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National Conference on Youth Cyber Safety

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  • Youth are living out their lives online. What they do in the digital environment affects how they feel about themselves and the relationships around them. What they post and how they communicate impacts their future academic and employment opportunities.  YOUTH: Technology is a lifestyle. They emotionally connect with each other through their digital devices and web platforms. They are emotionally connected THROUGH their technology.They use these platforms to define their relationships and live out their lives in the digital environment.What youth do with their digital devices affects how they feel about themselves and the relationships around them. It is important to recognize that adults and youth have different relationships with digital technology. PARENTS:Technology is a TOOL.It is not necessarily the vehicle that makes them feel more loved or close to someone.Technology is something that is used for efficiency, to enhance their offline lives. This is why, as caring adults, we need to be in this space.
  • Youth are living out their lives online. What they do in the digital environment affects how they feel about themselves and the relationships around them. What they post and how they communicate impacts their future academic and employment opportunities.  YOUTH: Technology is a lifestyle. They emotionally connect with each other through their digital devices and web platforms. They are emotionally connected THROUGH their technology.They use these platforms to define their relationships and live out their lives in the digital environment.What youth do with their digital devices affects how they feel about themselves and the relationships around them. It is important to recognize that adults and youth have different relationships with digital technology. PARENTS:Technology is a TOOL.It is not necessarily the vehicle that makes them feel more loved or close to someone.Technology is something that is used for efficiency, to enhance their offline lives. This is why, as caring adults, we need to be in this space.
  • Introduce FOSI video[Play Video]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTWqZc1B144
  • 95% of all teens ages 12-17 are now online and 80% of those online teens are users of social media sites.88% of social media-using teens have witnessed other people be mean or cruel on social network sites.Lenhart ,Madden, Smith, Purcell, Zickuhr, Rainie (2011)
  • What is success then? For our child to be: Ethical Responsible Resilient To be resilient means that they know how to respond—to understand expectations, recognize when something goes wrong in the digital environment, and know how to handle it. One of our most important roles as parents is to provide a network of support for the digital environment particularly when something goes wrong. GUIDANCE FROM PARENTSOver the course of millennia, parents have helped their offspring be successful in new environments by teaching them how to thrive. The only difference with technology is that youth jumped in first. But it is just as essential that parents join them and participate as role models in that space as much as anywhere else.The human brain’s frontal lobe (judgment center) is not fully developed until people reach 21-25 years. We can’t expect teens to act like responsible adults without oversight and intervention.
  • The good news! You don’t have to be a computer expert to protect your child online. By following these three, simpleconcepts, we can help our child to have a more healthy, safe, secure and ethical experience in the digital environment.  3 KEEPs for Parents™KEEP CURRENT.  KEEP COMMUNICATING.  KEEP CHECKING.™KEEP CURRENT with the technology your child uses. You don’t have to be an expert, but a little understanding goes a long way towards keeping your child safe online. "Friend" them on facebook, and pay attention to who their friends are. Know how to use the reporting and privacy functions, and set an example of flagging inappropriate content or behavior when you see it.                 KEEP COMMUNICATING with your child about everything they experience on the Internet.  Know their lingo, and ask when you don’t understand something.  Work to keep the lines of communication open.KEEP CHECKING your child’s Internet activity.  Know where they go online. Let them know that you'll keep checking because you want them to understand that the Internet is a public forum and never truly private. Everything they do online contributes to their digital reputation. Help them develop an online reputation that is an asset rather than a liability.These are “evergreen” concepts that apply to all the parenting situations that will arise.
  • Danahboyd and Alice Marwick’s research on Bullying
  • Danahboyd and Alice Marwick’s research on BullyingJamey committed suicide in September 2011 after being tormented by his classmates for being gay. He was aggressively and repeatedly victimized. Jamey recognized that he was being bullied and asked explicitly for help, but this is not always the case. Many teenagers who are bullied can’t emotionally afford to identify as victims, and youth who bully others rarely see themselves as perpetrators. “For a teenager to recognize herself or himself in the adult language of bullying carries social and psychological costs. It requires acknowledging oneself as either powerless or abusive.”Marwick and boyd state that adults need to start paying attention to the language of youth if they want antibullying interventions to succeed.
  • Danahboyd and Alice Marwick’s research on BullyingWhile teenagers denounced bullying, they (especially girls) would describe many of interpersonal conflicts playing out as “drama”Boyd and Marwick learned that young people mostly use the term drama because it is empowering.
  • Danahboyd and Alice Marwick’s research on Bullying5 Components of Drama:social and interpersonalinvolves relational conflictReciprocalGenderedOften performed for, in, and magnified by networked publics
  • Danahboyd and Alice Marwick’s research on BullyingThe ways that drama is practiced by teenagers take several different forms, all related to publicity.
  • Danahboyd and Alice Marwick’s research on BullyingWhile teen conflict will never go away, social networking sites have changed how it operates. Technology allows teens to carve out identities for themselves even when involved in social conflict. Understanding how “drama” operates is necessary to recognize teens’ own defenses against the realities of aggression, gossip in networked publics.
  • Danahboyd and Alice Marwick’s research on BullyingWhen teenagers acknowledge that they’re being bullied, adults need to provide programs similar to those that help victims of abuse. They must also recognize that emotional recovery is a long and difficult process.“The key is to help young people feel independently strong, confident and capable without first requiring them to see themselves as either an oppressed person or an oppressor.”
  • Parents should have conversations with their kids about their:RELATIONSHIPSREPUTATIONRESILIENCY
  • We need to help youth recognize our expectation regarding healthy and responsible: CONTACT –whom they connect withCONTENT – what they consume and shareCONDUCT – how they respond and interact digitally. This includes how to be an ethical bystander, willing to report abuse, flag hurtful content and intervene when needed. Also, we want kids to come to us when things are bothering them. Consider using one of the following stories:  STORY: A mother whose daughter came to her when someone hacked into her Facebook account. She was able to support her daughter through this difficult time. She helped her daughter contact Facebook and regain control of her account. Had she minimized this situation as being trivial, her daughter would not involve her in future situations. STORY: a 16-year old boy in the UK was chatting online with a girl in Maryland about taking his own life. The girl told her mother who alerted Maryland police, starting a chain that involved a White House Special Agent, the British Embassy in Washington, Scotland Yard, and finally the local Thames Valley Police who managed to narrow down the suspect pool to eight based on a name and a school. The boy had overdosed but was still conscious when authorities found him. His parents had no idea he was considering suicide.  Research shows that kids don’t approach adults when things go wrong online because they’re afraid their parent won’t understand and worse they are worried their parents will take away their digital connections. They would rather suffer alone than risk being taken out of the digital space. This is how they emotionally connect. Lastly, children need to understand that they need to be the same person online as they are offline.
  • We can help our child learn to create an online reputation that is an asset rather than a liability. What our child posts this year will leave a permanent digital footprint that may impact their future opportunities. The following video helps us better understand how we create our own digital reputation and dossier.
  • We can help our child learn to create an online reputation that is an asset rather than a liability. What our child posts this year will leave a permanent digital footprint that may impact their future opportunities. The following video helps us better understand how we create our own digital reputation and dossier.
  • MANAGING VIOLENT AND UNHEALTHY CONTENT  Youth need strategies from their parents to help them navigatethe unhealthy and hurtful content they will encounter. Help them understand your expectations around pornography, hate speech, violence, gambling, and sites that promote self-destructive behavior like anorexia, suicide, drug and alcohol abuse. Internet filters and parental controls will help you establish your expectations for content in your home. Even savvy youth who can get around filters need the benefit of knowing what their parents choose to block in their homes. The point of the filter is to set the bar.  NOTE: Youth will see inappropriate content and hear about it from other students. There is no way to protect them fully from it: the key is to help them know how to react to it and to come to you for help.Sometimes this is traumatic. We want our children to come to us when they see something that makes them feel uncomfortable or anxious.  Talk about personal boundaries with them. Role play situations. This will help them know how to react when they’re exposed to something harmful. Help them learn how to report abuse and to respond to a wide range of concerns: For example, if they are being mistreated, stalked, harassed, OR if they see someone being mistreated. Be an UPstander and say something rather than being a passive bystander.Help kids understand: People do NOT have a constitutional right to use media platforms however they’d like. For example: Facebook prohibits harassment, pornography, hate speech, fraud, and other inappropriate content on its site, and it will intervene when these are flagged. Users who violate the Facebook terms of service agreement will receive a warning or have their account deleted (usually after multiple infractions). Reports are anonymous. Have conversations around theses important topics and help kids and teens know how to respond. If parents don’t discuss these hard topics, the information their children receive will come from peers.
  • Identify the Generation Suite Tools:Resource Library and Professional360 Self AssessmentIncident Response Tool & Flowchart (IRT)
  • Refer them to their handout “Detection.” Tell them that there is an updated version…and it will be made available in the Resource Library. Following the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting where thirty-three students were killed, President Bush ordered an intensive study overseen by the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Education, and the Attorney General.  A central learning outcome of the study was that significant warning signs typically precede major incidents, and many of these warning signs are digital.   Governor Mike Leavitt, former Secretary of Health & Human Services who helped lead the investigation said,“We are missing vital clues if we do not tune in to the signs of potential problems students digitally share.  Teachers and parents must be alert and respond to these clues.  This is an essential part of the detection process.”
  • Our goal is to empower schools to better detect these clues. iKeepSafe Generation Safe™ emphasizes whole school involvement, heightened awareness, and organized reporting of all digital incidents. It offers resources aimed to detect potential problems before they escalate into something very serious and surprising, and provides education on how to appropriately report and manage an incident to support any victims.
  • Former Missouri ICAC (Internet Crimes Against Children) Commander Lt. Joe Laramie encourages administers and educators to be aware of behavioral indicators that something is wrong. If a student is acting differently today than they were last week, a month ago, or even a year ago, there may be an underlying reason.  “High achievers don’t just stop being high achievers,” Laramie said. “Usually there is a reason—it could be that they are stressed or distracted. And it’s important to recognize these symptoms as red flags that could indicate a larger problem.” Common Indicators include:School refusal or excuses for school avoidance (e.g. feeling sick)Wanting to go to school a different way (e.g. changing the route or being driven instead of catching the bus)Being tense, tearful and unhappy before or after schoolTalking about hating school or other childrenSuspicious bruises or scratchesDamage to, or loss of, personal belongingsSleeping difficulties including nightmares and enuresisSocial withdrawalRefusing to discuss what happens at schoolSomatic symptoms such as headache or abdominal pain
  • It’s not enough for educators alone to be aware of these red flags, students need a strong network of support that includes all stakeholders in the community—parents, law enforcement, and school staff.  Captain Kirk S. Marlowe, Virginia State Police Bureau of Criminal Investigation High Tech Crimes Division, acknowledges that educators and law enforcement officers sometimes harbor negative stereotypes about each other. He emphasizes how both parties can overcome their misperceptions through meeting and talking with one another. Neither discipline has all of the answers, and in fact, both need to collaborate with each other and with parents to successfully keep students safe online by working together. By meeting together and creating a positive relationship prior to any incidents, both school staff and law enforcement will be better equipped to work together when incidents occur.  The same principle is true for schools and parents. It will be difficult for an educator or administrator to approach a parent about their student if the first time they are doing so is in response to an incident. On the other hand, if a relationship has been established prior to any problems, both parties will be more likely to collaborate and cooperate with one another.  Another reason it is important for school stakeholders and parents to collaborate is because many students are more likely to disclose information to their parents than to their teachers. An Australian study of 415 high school students found that more than half (54%) would not report bullying to adults, and of those that would report, students more frequently said they would tell a parent, followed by a school friend, and then a teacher.Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. RMIT research confirms bullying problem. Available at www.rmit.com/au/browse;ID=eee2oapnuddq.
  • Because students may be reluctant to share information, it is very important that schools create a positive school climate that helps students feel comfortable both admitting to problems they may encounter (i.e., bullying) and also potential threats they may identify (i.e., peers planning to do something inappropriate).  Below is a list of strategies recommended by Dr. Michael Rich, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Associate Professor of Society, Human Development, and Health at Harvard School of Public Health to foster a positive school climate: Be present, and be problem-solving. Teachers and administrators need to be present and accessible in the spaces where they hope to influence culture—and that includes both physical and cyberspace. Toward that end, understand that cell phones help create the school environment, so set an expectation that teachers have access to kids’ phones at any time. If they find something problematic in text messages, proceed based on your school’s plan—and realize that the students involved need support and education rather than punishment. Approach bullying as a cry for help for all involved. Those who bully in physical or cyberspace are almost always themselves victims of bullying. Adult response to a bullying incident should be firm on what will be tolerated and what won’t, but the consequences should be curative rather than punitive. Use this as an opportunity to understand and address the underlying issues. Make it clear that certain behaviors are not appropriate. Ultimately, everyone in the community—from teachers to bystanders to victims to bullies to parents—needs to define what’s acceptable and what’s not. Teachers and administrators should handle inappropriate behavior consistently and firmly, but they should also remember that all involved will need support. Teach students to create their own environment. Use the old-fashioned hall monitor or RA equivalent by giving particular students the special role of helping keep the peace. Have cyber monitors who function as peer mentors who also keep an eye on things from within. Pay attention to students’ behavior—especially when there are noticeable changes. When you notice a change, talk to them. Ask what’s going on. Be accessible to them and make it clear that you are not going to punish them; this is about helping them build their own society and the kind of school they want to live in. Take Advantage of Generation
  • 97 % ofAdministrators agree that schools should haveK–12 CURRICULUMthat prepares young people to enter the workforce as cyber-capable employees.36% of teachers RECEIVED NO TRAININGby their school districts in issues related to online safety, security and ethics in the past year. Teachers feel ill-equipped to address the problems presented by new technology. 97% of students & faculty feel that learning technology skills in school will lead to better career opportunities in the future.However, only 39% of students believe their schools meet their technology expectations.
  • Identify the Generation Suite Tools:Resource Library and Professional360 Self AssessmentIncident Response Tool & Flowchart (IRT)
  • You are here because your schools feel you are particularly capable of creating or adding to a cultural change in the school.
  • [Share quotes from users]
  • [Share quotes from users]
  • INCIDENT RESPONSE TOOL: Background
  • Contribution of expert advice in development
  • Learning Modules
  • Learning Modules
  • Flowchart – begins with administrator first learning of an incident.
  • Flowchart – Use case study
  • Storage of Evidence – Plan for evidence storage should be prepared before incident occurs.
  • Red buttons for printing the flowchart and instructions
  • Investigate and Incident – use case study
  • View the questions you may ask from the various perspectives.
  • Point out print forms
  • Print Follow up Forms
  • Here’s a quick video, and then if time allows, we could go through the 4 questions to help us respond.What would you do if you were the teacher?What would you do if you were the administrator?What questions might you ask Megan?What questions might you ask her boyfriend?What questions might you ask the other students in the class?
  • Prevention/Detection/Intervention
  • Schools and Stakeholders focus
  • Defining Success for Digital CitizenshipGoal is to help schools grow in each of these six areas.
  • Green Buttons will help you find topics of interest [Review and discuss briefly]
  • 360 background and global use. (Separate login)
  • Whole School focus required. 360 will help you assess all the aspects that should be addressed in digital citizenship at your school.
  • District Administrator role – monitoring progress of schoolsNote improvement actions. Resource links.Look at the 360 Structure Map. [Review map as needed]
  • Requirements of medals; show examples of evidenceBronze: Commit to improve the school by registering for the 360 Self Assessment.Silver: Record a score of Level 2 or higher in any Aspect and reach the benchmark in half of all AspectsGold: Complete the 360 Self Assessment and meet the benchmark level for all Aspects. Submit key pieces of “evidence” of accomplishmentPlatinum: Receive an onsite iKeepSafe Assessor, prepare a portfolio of accomplishments, and mentor another school in the Generation Safe™ Program.
  • Full color 28-page document that allows you to view the topics/sections/aspects along with improvement actions for each level. Printable version.
  • [Show benchmark indicators in 360. Explain benchmark.]Medal program: certificates and logos as schools qualify.
  • Take notes of evidence as your school improves
  • As you answer questions throughout the survey, it provides you with suggested actions for improvement to assist you in achieving the next level.
  • Show were reports are generated, how they work.
  • Generation Safe tools will help you build on what you’ve already accomplished in your school. QUESTIONS:Where is your school?Consider the futures timeline: where are you and where can you go from here?What would you like to accomplish?
  • Take advantage of parental controls and filters offered by your cell phone carrier. Call your cell phone company. Talk to a real person. Ask them to enable filters or (for an extra fee) parental controls to help manage time limits and texting limits.

Transcript

  • 1. PEAC E O F MIN D F O R FAMIL IES O N L IN E NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 2. Outline• Digital Age• Understanding digital culture• Define Success• What’s needed?• Generation Safe
  • 3. Digital Age• Youth live out their lives online.• Parents and youth have very different relationships with technology.
  • 4. Facts and Figures about Online Safety NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 5. Facts About Our Digital World Today, youth spend 7.5 hours/day with technology and media 7 days/week That’s 52.5 hours/week! Or…227.5 hours/month Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8-to 18-Year- Olds (2010)
  • 6. Facts About Our Digital World In ranking problems at school 76 % ofEducatorshave placed CYBERBULLYING ABOVE: Smoking “Cyberbullying- Parents and Educators Drugs are Concerned but not a Top Priority” (2010)
  • 7. Facts About Our Digital World• 95% of teens are online• 80% of online teens use social media• 88% of social media-using teens have witnessed cruelty on social network sites. Lenhart ,Madden, Smith, Purcell, Zickuhr, Rainie (2011)
  • 8. Facts About Our Digital World• 15% of social media-using teens have been the target of online meanness.• 19% of teens have been bullied in the past year either in person, online, by text, or by phone. Lenhart ,Madden, Smith, Purcell, Zickuhr, Rainie (2011)
  • 9. Defining SuccessSuccess = Youth become full digital citizens: Ethical Responsible Resilient
  • 10. October 2011 Microsoft’s Computing Safety Index On a scale from 0 – 100 Five- Country U.S. Average All Consume 34 37 rs Educators 32 39 Parents 33 36
  • 11. Computing Safety Index
  • 12. Strategies for Parents3 KEEPs for Parents™  Keep Current  Keep Communicating  Keep Checking
  • 13. Digital Drama• ―The Drama! Teen Conflict, Gossip, and Bullying in Networked Publics‖ - Study by: DanahBoyd and Alice Marwick
  • 14. Digital DramaCase Study• Jamey Rodemeyer- 14 year-old boy who committed suicide after being bullied by classmates. Marwick &boyd (2011)
  • 15. Digital Drama• According to teenagers, bullying is something that happens only in elementary or middle school.• ―There’s no bullying at this school‖ was a regular response. Marwick &boyd (2011)
  • 16. Digital DramaDefining ―Drama‖ Drama connotes a combination of conflict and attention that often involves social media sites. Marwick &boyd (2011)
  • 17. Digital DramaDrama as practice Performativity Attention Status Entertainment Marwick &boyd (2011)
  • 18. Digital Drama• Drama lets teens conceptualize and understand how their social dynamics have changed with the emergence of social media. Marwick &boyd (2011)
  • 19. Digital Drama• Successful anti-bullying efforts empower victims• Interventions must focus on positive concepts, such as healthy relationships and digital citizenship. Marwick &boyd (2011)
  • 20. Managing Digital Interactions • Relationships • Reputation • Resiliency
  • 21. Managing Digital Interactions Relationships  Appropriate Contact  Appropriate Content  Appropriate Conduct
  • 22. Managing Digital Interactions Reputation  Online reputation as an asset rather than a liability  Permanent Digital Footprint
  • 23. Managing Digital Interactions Resiliency- Strategies for Helping Manage exposure to hurtful, unhealthy, or traumatic content Manage privacy (settings and apps) Secure data and devices
  • 24. Managing Digital Interactions Resiliency- Manage Exposure Communicate your expectations for content. Use filters and parental controls. Teach strategies—how to react.
  • 25. WHAT’S NEEDED?PreventionDetectionIntervention NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 26. DETECTION“We are missing vital clues…” NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 27. Goal for Success Whole school involvement Heightened awareness Organized reporting of all digital incidents NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 28. Recognize Behavioral Indicators Refusing to go to school Suspicious bruises Damage to personal belongings Sleeping difficulties Tense or tearful NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 29. Create A Network of SupportStudents need a strong network of support thatincludes all stakeholders in the community—parents, law enforcement, and school staff. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 30. Build Positive School ClimateBe presentApproach bullying as cry for helpClearly identify unacceptable behaviorTeach students to create own environmentPay attention NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 31. Take Advantage of Generation Safe™ Tools:36% of teachers RECEIVED NO TRAININGby their school districts in issues related to onlinesafety, security and ethics in the past year. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 32. Generation Safe Overview Resource Library and 360 Self Assessment Incident Response ToolProfessional Development & Flowchart (IRT) NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 33. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 34. Generation Safe “. . . Ensuring that our students have a safe learning environment is paramount. I believe that Generation Safe™ finally provides a comprehensive framework . . .” Joel Hamas Senior Director, Instructional Technology Tamalpais Union High School District NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 35. Generation Safe “The Generation Safe™ suite . . . allows us to take a proactive rather than a reactive position with regards to technology in learning.” “As a principal, . . . I rely on the interactive investigation tools made available through the Generation Safe™ 360 Self Assessment and resource documents.” Steve Giles Principal, Riverton Elementary School Jordan School District, Utah NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 36. Venn Diagram NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 37. INCIDENT RESPONSE TOOL (IRT) & FLOWCHART NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 38. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 39. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 40. Learning Modules NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 41. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 42. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 43. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 44. Screen shot of flowchart screen with mouse rollover NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 45. Screen shot of browse detailed instructions NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 46. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 47. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 48. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 49. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 50. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 51. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 52. Download Docs for Interviews NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 53. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 54. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 55. Follow up forms NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 56. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 57. Generic Forms NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 58. Today’s Activity: Scenario Responseo Each group will respond to a different scenario and document their processo Each group should consider these roles o The First Responder o who discovers/is made aware of a potential issue o The Administrator o who heads the investigation o The Victim/The Offender/The Bystander o The Parents o Law Enforcement o The Community-at-large, including the Press
  • 59. Today’s Activity: Scenario Responseo What steps does the first responder take once he/she is aware of an incident? o What are the key issues that need to be considered? o How long does this process take? o What tools does he/she use? Why?o What steps does the Administrator take once he/she is notified of an incident? o What are the key issues that need to be considered? o How long does this process take? o What tools does he/she use? Why?
  • 60. Group Activity: Share Responses o Which tools did you use? o Why or why not? o How were they affective? o Or not? o What special circumstances dictated your response? o What do we teachers need to know?
  • 61. Generation Safe Scenario #1 o Before school, a female student, Julie, sends a picture of herself, with her shirt unbuttoned revealing her bra, to her boyfriend, John. Julie goes to class, only to discover that John has forwarded the picture to his friend, Matt, who in turn, has sent the email to other students. Students in the class begin to make inappropriate comments to Julie about her picture. Other students shake their heads in disgust. It seems as though every student in the class is receiving the picture via a text message. The teacher, Mr. Canon, receives the picture too.
  • 62. Generation Safe Scenario #2 o Students in Ms. House’s class are allowed to use their personal cell phones during class as student responders or for research. Not every student has a personal device, so they share. Steve and Karen share Steve’s phone, and are working on a project together. At recess, Karen tells other students that Steve is using his phone to cheat, and a group of students begin taunting Steve. The Noon Duty Supervisor sees the commotion, asks what is going on, and confiscates Steve’s phone. Unfamiliar with his iPhone, she begins to search Steve’s email, his pictures, his tweets, his apps, and his text messages.
  • 63. Generation Safe Scenario #3 o Miss Smith is a new teacher in Probationary status. She teaches 6th-8th grade honors Social Science. Miss Smith has created a Moodle site for her students to access their assignments and homework. There is a monitored discussion that is used by all of her students. Miss Smith also has a link to her Facebook account on Moodle. She uses this Facebook account for educational purposes only, and has a separate personal account. The privacy settings on her personal FB account are set to ―Public‖. On her personal FB account, Miss Smith posts pictures of herself, wearing an OPUSD sweatshirt, and her friends drinking and partying in Las Vegas this past weekend. When Miss Smith goes to class on Monday, she sees comments in the Moodle discussion, referring to her fun weekend, in her school FB account, so she deletes the pictures.
  • 64. Generation Safe Scenario #4 o Jason, a senior, has excellent grades. His parents expect him to attend a top tier college. Jason applies to, and is accepted at Stanford, with a full academic scholarship. Prior to graduation, it is discovered by the IT Department that Jason has sent out fraudulent emails to teachers to get their login passwords, logged in as teachers and changed not only his grades, but the grades of other students. One of the other students is a girl, Jennifer, that Jason likes. Jennifer is unaware that Jason has been changing her grades.
  • 65. Generation Safe Scenario #5 o Mr. Jones teaches fifth grade. Several middle students, Tom, Joe, and Ben, are siblings of students in his class. Tom, Joe, and Ben create a teacher Facebook fan page, posing as Mr. Jones. Mr. Jones is unaware of the site. They post pictures from Mr. Jones’ Tea Party play on the site. These pictures are ―liked‖ by many students in his class. Tom, Joe, and Ben also post a picture of Mary falling down on the playground, The caption on the picture is, ―Dumbbell, dumbbell all fall down.‖ The next week, they post an altered picture of Mary coming out of the boy’s bathroom; the caption is, ―Dumbbell doesn’t know if she’s a boy or a girl. Over the course of the next week, they continue to post inappropriate pictures of Mary. The other students begin to taunt Mary to the point that Mary stops going to school. Mr. Jones calls Mary’s parents to see why she is not at school, and becomes aware of the fake site.
  • 66. RESOURCE LIBRARY AND IKEEPCURRENT NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 67. P/D/I NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 68. Articles around current digital news NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 69. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 70. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 71. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 72. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 73. Stakeholder drop down NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 74. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 75. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 76. Committee Activity NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 77. 360 SELF ASSESSMENT NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 78. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 79. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 80. Medal Qualifications Bronze: Commit to improve the school by registering for the 360 Self Assessment. Silver: Record a score of Level 2 or higher in any Aspect and reach the benchmark in half of all Aspects Gold: Complete the 360 Self Assessment, meet the benchmark level for all Aspects. Submit “evidence.” Platinum: Receive onsite iKeepSafe Assessor, prepare portfolio of accomplishments, and mentor another school in the Generation Safe Program. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 81. Printable version front cover NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 82. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 83. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 84. NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 85. 360 of the Digital Citizenship Improvement Actions NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 86. Schoolreports NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 87. Districtreports NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 88. Interactive Group Activity NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 89. 360 Self Assessment for your School. . . Managing User Accounts NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 90. Inspiring Change in School Culture "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, concerned citizens can change the world. Indeed it is the only thing that ever has.” Margaret Mead Academic Anthropologist NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 91. Debrief What do you know?What do you need to know?What can IKSC do for you? NEW MEDIA MENTOR FOR DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
  • 92. Q&A MARSALI HANCOCK iKeepSafe.org GenerationSafe.iKeepSafe.org info@ikeepsafe.orgPEACE OF MIND FOR FAMILIES ONLINE