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  • Covering unit 6-10
  • http://www.birdforum.net/opus/American_Crow
  • http://blogs.ajc.com/jeff-schultz-blog/2009/03/24/fsu-is-dead-to-me-but-capel-is-very-much-alive/
  • http://www.milwent.com/Botox%20results.htm
  • http://http://doctorwho76totterslane.blogspot.com/2010_04_01_archive.html
  • http://http://doctorwho76totterslane.blogspot.com/2010_04_01_archive.html
  • http://www.milwent.com/Botox%20results.htm
  • Read Janelle’s opening paragraph
  • Read Janelle’s second paragraph
  • Read Janelle’s second paragraph
  • Read Janelle’s second paragraph
  • Read Janelle’s second paragraph
  • Read Janelle’s second paragraph
  • Because you cannot learn, to the best of your ability, if you are not in sync with the class.
  • Because the assignments I give you are the ones I want you to focus upon. If I offer extra credit then I am taking you away from the work I have assigned. http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.cartoonstock.com/newscartoons/cartoonists/rma/lowres/rman3018l.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/e/extra_credit.asp&usg=__N1hpWv97YKlwWUma7EOZneXOW6c=&h=400&w=382&sz=29&hl=en&start=8&um=1&tbnid=zs6tvzJj1ZSFhM:&tbnh=124&tbnw=118&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dimage%2Bextra%2Bcredit%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official%26hs%3DFG3%26sa%3DN%26um%3D1
  • http://posterous.com/explore/tag/nerdiness
  • http://www.hsc.unt.edu/education/PACE/images/my-computer.jpg
  • A polymer is a large molecule ( macromolecule ) composed of repeating structural units . These subunits are typically connected by covalent chemical bonds . Although the term polymer is sometimes taken to refer to plastics , it actually encompasses a large class of natural and synthetic materials with a wide variety of properties. Surfactants are compounds that lower the surface tension of a liquid, allowing easier spreading, and lowering of the interfacial tension between two liquids, or between a liquid and a solid. Surfactants may act as detergents , wetting agents , emulsifiers , foaming agents , and dispersants . http://www.hsc.unt.edu/education/PACE/images/my-computer.jpg
  • http://www.hsc.unt.edu/education/PACE/images/my-computer.jpg
  • http://www.walker.co.uk/walkerdam/getimage.aspx?id=9780744586909-1&size=webuse Why this book? Units 6 & 7concepts and planning Remember- we don’t know what dinosaurs sounded like- we can make educated guesses, but we don’t truly know. We don’t know what color their skin was. All ways to pull kids in- to use their imagination. ALSO there were = number ‘girl’ and ‘boy’ dinosaurs! Empower the girls [at zoos parents always say look at him]
  • Waxing crescent (right side lit) We can train ourselves to be good observers- eye witness reports in trials are tricky business! What will happen the next time you walk in this room- will you observe it more actively? Will your eyes be drawn to unusual places?
  • We can train ourselves to be good observers- eye witness reports in trials are tricky business! Should be around 8:20 by now.
  • Original sort- buy color in color bowl- didn’t matter what animal.
  • Then, all the adult cows in one bowl, all the babies in another bowl. Then babies and mamas (her terms) together. “Oh no! The baby cows are not with their Moms. All babies need to be with their Moms. Not a single one can be missing!” they all need to be together? Why? “Because they don’t want to get lost, and I need to help them not get lost.”
  • All horses- ‘Mama’s on the outside, babies on the inside (Eleanor’s terms – age 4)
  • Pairing up Mamas and babies, all mamas on outside, all babies on inside, all going in one direction She noticed the orange has no baby. I asked her about it and she said ‘It is the grandma horse, or the babysitter’
  • On to the pigs…again, a missing one- the baby blue pig. “Maybe somebody dropped it and didn’t keep track of the baby blue pig. There should be two of each color”. (which I never stated)
  • “ Hmmm….we must be missing some.” Why? “There is a big space in this bowl, but not in the others.” Let’s see how many colors there are (counted 6 together in rabbits, cows, horses & pigs- same amount.
  • Tell me about this space ‘IT is very big” why? “because there are no more that I see.” With the bunny bowl you were concerned some were missing, are you concerned about the sheep bowl? “no” Why? “I’m not concerned because I know what happened. Aunt Chris told me there aren’t as many ducks, not as many sheep, not as many rabbits, so I am not concerned. I am scared about this one (the sheep) because the gap is so big. I’m not scared about the duck gap or the rabbit gap because it isn’t as big.’.
  • In the sheep, duck & cows we counted 12, 12, 12. She pointed to each in pairs as she went. Then the cows got all mixed up in the bowl and I asked her to count them again. Which she did, but interestingly she counted by color- even though they were not next to one another in the bowl. Then we sorted the bowls together by totals: 12, 12, 12, then a gap 11, 11 then a gap 10. Which is bigger, 12 or 11? “12, but the 12’ have gaps.” She put the sheep right next to the horses, showed me the big gap in sheep, but not in horses. Why? There are more in horses. Let’s count (again). We did. “there are more in horses’ hmm…we counted 11 horses and 12 sheep, which is bigger 11 or 12? ’12, but there are more horses. I have no more words to say.’
  • http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_l6h7gwxUGoM/SU_JugyA_tI/AAAAAAAAAWU/cV-B2TdBI90/s400/blog-group_of_people.jpg Give them 15 min for this.
  • They should count total number of people first, figure out how many should be in a group to have 5 groups, then figure out what number (from 5) to get to after that.
  • Supplies will be diff weights, clock faces, sniff pads, etc. All science supplies from our supply closet.
  • 10-15 minutes 7:45 Started this at 8:00
  • Supplies will be diff weights, clock faces, sniff pads, etc. All science supplies from our supply closet.
  • Have each group tell their main focus & list their action verbs & 1 assessment – don’t need to explain- just report- let your classmates absorb it. 8:00 ish
  • Have each group tell their main focus & list their action verbs & 1 assessment – don’t need to explain- just report- let your classmates absorb it.
  • Supplies will be diff weights, clock faces, sniff pads, etc. All science supplies from our supply closet.
  • Eleanor (at age 2) counting us on her fingers- then me saying yes! And doing it again to reinforce- her interrupting me to show me exactly who went with each digit (not just anyone can be pointer finger!).
  • Eleanor (at age 2) counting us on her fingers- then me saying yes! And doing it again to reinforce- her interrupting me to show me exactly who went with each digit (not just anyone can be pointer finger!). 8:10
  • Supplies will be diff weights, clock faces, sniff pads, etc. All science supplies from our supply closet.
  • Have each group tell their story Because we didn’t start until 8 pm, each unit got 10 minutes. They didn’t particularly finish any of the activities, which was fine, it got them going on how to create the ideas. At the end of class, review how we began a number of different ways to start a lesson. Hopefully help them plan.
  • Have each group tell their story 8:15
  • Supplies will be diff weights, clock faces, sniff pads, etc. All science supplies from our supply closet.
  • Have each group give their most interesting sorting / grouping by classification (ex: all the sheep w/ the funny ear)
  • Have each group give their most interesting sorting / grouping by classification (ex: all the sheep w/ the funny ear) 8:25
  • Try to be here by 8:30.
  • We need to change this- we can’t have everyone read every book and then do an activity and then facilitate discussion. What would YOU like?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Math & Science for Young Children ECE 141 / 111F winter quarter 2011 Emily McMason Night 3 units 6-10
    • 2.
      • I want to apologize.
      • I didn’t like how fast we
      • did the tangerine analysis
      • last week. I wanted it to
      • be a series of teachable
      • moments that unfolded
      • leisurely and allowed for
      • me to ask divergent
      • questions.
      OOPS.
    • 3.
      • I want to apologize.
      • Our class is so large
      • (which is great!) that I
      • Will be working on how
      • To manage our time in
      • different ways. But I
      • don’t want to create such
      • a structured environment
      • that we don’t have time
      • and space for the really
      • important organic
      • questions
      • And discussions.
      OOPS.
    • 4. Homework Due
      • Come on up and see if I can get your name correctly.
      • Get your folder, take out activity 1 analysis and place in it Activity #2, please.
    • 5. Let’s discuss activity #1
      • First, the format.
      • I don’t have these crow’s feet.
    • 6. Let’s discuss activity #1
      • First, the format.
      • Nor do I have these Crow’s feet.
    • 7. Let’s discuss activity #1
      • First, the format.
      • I do, however, have these crow’s feet.
    • 8.
      • What does that mean? I was not born yesterday, I am not naïve, I was a student, too.
      • What does that mean for you? Don’t double space (or space and a half), don’t use huge font, don’t create enormous margins, don’t put in so many returns after your name that your analysis begins half way down the page. Okay? These things make me grumpy.
    • 9.
      • And when I am grumpy, I don’t grade in a very generous manner.
    • 10. The Format
      • What should it be?
      • A full page, single-spaced document chock full of your insightful, reflective writing analyzing your activity and its relevance to our reading from the text.
    • 11. The Filling
      • What should it be?
      • Paragraph 1: a clear, thoughtful synopsis of ALL the units assigned for the week, not just those from the unit that ties with your activity.
      • Here’s an example…
    • 12. The Filling
      • What should it be?
      • Paragraph 2: a complete description of the activity and how children will participate in it. Including a statement about where you found the activity or whether you created it.
      • Here’s an example…
    • 13. The Filling
      • What should it be?
      • Paragraph 3: Almost like a call and response form of dance. In unit __ on page ___, the authors discuss ___ which is directly mirrored in my activity when the students do __.
      • Here’s an example…
    • 14. The Filling
      • What should it be?
      • Paragraph 4: Justification of age range, which should cover either 1 year of school or 2 years of age (ex: 2 nd grade or 7-8 year olds). If you are teaching 3 & 4 year olds, showing it fits for preoperational stage isn’t enough- that is a huge range (2 to 7) and what works for a 2 year old will flop for a 7 year old and vice versa. You will most likely need to quote multiple pages from our text to make your case. This may be the hardest part of your analysis!
      • Here’s an example…
    • 15. The Topping
      • What should it be?
      • If you plan to go for perfect, you need to either discuss how to adapt it for other children (and justify your choices with support from our text) and / or actually do the activity with children.
      • Here’s an example…
    • 16. For Next Time…
      • You will be writing another analysis for activity 3. Now that you have had a first try and my feedback, the grading will be more exacting – essentially, if you made no improvements from the first one, your grade would go down 1-2 points.
      • Questions?
    • 17.
      • Why does your work need to be on time?
    • 18.
      • Why don’t I offer extra credit?
    • 19. Totally changing gears…
    • 20.
      • Wow. What great
      • discussion posts on angel!
      • (so great I neglected my
      • daughter).
    • 21.
      • Wonderful references to
      • the book (especially citing
      • page numbers).
      • Great intro to new vocabulary ‘polymer’ and ‘surfactant’.
      • Fabulous to do the activity with kids!
    • 22.
      • Please-
      • Don’t write 1 sentence.
      • Don’t write 3 sentences that say the same thing over and over.
    • 23. Encyclopedia Prehistorica Dinosaurs Robert Sabuda & Matthew Reinhart
    • 24.
      • Take 60 seconds to look around this room, all of the walls, all of the desks, your classmates, everything.
      Five Minute Focus
    • 25.
      • Close your eyes and take three deep breaths to cement the images in your mind.
      Five Minute Focus
    • 26.
      • Open your eyes.
      • Without looking around, please write down a description of:
      • The back wall, the number of windows, the color bag of the person sitting behind you, who is sitting in the back row, the color of the hair of the person directly behind you, the shape of the moon the last time you saw it in the sky.
      Five Minute Focus
    • 27.
      • We just worked on enhancing your (child) awareness. 
      Five Minute Focus
    • 28. Any Questions from the reading?
    • 29. Units 6 -10
      • How young scientists use concepts
      • Planning for science
      • One-to-one correspondence
      • Number sense and counting
      • Logic and classifying
    • 30. Unit 6
      • How young scientists use concepts
      • Discrepant events – students enter disequilibrium and are prepared to learn.
      • Balloon skewer!
    • 31. Unit 8
      • One-to-one correspondence
      • Builds in complexity
      • Ex: Eleanor’s birthday party patterns
      • Let’s look at how she created them
    • 32. Units 9 & 10
      • Number sense and counting
      • Logic and classifying
      • Let’s watch and see what a 4 year old does with a naturalistic / informal activity:
    • 33. Logical grouping / classifying: color
    • 34. Logical grouping / classifying: size & type of animal
    • 35. Logical grouping / classifying: 2 sizes sorted & type of animal
    • 36. Logical grouping / classifying: 2 sizes, type of animal, color & pattern
    • 37. Logical grouping / classifying: applied all of the rules to new set of animals right away
    • 38.  
    • 39. Discrepant event: extra space
    • 40. More extra space
    • 41. Rational counting, cardinality & centration
    • 42.
      • Activity #2…gather into your groups and share what you found. Actively participate in person -’s activity.
      Gather in your Groups
    • 43.
      • Count off into 5 groups starting with the number 6. 
      Theory -> Practice
    • 44.
      • Count off into 5 groups starting with the number 6. 
      • Grab your notebook & textbook and gather with your fellow numbers.
      Theory -> Practice
    • 45.
      • Send someone up from your group to grab a set of supplies.
      • Have at least 2 people who are researching terms & concepts in the text.
      • Determine who will be your group recorder.
      Theory -> Practice
    • 46.
      • Play around with your materials and consider (and record) the following:
      • How will you enhance child awareness with these materials?
      • What kind of ‘Teacher Magic’ might happen with these materials?
      • How will you address it?
      • What discrepant event can you deliberately create to jar students from equilibrium into disequilibrium?
      • How will you assess that they have reached both accommodation and assimilation?
      • Does your plan include all steps of the learning cycle?
      Theory -> Practice Unit 6: How Young Scientists Use Concepts
    • 47.
      • Do you love the activity you created? Have someone in your group briefly describe it to the class.
      Theory -> Practice Unit 6: How Young Scientists Use Concepts
    • 48.
      • Pack up your materials and trade them for a new set.
      • Switch so 2 other people are researching terms & concepts in the text.
      • Find someone else who will be your group recorder.
      Theory -> Practice
    • 49.
      • Play around with your materials and consider (and record) the following:
      • How will you integrate this into the curriculum?
      • How will you address multiple learning styles?
      • What do you want students to learn? Web the concepts
      • Pick at least 10 action verbs to be used by students
      • Write an outline for your lesson plan.
      • Brainstorm at least 3 assessment activities.
      Theory -> Practice Unit 7: Planning for Science
    • 50.
      • Do you love the activity you created? Have someone in your group briefly describe it to the class.
      Theory -> Practice Unit 7: Planning for Science
    • 51.
      • Pack up your materials and trade them for a new set.
      • Switch so 2 other people are researching terms & concepts in the text.
      • Find someone else who will be your group recorder.
      Theory -> Practice
    • 52.
      • Play around with your materials and consider (and record) the following:
      • How can you assess if a child understands rational counting?
      • Using your materials create a
        • Naturalistic
        • Informal
        • Structured
        • Activity for teaching 1 to 1 correspondence.
      Theory -> Practice Unit 8: One-to-One Correspondence
    • 53.
      • Do you love the activity you created? Have someone in your group briefly describe it to the class.
      Theory -> Practice Unit 8: One-to-One Correspondence
    • 54.
      • Pack up your materials and trade them for a new set.
      • Switch so 2 other people are researching terms & concepts in the text.
      • Find someone else who will be your group recorder.
      Theory -> Practice
    • 55.
      • Play around with your materials and consider (and record) the following:
      • How can you assess if a child understands counting (both rote and rational)?
      • Use your materials to create a story to engage a child’s imagination around counting (think Goldilocks, etc)
      • Using your story create a Naturalistic, Informal and Structured activity for teaching counting.
      Theory -> Practice Unit 9: Number Sense and Counting
    • 56.
      • Do you love the activity you created? Have someone in your group briefly describe it to the class.
      Theory -> Practice Unit 9: Number Sense and Counting
    • 57.
      • Pack up your materials and trade them for a new set.
      • Switch so 2 other people are researching terms & concepts in the text.
      • Find someone else who will be your group recorder.
      • (by now hopefully everyone has had every job!)
      Theory -> Practice
    • 58.
      • Play around with your materials and consider (and record) the following:
      • Create a total of 11 quick exercises. Divide them roughly into an equal number of sorting and grouping activities. The activities should cover these classifications: color, shape, size, material, pattern, texture, function, association, class name, common features, and number.
      • Make sure you have covered Naturalistic, Informal, and Structured types of activities in the 11 quick exercises. If not, adjust.
      Theory -> Practice Unit 10: Logic & Classifying
    • 59.
      • Do you love the activity you created? Have someone in your group briefly describe it to the class.
      Theory -> Practice Unit 10: Logic & Classifying
    • 60.
      • If We Have Time…
    • 61.
      • Upcoming Major Assignment due 2/9
      • B. Science and Math Library B & C together are 20% grade
      • Find and read 10 books that you would like to include in your Math and Science Library.
    • 62.
      • These books should be attractive in story, pace, pictures and words. They should also teach or expose the reader to math and/or science concepts. You do not need to purchase the books, therefore utilizing the library or browsing your local bookstore is fine.
    • 63.
      • Your books need to be age appropriate, and thus be geared for children ages 0-8. At least 2 need to be appropriate for infants [ages 0-1]; 2 for toddlers [ages 2-3] ; 2 for preschoolers [ages 4-5]; 2 for early elementary schoolers [ages 6-7]; and 2 for 8 years old and up. In addition, half should focus on math and the other half on science.
    • 64.
      • Write an abstract [using the Writing to Publish Format] for each book, including:
      • 1. Title, Author, publisher, and ISBN number
      • 2. A summary of the story
      • 3. Identification of the math and/or science concepts and vocabulary that the story or pictures present
      • 4. Description of the age that is appropriate for this book and why [see ‘concepts and skills’ page 3], ‘standards for school mathematics’ pages 7-11, and Appendix A Developmental Assessment Tasks, page 583
    • 65. Last Year…
      • C. Book Presentation
      • Bring your favorite children’s book from assignment B to class and share it. You will read it to the class, then ask classmates to identify the math and/or science concepts. Introduce a math /science activity that ties to the book, and facilitate a discussion with your classmates about how to build the connection between the two.
    • 66.
      • If We Have Time…
    • 67.
      • Have each group set up their favorite activity that they created, have other groups rotate through and explore the invented activities.