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Liberalism - IEHEI students 2010-2011
 

Liberalism - IEHEI students 2010-2011

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This is the first presentation of Yasmin Capitaine and Emilio Romero García in the course

This is the first presentation of Yasmin Capitaine and Emilio Romero García in the course

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    Liberalism - IEHEI students 2010-2011 Liberalism - IEHEI students 2010-2011 Presentation Transcript

    • LIBERALISM Introduction to Liberal Internationalism and Democratic Peace Proposition International Relations 14 October 2010 Nice ­ FRANCE Yasmin Capitaine   Emilio Romero García  
    • Liberalism  Dichotomy in class: realism and liberalism  Authors  Main points:  Liberal internationalism  Democratic peace proposition  Discussion: for or against?  Conclusions    
    • Dichotomy: liberalism  Definition of realism: practical appliance  Definition of realism: practical appliance  Definition of liberalism: follow the utopia  Is it better to follow ideals?    
    • Authors  Fukuyama  Paine  Doyle  Russett  Kant  Rawls  Rousseau  Mueller  Cobden  Ricardo   Schumpeter  Mill  Howard  Angell    
    • Liberal internationalism Origins  XVIII and XIX: ”Liberals proposing  preconditions for a peaceful world order (…) for  the elimination of war.” (in the class copies)    
    • Liberal preconditions  Democracy  Free trade  Collective security    
    • Liberal preconditions  DEMOCRACY  War is not of human nature  Warrior class invented war  Ideals like individual rights, freedom of speech,  liberty... conform the liberal state  Snowball effect of liberal states    
    • Liberal preconditions  FREE TRADE  Trade creates necessities, that join all actors in  the (international) transactions  Without commerce societies miss the facilities  obtained  Trade promotes peace    
    • Liberal preconditions  COLLECTIVE SECURITY  Requieres a degree of mutual confidence    
    • Liberalism  Further in this chapter... The economic dimension Polanyi's critique: material self­gain, laissez­faire, economics split from politics* Free trade imperialism: another way to exploit Liberalism and Globalisation New phase of capitalism or a world less open and globalised? The nature of free trade Sovereignty and foreign investment    
    • Liberalism Democratic Peace Proposition  Let's assume democracies rarely make war  Dyads of democracies ­ Individual states  ...criticised by Small and Singer  Process of democratization  Conflict in the short term and peace in the long term    
    • Liberalism Democratic Peace Proposition  Theories of the Dyadic Democratic Peace  Cultural explanations  Explanation by structure  Two levels of decision making: National and international  (Bueno de Mesquita and Lalman, 1992)  ...possible only with transparency  Historical satisfaction with international status quo    
    • Liberalism Democratic Peace Proposition  Elaborations of the DPP:  Democracies join democracies (Mousseau)  Autocracies do with autocracies (Werner and  Lemke)  Covert intervention: Nicaragua  Democracies are more likely to settle disputes  peacefully and less likely to initiate them    
    • Liberalism Democratic Peace Proposition  Why do Democracies win the wars they fight?  Because of the citizens' participation in the  democratic process (Russet, 1993)  Because they choose only wars they are likely to  win (Reiter and Stam, 1998)  The longer it lasts, the less likely they are to triumph    
    • Liberalism Democratic Peace Proposition  Are Democracies more likely to use force for  domestic political advantage?  No evidence to support this    
    • Liberalism Democratic Peace Proposition  Civil wars do not arise so often in Democracies    
    • Liberalism NOW, CURRENTLY    
    • Liberalism New international arena  Democracies are more peaceful because it  would be at the expense of those who would  fight it (Kant, Perpetual Peace)  European states are interdependent – war isn't  of economic interest (Angell, The Great Illusion)    
    • Liberalism New international arena  According to Liberalism statements, trade units  countries.   Some institutions promoting free trade are:  International Monetary Fund  World Trade Organisation (3 official languages, FR, EN,  ES)  United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (6  official languages, FR, EN, ES, Russian, Arabic and    Chinese)  
    • Liberalism New international arena List of main international banking institutions European Central Bank www.ecb.eu African Development Bank www.afdb.org Asian Development Bank www.adb.org Bank for International Settlements www.bis.org Bank of World Residence Program www.bwrp.org Caribbean Development Bank www.caribank.org Islamic Development Bank www.isdb.org World Bank www.worldbankgroup.org    
    • Liberalism New international arena  For security issues, NATO has an important  role in maintaining and promoting peace  Countries outside NATO are starting up new  military organisations  Asia Pacific Forum plays a role for Human Rights  Promotion  Asian Pacific ”NATO” is being discussed    
    • Liberalism New international arena  Russia and China (Brazil and India also) should  be incorporated into intergovernmental  organisations that create interdependence  The process of incorporation is currently taking place  The interdependence will bring about peace     
    • Liberalism New international arena Moral imperative: there is a dictate of reason Not following the moral law is self defeating and  thus contrary to reason.                                           Immanuel Kant