BEaPRO Presentation: Lafayette Elementary

899 views
814 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
899
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
369
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Here’s a quick video to show us how kids are using their connected technology.

    [Play video.]
     
    What stood out to you in that video? . . . What did you notice? . . . Is this what you’re kids are experiencing?
    [Take response.]
  • This is good news for parents. Kids are looking to us more than their peers or anyone else for guidance on their digital devices. What that means for us is, we don’t need to be shy about communicating our expectations — our kids are looking for this kind of guidance and need it more than ever. It also means our example really counts.
  • Frontal Lobe doesn’t develop until early 20s.
  • Many students are reticent to admit that they are being bullied — online or offline. Recent research by Danah Boyd found evidence that students in a particular high school were in fact being cyberbullied. Yet, when she asked the students what they thought, they denied that there was any cyberbullying. The students called it, “drama.”

    Source: [Marwick, Alice E. and boyd, danah, The Drama! Teen Conflict, Gossip, and Bullying in Networked Publics (September 12, 2011). A Decade in Internet Time: Symposium on the Dynamics of the Internet and Society, September 2011. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1926349]

    This is Part one of a four part series on cyberbullying. It has excellent information on what constitutes cyberbullying, how to recognize it, prevent it, and manage cyberbullying situations. You can find these online at the Verizon website.

    [NOTE to presenter: Depending on what you consider to be relevant for your student body, you may want to select another video to play.]

    Part 1: Is Your Child Being Cyberbullied?
    Part 2: When Does "Rude" Cross the Line, Online?
    Part 3: Why Kids Cyberbully - Recognizing Differences
    Part 4: Understanding and Preventing Cyberbullying - The Family Approach
  • Danah Boyd NYU research Professor
    Cyberbullying = DRAMA
    = use your child’s terminology
  • 30-Second PSA: “Think Before You Post” (Meredith Salenger) — This PSA shows how kids’ online behavior might look coming from a parent. (Embarrassed?) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2r2jNCyuV6U

    [Play video.]
    What did you think of that? . . . Kids, how would you like your mom to be posting online like this?


    ALTERNATE VIDEO 30-Second PSA (more serious): “Think Before You Post” (Anti-sexting) —This shows how creepy it can get when you put too much personal information online. [Play from YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4w4_Hrwh2XI]
  • Youth are living out their lives online. What they do in the digital environment affects how they feel about themselves and the relationships around them. What they post and how they communicate impacts their future academic and employment opportunities.
     
    YOUTH:

    Technology is a lifestyle. They emotionally connect with each other through their digital devices and web platforms.
    They are emotionally connected THROUGH their technology.
    They use these platforms to define their relationships and live out their lives in the digital environment.
    What youth do with their digital devices affects how they feel about themselves and the relationships around them.
     
    It is important to recognize that adults and youth have different relationships with digital technology.

    PARENTS:

    Technology is a TOOL.
    It is not necessarily the vehicle that makes them feel more loved or close to someone.
    Technology is something that is used for efficiency, to enhance their offline lives.
    This is why, as caring adults, we need to be in this space.


  • Someone else using your Social Security number means the theft of your identity, and almost always, it indicates debt in your name. Often, it’s massive debt that no one knows about until the child applies for student loans for college. Ten percent represents a massive hassle for the victims.
  • Steering Clear of Cyber Tricks
    This video is appropriate for younger audiences and covers concepts of ETHICAL USE (avoiding piracy) and ONLINE SECURITY (safe downloading). It is available for download for educational use at the iKeepSafe YouTube channel.

    Download and embed in this slide: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1xFUw3bW10
  • VIDEO: Paw Goes and the Dangerous Download
    This video is appropriate for younger audiences and covers concepts of ETHICAL USE (avoiding piracy) and ONLINE SECURITY (safe downloading). It is available for download for educational use at the iKeepSafe YouTube channel.

    Download and embed in this slide: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1xFUw3bW10
  • Online security begins with strong passwords. A weak password can create vulnerabilities for everyone. Help kids understand the importance of strong passwords.

    [Do a demonstration.]

    Use the first letter of the opening words of a favorite song. Make sure one of your letters is a capital. Substitute a number for a letter. Add a symbol.


  • Online security begins with strong passwords. A weak password can create vulnerabilities for everyone. Help kids understand the importance of strong passwords.

    [Do a demonstration.]

    Use the first letter of the opening words of a favorite song. Make sure one of your letters is a capital. Substitute a number for a letter. Add a symbol.


    I love my daughter, Hailey,

    i<3md,H,4eVr

  • Here’s an introduction to the BE a PRO concepts of digital citizenship.

    [Play video.]
     
    What stood out to you in that video? [Take response.]
  • BEaPRO Presentation: Lafayette Elementary

    1. 1. Emily Ensign Dir. of Content Development iKeepsafe
    2. 2. 2iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL OPENING ACTIVITY Break into small groups. Discuss your children’s technology use and share: • Three trends you’ve noticed • Two concerns you have • One question you hope to have answered
    3. 3. 3iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL YOUTH AND CONNECTED DEVICES How many hours per day do kids spend with digital devices—cell phones, computers, iPods, iPads, tablets, gaming?
    4. 4. 4iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL YOUTH AND CONNECTED DEVICES • 7.5 hours a day • 7 days a week • 52.5 hours a week Kaiser Family Foundation study: "Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8- to 18-Year-Olds," January 2010.
    5. 5. 5iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL WHAT KIDS ARE DOING ONLINE
    6. 6. 6iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL PARENTS ARE THE KEY New research: kids look to parents above any other source for their connected/mobile behaviors. [Lenhart, A., et. al., “Teens, kindness and cruelty on social networks.” Pew Internet & American Life Project, 2011.]
    7. 7. 7iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL DEFINING SUCCESS • Ethical • Responsible • Resilient
    8. 8. ALANCE THICS RIVACY EPUTATION & RELATIONSHIPS NLINE SECURITY B E A P R O Digital Citizenship is:
    9. 9. ALANCEB GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA) falls __ for each hour per day that a student averaged with digital media.
    10. 10. 10iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL BALANCE GPA falls .05 for each hour per day that a student averaged with digital media. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, “Facebook, texting help Freshmen Students,” October, 2010.
    11. 11. 11iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL BALANCE The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that parents limit screen time (TV, computer, etc.) to: • ?_ hrs/day for children under two • ?_ hrs/day for children over two Pediatrics: "Adolescents Living the 24/7 Lifestyle: Effects of Caffeine and Technology on Sleep Duration and Daytime Functioning," February 2009.
    12. 12. 12iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL BALANCE AAP Recommendations: • Children under 2 years: 0 hrs/day (No TV or computers!) • Children over 2 years: 1‒ 2 hrs/day Pediatrics: "Adolescents Living the 24/7 Lifestyle: Effects of Caffeine and Technology on Sleep Duration and Daytime Functioning," February 2009.
    13. 13. 13iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL Create an “electronic media free” environment in children’s bedrooms • Kids who sacrifice sleep time for screen time are at a greater risk for sleep disorders, mood swings, anxiety and depression • Log off a few hours before bed • Consider charging phones in central location or contact your carrier to turn off texting and phone service during certain hours
    14. 14. 14iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL BALANCE Set Limits: Directly involve your kids Both sides should benefit Write it out Sign and hang up
    15. 15. THICSE At what age does cyberbullying and digital piracy (illegally downloading movies and music) start?
    16. 16. 16iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL ETHICS • Cyberbullying begins in 2nd grade1 • Piracy begins in 4th grade1 • Hacking begins in 7th grade1 • Most young people are devoid of ethical thinking or consideration for others when using the web2 1. Rochester Institute of Technology, 2008. 2. Harvard School of Education, “Good Play Project”, 2008.
    17. 17. 17iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL ETHICAL USE — CYBERBULLYING
    18. 18. 18iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL ETHICS Use your children’s terminology Online communities are everyone’s business: • Upstander vs. bystander • Report bad behavior
    19. 19. 19iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL ETHICS 19 Whether or not downloading music and movies is illegal depends on the particular copyright attached to it. Go to a trustworthy sites… Movies: stream shows from legal sites such as network television stations websites (CBS, Fox, NBC, and ABC), or rent/buy movies online through authorized vendors and dealers like Amazon, Unbox, Netflicks, and iTunes. Also, because sites like Yahoo! and MySpace have developed relationships with movie studios, they are sometimes able to show clips or even full-length versions of films.
    20. 20. 20iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL ETHICS 20 Music: iTunes, 7digital, Napster, Amazon, Playlouder, HMV, and Virgin. Pandora Radio streams music for free and provides links for legal downloads. Sometimes it’s difficult for children to understand the legal protection that copyrights offer products and to realize the serious consequences they may face for downloading illegal material.
    21. 21. RIVACY Do young people think their friends share too much personal information online? P “Online Privacy: What Does It Mean to Parents and Kids?," Common Sense Media, 2010, www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/privacypoll.pdf.
    22. 22. 22iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL PRIVACY—STATS Most of them do. 79% of youth think their friends share too much personal info online. “Online Privacy: What Does It Mean to Parents and Kids?," Common Sense Media, 2010, www.commonsensemedia.org/sites/default/files/privacypoll. pdf.
    23. 23. 23iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL PRIVACY — THINK BEFORE YOU POST
    24. 24. 24iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL PRIVACY 24 Because everything online is potentially viewable to anyone with Internet access, it’s important for parents to be aware of what information is being posted by or about their child in order to protect their child’s personal and financial privacy.
    25. 25. ELATIONSHIPS How many text messages does an average teen send per month? R
    26. 26. RELATIONSHIPS Average teen sends 3,400 texts per month—seven messages per waking hour.1 1. Nielsen Wire, 2011. 2. Ann Collier, “Teens’ social media experiences largely positive: Study,” NetFamilyNews.org., November 10, 2011, http://www.netfamilynews.org/?p=30933.
    27. 27. • Youth live out their lives online. • Adults and youth have very different relationships with technology. RELATIONSHIPS
    28. 28. ACTIVITY: Connecting through technology • Play one of your child’s favorite online games with them • Connect with a loved one through technology • Use online search tools and map features to share your childhood home or birthplace with your child • Role-play together the different ways that your child can respond when they see cruelty online. Discover how to report abuse on platforms like Facebook, YouTube and Twitter RELATIONSHIPS
    29. 29. • 70% percent of people worldwide say that the Internet has improved their relationships • Has the internet improved your family’s relationships? RELATIONSHIPS
    30. 30. • Harmful content impacts a child’s ability to form and maintain healthy relationships • Protect kids from: – Pornography – Violence – Hate speech – Promotion of eating disorders (Ana/Mia) RELATIONSHIPS
    31. 31. EPUTATION What percentage of HR professionals/recruiters have rejected an application based on information they found online? R
    32. 32. • 70% percent of HR professionals (people hiring) have rejected an applicant based on something they found online • There is no delete button on the Internet! REPUTATION
    33. 33. NLINE SECURITY Take a guess — what percentage of children have someone else using their Social Security number? O Power, Richard, "Child Identity Theft: New Evidence Indicates Identity Thieves are Targeting Children for Unused Social Security Numbers," 2011, http://www.cylab.cmu.edu/files/pdfs/reports/2011/child-identity-theft.pdf.
    34. 34. 35iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL ONLINE SECURITY • A recent study found that more than 10% of children had someone else using their Social Security number – 51 times higher than adults in the same • That’s 4,311 out of 40,000 child identities scanned [Power, R. (2011). Child Identity Theft: New Evidence Indicates Identity Thieves are Targeting Children for Unused Social Security Numbers. Retrieved from http://www.cylab.cmu.edu/files/pdfs/reports/2011/child-identity-theft.pdf]
    35. 35. 36iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL ONLINE SECURITY
    36. 36. 37iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL ONLINE SECURITY http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1xFUw3bW10 http://tinyurl.com/nck9cy5
    37. 37. 38iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL ONLINE SECURITY General Tips: •Teach kids to listen to their “internal-creep-o-meter” •Read privacy/policy fine print •Use strictest privacy settings on social media platforms •Use discretion when downloading apps onto mobile phones •Passwords, passwords, passwords
    38. 38. 39iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL ONLINE SECURITY — PASSWORDS COUNT How to make a strong password that’s easy to remember: • Use a favorite song • Substitute numbers for letters • Add a symbol: • <3 for love • @ for a • 1 for L • 5 for S
    39. 39. 40iKeepSafe.org CONFIDENTIAL BE A PRO ONLINE
    40. 40. For more information about how you can download our free eBook at www.ikeepsafe.org/google and also visit, www.ikeepsafe.org/be-a-pro/info/.

    ×