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  • Covering units 1-5
  • I’ll start every class with a book- one you are welcome to use, but not in assignments B or C!  Why? To show you how to connect what you already do to math & science. Each book I’ve chosen melds with the units we are studying that day. Why this book? It fits the skills discussed in unit 5
  • Who knew David Bowie even had an official calendar for 2009? (best way to find a calendar picture is to search for ‘image of calendar 2009) 9/10 is fabulous work. 10/10 means you’ve gone way beyond the expectations. Worried about a 9/10 ave? That’s where class part will come in http://www.jayceooi.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/calendar2010.jpg
  • 20 minutes every day Why not 20 minutes of math & science? Reading- tells us about our experience – about the world around us. So does science. Reading is a language – a way to describe things. So is math. ‘ math class is tough’ barbie read to them
  • 20 minutes every day Why not 20 minutes of math & science? Reading- tells us about our experience – about the world around us. So does science. Reading is a language – a way to describe things. So is math. ‘ math class is tough’ barbie
  • 20 minutes every day Why not 20 minutes of math & science? Reading- tells us about our experience – about the world around us. So does science. Reading is a language – a way to describe things. So is math. ‘ math class is tough’ barbie
  • 20 minutes every day Why not 20 minutes of math & science? Reading- tells us about our experience – about the world around us. So does science. Reading is a language – a way to describe things. So is math. ‘ math class is tough’ barbie
  • 20 minutes every day Why not 20 minutes of math & science? Reading- tells us about our experience – about the world around us. So does science. Reading is a language – a way to describe things. So is math. ‘ math class is tough’ barbie
  • By questions I am assuming you did the reading AND went through the PP. I am not going to define each word.
  • Draw on the board. List these 5 , make 2 columns. Write your own ideas in left, write our group def on right. – take WAY too long? Pedagogically, this is terrible, but we need to get through it. Concept- idea, building block of knowledge Preprimary- years before 1 st grade Primary – 1 st to 3 rd grade Development- changes that take place do to growth and experience Senses- the body functions we use to explore the world- see, touch, smell, hear & taste. 6 th sense- intuition- [alphabet vs goddess]
  • Process skills- math concepts like comparing, classifying and measuring are called this when applied to science problems. Other science process skills are: observing, communicating, inferring, hypothesizing, defining & controlling variables. [only change one thing at a time!] Understanding- in other words- not memorizing 6 principles for math instruction (NCTM) equity, curriculum, teaching, learning, assessment, technology [I disagree with this one] Standards- what children should know and be able to do at different ages [see pages 7-11 in text]
  • Jean P. 1896-1980. a Swiss philosopher, natural scientist and developmental theorist, well known for his work studying children, his theory of cognitive development and for his epistemological view called "genetic epistemology.” [origins of knowledge] [ genetic as in genesis] The very great importance he attached to the education of children made him declare in 1934 in his role as Director of the International Bureau of Education that ‘only education is capable of saving our societies from possible collapse, whether violent, or gradual’[1] wiki Contributed enormously to understanding of children’s thought. Identified 4 periods of cognitive, or mental, growth and development. For Early Childhood Educators, we focus on the first 2 and ½.
  • Contributed enormously to understanding of children’s thought. Identified 4 periods of cognitive, or mental, growth and development. For Early Childhood Educators, we focus on the first 2 and ½. Sensorimotor- birth to age 2. [senses and motor skills- grasp, crawl, stand & walk] to explore the world. By the end of this they have the idea of Object permanence- it is real and there, even when out of sight [eleanor (age 2) after the storm- where is the grass? – she knew it had to be there even if she couldn’t see it] Object recognition- use color, shape, size to id things: extrapolate one car to another. Representational thought- think through a solution before attacking a problem. [ex: me telling eleanor she had to change out of her dress before eating frozen blueberries, she went and found bibs instead age 2]
  • 4 of these don’t even register in spell check, and as a science geek, not a lit chick, I have to admit they make me nervous! Preoperational period- ages 2 to 7 Preconcepts- ideas that aren’t fully complete- lack maturity or full clarity Symbolic behaviors –fancy way to say the world of pretend play. words or objects in place of other things ex: playing the role of ‘mama bear’, or handing a child a block and pretending it is a sandwich. Centration – children ‘center’ on most obvious aspect of what they see- ball of playdough must be a different amount if rolled out. [centered on shape]. Stacks of coins vs all over table, etc. Reversability- ability to mentally reverse the process they observed [seeing the clay back as a ball] Conservation – ability to hold or save original picture in their mind…precursors to this are counting, 1 to 1 correspondence, etc. Seriation – putting items in logical sequence big to small, dark to light Classification – all same color, shape, size, etc.
  • 4 of these don’t even register in spell check, and as a science geek, not a lit chick, I have to admit they make me nervous! Preoperational period- ages 2 to 7 Preconcepts- ideas that aren’t fully complete- lack maturity or full clarity Symbolic behaviors –fancy way to say the world of pretend play. words or objects in place of other things ex: playing the role of ‘mama bear’, or handing a child a block and pretending it is a sandwich. Centration – children ‘center’ on most obvious aspect of what they see- ball of playdough must be a different amount if rolled out. [centered on shape]. Stacks of coins vs all over table, etc. Reversability- ability to mentally reverse the process they observed [seeing the clay back as a ball] Conservation – ability to hold or save original picture in their mind…precursors to this are counting, 1 to 1 correspondence, etc. Seriation – putting items in logical sequence big to small, dark to light Classification – all same color, shape, size, etc.
  • Concrete operations- 3 rd period ages 7 to 11 Abstract symbolic activities – able to mentally manipulate groups represented by number symbols & what math operations mean Formal operations – ages 11 to adult learn to problem solve in logical and systematic manner Physical knowledge- Piaget divides knowledge, gained by interaction with environment, into three categories. Physical includes characteristics- color, weight, size, etc Logico-mathematical – relationships each individual develops [more and less, same and different, number, etc] to make sense of the world and organize info. Social – created by people [rules for behavior in various social situations] Autonomy – independence- the aim of education.
  • Also a cognitive development theorist. Contemporary of Piaget’s. Signs- mental tools people created to communicate- speech most imp., also writing and numbering. Whereas Piaget thought development came from child, Vygotsky thought that was true through age 2, then culture and cultural signs were necessary to expand thought. ZPD-area btwn where the child is now operating independently and where she might go with assistance from adult or more mature child. Scaffolding- think about the outside of a newly constructed building- or earthquake repair- the supports needed to move ahead.
  • Learning cycle- the manner in which learning happens. Exploration, concept development, concept application. True for any kind of learning. [see it, do it, teach it] Descrp lessons- skip For young children the LC is the following: Awareness- broad recognition of objects, people, events or concepts Exploration- construction of personal meaning to objects, people, events or concepts Inquiry- compare their constructions with those of the culture, commonalities are recognized, generalizations made Utilization- apply and use understanding to new situations and settings
  • Write down a way for each intelligence. Who can give me an example? Counting aloud, hash marks, jumping each one, talking together, doing alone, singing a scale (think do ray me), pick-up sticks, walking sticks, eras of time, names of nations
  • Think of all the different ways you can teach the same material – just by moving around within these different frameworks. Learning cycle- the manner in which learning happens. Exploration, concept development, concept application. True for any kind of learning. [see it, do it, teach it] Naturalistic -What does this sound like? Least formal, child-driven, no adult agenda, pure open-ended exploration Informal – child directs, but adult steps in with questions, comments, to help move child to next level of understanding [scaffolding] Ex: page 27 Structured learning- teacher driven – activities are preplanned. Ex page 28 All three are vital! Think about feather and ball falling- if only informal, kids may always think lighter things fall more slowly. [2 pieces of paper crumple] Divergent / convergent – how can you group these items? / which is the smallest?
  • Think of all the different ways you can teach the same material – just by moving around within these different frameworks.
  • I try to be VERY clear when I’m covering class content and when I’m giving you my opinion. Chapter 10 brings up the issue of TV again, including guidelines for controlling TV use. http://www.campaignforamericaskids.org/3B_holiday_gift.html http://www.chiangmainews.com/images/ecmn/data/050_soap_box3.jpg
  • http://www.campaignforamericaskids.org/3B_holiday_gift.html http://www.chiangmainews.com/images/ecmn/data/050_soap_box3.jpg
  • Candyce & AAP kids website http://www.campaignforamericaskids.org/3B_holiday_gift.html http://www.chiangmainews.com/images/ecmn/data/050_soap_box3.jpg
  • Candyce & AAP kids website http://www.campaignforamericaskids.org/3B_holiday_gift.html http://www.chiangmainews.com/images/ecmn/data/050_soap_box3.jpg
  • Candyce & AAP kids website http://www.campaignforamericaskids.org/3B_holiday_gift.html http://www.chiangmainews.com/images/ecmn/data/050_soap_box3.jpg
  • Unit 4, give each group an activity- have them create a recording sheet, portfolio rubric, portfolio summary analysis. What would the tasks be for LRC? Ex: left right center. Goal: assess if they can count up to 3, know left from right, can follow order of who takes turns. This is not nec. For your observation project, but might be helpful
  • Observing: Split class in half, everyone have a partner. Grab an orange. Look it over. carefully. Put it back in the bag Comparing: Take all the oranges out. Can you identify which one is yours? Classifying: can you place them in one group? Two? Three? Based on what properties? Color, shape, size, smell, etc. Measuring: circumference of diameter, height or width in CM. Communicating: make a graph or map or pictures to show the other big group what you found Inferring: can you infer what it will taste like based on appearances? Predicting: based on your prior understanding of oranges, if you peeled it, how many sections would there be? Hypothesizing: Defining and Controlling variables
  • Noether, carver, newton, franklin
  • See book starting on page 72-77.

Transcript

  • 1. Math & Science for Young Children ECE 141 / 111F winter quarter 2010 Emily McMason Night 2 units 1-5
  • 2. Homework Due
    • Please take a folder, write your name on the label and hand in Activity #1.
    • Wander up to the front, see if I can guess your name, and have me check your key terms for units 1 – 5 (this goes towards your participation points).
  • 3. Tops & Bottoms Adapted & Illustrated by Janet Stevens
  • 4.
    • OOPS! I forgot to ask
    • each of you what is the
    • age group you work
    • with the most.
  • 5.
    • Tami had a great
    • thought about this-
    • What about rearranging
    • groups so that you are
    • with others who teach
    • the same age?
  • 6.
    • If school is closed: Schoolreport.org
    • If I need to cancel class:
    • on our class page
    • Email
  • 7.
    • Write down all of your feelings that first come to mind when you think about math & science.
    Five Minute Focus
  • 8.
    • Write down all of your feelings that first come to mind when you think about math & science.
    • Now do the same thing for reading.
    Five Minute Focus
  • 9.
    • Write down all of your feelings that first come to mind when you think about math & science.
    • Now do the same thing for reading.
    • How do these compare?
    • What does our culture think about math & science? Reading?
    Five Minute Focus
  • 10.
    • Reading tells us about our experiences, it describes the world around us.
    Five Minute Focus
  • 11.
    • Reading tells us about our experiences, it describes the world around us.
    • So does Science.
    Five Minute Focus
  • 12.
    • Reading is using a language, a way to describe the world around us.
    Five Minute Focus
  • 13.
    • Reading is using a language, a way to describe the world around us.
    • So is Math.
    Five Minute Focus
  • 14.
    • Speaking of languages….There were 37 vocabulary terms you slogged through in Unit 1.
    • Grab your notebooks, I want to answer any questions and highlight a few.
  • 15.
    • On your mark…get set…write (and think!)
    • Concept
    • Preprimary
    • Primary
    • Development
    • Senses
    • Example definitions given online.
    Vocab
  • 16.
    • Process skills
    • Understanding
    • Principles
    • Standards
    • Any Questions?
    Vocab
  • 17.
    • Who knows Jean Piaget?
    • What is important about his work?
    Vocab
  • 18.
    • 10. Sensorimotor period
    • 11. Object permanence example
    • 12. Object recognition
    • 13. Representational thought example
    Vocab
  • 19.
    • Preoperational period
    • Preconcepts
    • Symbolic behaviors
    • Centration
    • Reversability
    • Conservation
    • Seriation
    • Classification
    • Any Questions?
    Vocab
  • 20.
    • Jump up and down, stretch, moan, whatever. We only have 16 more to go…
    Vocab
  • 21.
    • 22. Concrete operations
    • 23. Abstract symbolic activities
    • Formal operations
    • Physical knowledge
    • Logico-mathematical knowledge
    • Social knowledge
    • Autonomy
    • Any Questions?
    Vocab
  • 22.
    • Lev Vygotsky
    • Signs
    • Zone of Proximal Development [ZPD]
    • Scaffolding
    Vocab
  • 23.
    • 32. Learning Cycle
    • (33. Descriptive lessons – skipping this)
    • 34. Awareness
    • 35. Exploration
    • 36. Inquiry
    • 37. Utilization
    Vocab
  • 24.
    • We made it!
    Vocab
  • 25.
    • Learning Styles- the work of Howard Gardner.
    • Multiple intelligences: linguistic , logical-mathematical, bodily-kinesthetic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, musical, spatial, naturalist, existential .
    • Teach a child to count to 10.
    • Can you do it using all 9 intelligences ?
    Unit 2
  • 26.
    • Piaget /Vygotsky
    • Learning cycle
    • Natural /informal /structured
    • Divergent / convergent
    • Multiple intelligences
    • … is your head spinning yet?
    Now for some Fun?
  • 27.
    • I completely, fully, 100% disagree with the text about technology.
    • No need until they are ‘fully literate’ which is usually 5 th grade.
    • Children stop using their minds [the calculator must be right]
    • The line between ‘education’ and ‘game’ is too small, and the detriments are too many…obesity, violence, pregnancy, etc.
    • And all of this is ironic because because this is hybrid class. However, you are not 5 th graders (and you are smarter!)
    One BIG divergence:
  • 28. If you’ve ever had me for class before…
    • … you recognize this image:
  • 29.
    • 99% of US households have a TV (including mine.)
    Often, the topic will be TV.
  • 30.
    • Often, the topic will be TV.
    • Usually it will be about kids and TV.
    • But today I wanted to make sure you had all seen this headline:
    • Too much TV may mean earlier death
  • 31.
    • Too much TV may mean earlier death
    • ( Health.com ) -- Watching too much television can make you feel a bit brain-dead. According to a new study, it might also take years off your life.
    • The more time you spend watching TV, the greater your risk of dying at an earlier age -- especially from heart disease , researchers found.
    • The study followed 8,800 adults with no history of heart disease for more than six years. Compared to those who watched less than two hours of TV per day, people who watched four hours or more were 80 percent more likely to die from heart disease and 46 percent more likely to die from any cause. All told, 284 people died during the study.
  • 32.
    • Too much TV may mean earlier death
    • Each additional hour spent in front of the TV increased the risk of dying from heart disease by 18 percent and the overall risk of death by 11 percent, according to the study, which was published Monday on the Web site of Circulation, an American Heart Association journal. (The study will appear in the Jan. 26 print edition.)
  • 33. Mental stretch
  • 34.
    • share your activities
    • Give each other copies of the activity
    • Participate in classmate #A’s (and E’s if your group has 5 people in it) activity
    Gather in your Groups
  • 35.
    • SCIENCE as a VERB , not a noun .
    • Science is a way of thinking and acting , not a collection of facts.
    • Science is a way of trying to discover the nature of things.
    • The attitudes and skills that enable us to discover science are the same ones that allow us to solve every day problems .
    Unit 5
  • 36. Unit 5
  • 37.
    • Differentiating the different types of science: life science, health science & nutrition, physical science, earth & space science, science & technology education, history & nature of science
    Unit 5
  • 38.
    • As a group, pick one of these science topics and plan how you would include process, attitude & content (hint, look in your text).
    • life science,
    • health science & nutrition
    • physical science
    • earth & space science
    • science & technology education
    • history & nature of science
    • You may use any of the materials at the front of the room to help you design your activity.
    Unit 5