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NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014
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NAESP Conference - July 12, 2014

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  • Learning how to balance the time spent online and connected with all of life’s other activities a challenge in the digital age. But, it is important – spending too much time online can take away from real world experiences.

    Kids spend more time engaged with media than they do in any activity other than sleeping.

    Recent studies indicate, for instance, that 8 year olds spend as many hours engaged with various screens as they do in school and pre-schoolers are spending about 4 hours per day on media (TV, tablets, etc)

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends limiting screen time to two hours per day and creating an “electronic media free” environment in children’s bedrooms.

    Setting limits and discussing the benefits of screen-free time is important.

    But equally important is the way adults behave. Research shows that adult behavior affects how youth conduct their online lives. So, it is important for us to be mindful of the message we are sending – are we looking at our phone while our kids are talking to us or while we are at the dinner table, for example.

    Achieving a healthy balance between all of our activities
  • The online world is full of ethical decisions

    Should I upload or forward this unflattering picture of my friend; should I download this music even though I haven’t paid for it;

    While these questions are challenging for adults, imagine how tricky they are for young people who are still developing the cognitive skills required for ethical decision-making.

    By talking together with youth about plagiarism, piracy, hacking, being an up stander, we can help young people understand that consequences of decisions they make in the online environment.
  • Understanding what personal information is safe to share online and what is not is a critical component of being digitally literate.

    79% of teens think their friends share too much personal info online. (CSM STUDY)

    At an early age, it is important to discuss the difference between personal and public information

    As the child gets older, reinforcing that message is important along with explaining the nuances between public and private sharing.

    For example, starting the conversation in simple, nonjudgmental contexts (such as, “what is the best way to express to someone that you have a great vacation? Let’s talk about why someone might not want you to put that message (even when done with the best intentions) on their Facebook page. How about sending them a text? Or speaking with them on the phone?)

    Understanding the relationship between technology, personal privacy and being a responsible steward of information is extremely important.
  • Today, young people connect emotionally on their digital devices. Any parent with a phone bill knows this is true – Teens send an average of 3400 texts per month!

    The really good news is that 70 percent of people worldwide say that the internet has improved their relationships. In addition, the vast majority of kids’ online relationships are with people they already know and in general, time spent online does not mean they are spending less face to face time with their friends. Social media, it turns out, actually facilitates offline interactions.

    But, occasionally unhealthy or even dangerous relationships can develop. In addition, the potential access to sexually explicit content can affect youths’ ability to form and maintain healthy relationships.

    Communicating with youth about how to use their digital communications to enhance their relationships while avoiding the risks.
  • Everything we post online and everything that others post about us contributes to a digital reputation.

    It is important to help kids understand that everything online is persistent, searchable, replicable and can be viewed far beyond the intended audience.

    Helping youth understand that being vigilant about our online interactions is instrumental to developing a positive or negative reputation.

    And your online reputation matters. One study indicated that 70% of human resource professionals have rejected an applicant based on something they found online.

    One piece of advice we’ve found is that it is also important to not simply eschew digital technology because, that means any information about you is what others are saying. We want youth to be empowered to take control of their reputation.

    Want to be viewed as a serious academic? Blog about a math problem you are working on or a book you are reading;
    Want to be viewed as creative? Post your art; Take online art classes

    IKS wants to empower youth to take control of their reputation
  • Transcript

    • 1. TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM: BUILDING A FOUNDATION FOR SUCCESS Nancy Gifford Senior Director of Law & Policy The Internet Keep Safe Coalition
    • 2. About iKeepSafe • a nonprofit, international alliance of more than 100 policy leaders, educators, law enforcement members, technology experts, public health experts and advocates. • Leader in research and tracking global trends and issues surrounding connected technology and their effect on children.
    • 3. iKeepSafe’s Mission To see generations of the world’s children grow up safely using technology and the internet.
    • 4. Technology in the Classroom: Building a Foundation for Success • Policies and Administrative Considerations to protect the privacy of student data • Core competencies for ethically and responsibly engaging with technology
    • 5. Elements of a Comprehensive Student Data Privacy Program • Identify and minimize risks of mishaps • Have clear polices that are kept up to date • Create an incident response plan • Train employees • Educate students and parents
    • 6. Identify Risks • Privacy Assessment • Establish an e-safety committee (or a subcommittee of your safety committee) • Dedicate a privacy point person (for offline and online information distribution)
    • 7. Elements of a Comprehensive Student Data Privacy Program • Identify and minimize risks of mishaps • Have clear polices that are kept up to date • Create an incident response plan • Train employees • Educate staff, students and parents
    • 8. CLEAR POLICIES AND PROCEDURES • Notice • Confidentiality and Disclosures • Security • Changes • Training
    • 9. Privacy Policies • Sharing personal data with 3rd parties • Use of technology: • School administrators use • Educator use • School websites
    • 10. Is my school compliant with all of the regulations around data sharing? • FERPA • COPAA • CIPA • PPRA • HIPPA • Applicable state laws • District Policies
    • 11. Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act • FERPA • mandates that schools must keep educational records confidential and that student data can only be used for educational purposes. Using student data to sell or market products is prohibited. • Changes are being considered (Sen. Markey)
    • 12. Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act • COPPA • Mandates operators of websites or online services directed to children obtain verifiable parental consent before collecting, using or disclosing personal info of children under 13 • School may provide consent in some circumstances
    • 13. Child Internet Protection Act • CIPA • Requires schools that use software or technology to block access to inappropriate materials • Safety education requirement • Tied to e-Rate Funding
    • 14. The Protection of Pupil Rights Act • PPRA • Protects the privacy of students in surveys, medical exams and marketing. • Has Opt-in and Opt-out requirements that schools must comply with.
    • 15. Elements of a Comprehensive Student Data Privacy Program • Identify and minimize risks of mishaps • Have clear polices that are kept up to date • Create an incident response plan • Train employees • Educate students and parents
    • 16. Incident Response Plan – Digital incident response plan • Cyberbullying • Sexting • Harassment – Data security breach response plan • Hacking • Accidental or negligent disclosures
    • 17. Civil Liberties The First Amendment • Balancing a robust expression of ideas while restricting those communications that invade others’ privacy, are defamatory, contribute to a hostile environment or otherwise cause harm.
    • 18. Civil Liberties The Fourth Amendment • Searching & seizing electronic Devices • BYOD, school-provided devices, cell phones, laptops, e-readers • What are your school policies around electronic devices?
    • 19. Elements of a Comprehensive Student Data Privacy Program • Identify and minimize risks of mishaps • Have clear polices that are kept up to date • Create an incident response plan • Train employees • Educate students and parents
    • 20. Training Elements of a training program: • Basic privacy awareness • Privacy rights & responsibilities • Data security • Online communication & social media • Electronic searches, surveillance, & access
    • 21. Elements of a Comprehensive Student Data Privacy Program • Identify and minimize risks of mishaps • Have clear polices that are kept up to date • Create an incident response plan • Train employees • Educate students and parents
    • 22. Educate Students and Parents • Clear policies • Clear process
    • 23. ROADMAP Download the Roadmap for Schools at: iKeepSafe.org/roadmap Or email: info@ikeepsafe.org
    • 24. Digital Citizenship
    • 25. At what age does cyberbullying start? . . . digital piracy (illegally downloading movies and music)?
    • 26. BE a PRO The Free App for Parents

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