hope for Future




    1. The youth featured in this report have sought to overcome these obstacles in their quest for education, employment


    and other options unavailable in their homeland. Those who are able to achieve further education are empowered by


    their newfound knowledge and skills, which increase their capacity and motivation to work for their communities.


    2. diversity of opinions, but they are connected in schools and online


    3. tech is also connecting them to broader ideas around the world and support
  • Part of team of 8 who did one-month research with 16 youth focused orgs
    - 9 of them are schools
    - 7 are CBOs offering youth-specific training program
    - In total, interviewed 90 youth
    - throughout this report we highlighted youth voices
    next we’ll present our findings
  • These programs need support, however, and this report outlines further ways the international community can


    contribute. Looking ahead, displaced Burmese youth have sought to define their future goals for themselves in the movement towards democracy. Through the perspective of first and second day issues we examine the short and long-term goals of these activists, including their definitions of democracy, human rights and federalism. We also examine the ways they are working to achieve these goals, and their desire to build connections, both within the movement and with the outside world.
  • E - Let's start with the Saffron Revolution. In Sept. 2007, (explanation of protests). Demands. They were the largest protests the nation had seen since 1988. 20 years ago, the military killed over 3,000 protesters. This time, the loss of life was much less because of cell phones, which played a role in both reporting and coordinating.



    M - Closed society. On the reporting side, monks carried camera phones and they and other citizen journalists sent mobile images, video and voice information to the outside world.



    E - Coordination also happened through mobiles, thanks to trusted networks between contacts inside and contact on border. example: joining protest 1km away and not knowing.
  • M - From Saffron Revolution, we take both failures and successes. The success was that, despite 1% penetration, censorship of internet cafes and a blackout on all SMS, the whole world was watching and advocating for the opposition.



    E - failure -> The world's attention led the junta to make a move no other country has dared in the 21st century - a day after their crackdown began, they cut all internet and cell service inside, blacking out all channels of information. The fear is that they and other repressive regimes may learn that silencing cells and the internet are a necessary step in any crackdown on nonviolent protesters. There is no reason to think the Burmese junta would not employ these methods again, unless mobile penetration increases beyond these limits.
  • • Disseminate key information and messages to field workers.
    • Facilitate communication between groups working on these issues.
    • Collect data that can be mapped on the site.
    • Rapidly spread news of human rights violations to the international community and advocacy groups.
  • • Disseminate key information and messages to field workers.
    • Facilitate communication between groups working on these issues.
    • Collect data that can be mapped on the site.
    • Rapidly spread news of human rights violations to the international community and advocacy groups.
  • • Disseminate key information and messages to field workers.
    • Facilitate communication between groups working on these issues.
    • Collect data that can be mapped on the site.
    • Rapidly spread news of human rights violations to the international community and advocacy groups.
  • • Disseminate key information and messages to field workers.
    • Facilitate communication between groups working on these issues.
    • Collect data that can be mapped on the site.
    • Rapidly spread news of human rights violations to the international community and advocacy groups.
  • are these things compatible? that’s up to us. are we sacrificing things we fought for: without minority rights can be dangerous...
  • are these things compatible? that’s up to us. are we sacrificing things we fought for: without minority rights can be dangerous...
  • Intros
  • Transcript

    • 1. TWEETS & BLOGS: VOICES OF THE VOICELESS? HTTP://WWW.FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/WHITEAFRICAN/2736565604/
    • 2. Overcoming Obstacles, Creating Opportunities INITIAL RESEARCH Youth Perspectives from the Thai-Burma Border NEW WORDS MEDIA Youth Perspectives from the Thai-Burma Border
    • 3. KEY FINDING NEW WORDS MEDIA Young Burmese with access to the internet were more likely to identify as activists
    • 4. SAFFRON REVOLUTION WWW.USCAMPAIGNFOR BURMA.ORG Mobile phones were used by monks and other citizen journalists to COORDINATE & BROADCAST information to the outside world
    • 5. extraordinary applications of technology over the past few months have quickly become a target for expanded government surveillance,TECHNICALfuture protests may take place inIN BURMA, more OPENNET INITIATIVE, PULLING THE PLUG: A 7 so that REVIEW OF THE INTERNET SHUTDOWN a much AT constrained context. HTTP://OPENNET.NET/RESEARCH/BULLETINS/013. Figure 1. Timeline of Events, Aug. 19, 2007 - Oct. 13, 2007 Internet in Burma SAFFRON REVOLUTION “People from Burma are always asking for information as well as requesting for help and assistance from [the] outside world but very little of their voices reach the world and most are lost in the endless Will governments learn that silencing mobiles and the state of the government vacuum.” — Burmese blogger internet are a necessary step in any crackdown? By the time the protests began, the SPDC had already established one of the world’s most restrictive
    • 6. FUTURE OF TECH IN BURMA / MYANMAR • MAGAZINES • CONFERENCES • CENSORSHIP • PRIVACY
    • 7. FUTURE OF TECH IN BURMA / MYANMAR • MAGAZINES • CONFERENCES • CENSORSHIP • PRIVACY
    • 8. FUTURE OF TECH IN BURMA / MYANMAR • MAGAZINES • CONFERENCES • CENSORSHIP • PRIVACY
    • 9. FUTURE OF TECH IN BURMA / MYANMAR • MAGAZINES • CONFERENCES • CENSORSHIP • PRIVACY
    • 10. HANDHELD HUMAN RIGHTS Making human rights accessible and actionable Secure Communication Secure Documentation Open Distribution
    • 11. HANDHELD HUMAN RIGHTS Making human rights accessible and actionable Secure Communication Secure Documentation Open Distribution
    • 12. HANDHELD HUMAN RIGHTS Making human rights accessible and actionable Secure Communication Secure Documentation Open Distribution
    • 13. TWITTER REVOLUTION Harnessing a new Tool in Moldova Protests broke out after elections in Moldova Twitter was used to organize
    • 14. TWITTER REVOLUTION Harnessing a new Tool in Moldova Protests broke out after elections in Moldova Twitter was used to organize
    • 15. TWITTER REVOLUTION Harnessing a new Tool in Moldova Protests broke out after elections in Moldova Twitter was used to organize
    • 16. COMMUNITY VOICES 21st century literacy
    • 17. COMMUNITY VOICES 21st century literacy
    • 18. COMMUNITY VOICES 21st century literacy
    • 19. PROJECT EINSTEIN Exploring economic issues in Haiti
    • 20. PROJECT EINSTEIN Exploring economic issues in Haiti
    • 21. HAITI EARTHQUAKE Volunteerism & mapping
    • 22. HAITI EARTHQUAKE Volunteerism & mapping
    • 23. HAITI EARTHQUAKE Volunteerism & mapping
    • 24. WHAT YOU CAN DO: • DONATE MONEY • $25 BUYS A BURMESE SIM CARD • DONATE SKILLS • DESIGNING, PROGRAMMING, MEDIA • VOLUNTEER • WITH OUR PARTNERS IN THE FIELD • JOIN US: • facebook.com/pages/Digital-Democracy • twitter.com/digidem • youtube.com/user/digitaldemocracycam • myspace.com/digidem • flickr.com/digitaldemocracy • hub.witness.org/digitaldemocracytv www.digital-democracy.org @digidem Emily Jacobi @emjacobi ejacobi@digital-democracy.org

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