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Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
Milbergs Tuesday Group  Presentation 1.2   May 7 2010
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Milbergs Tuesday Group Presentation 1.2 May 7 2010

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Egils Milbergs presentation on the World\'s Largest Science and Innovation Park

Egils Milbergs presentation on the World\'s Largest Science and Innovation Park

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  • 1. The World’s Largest Science and Innovation Park Egils Milbergs Washington Economic Development Commission May 7, 2010 Tuesday Group Washington DC V.1.2
  • 2. A History of Innovation Commercial Airplanes COSTCO
  • 3. Geography of Knowledge Based Industries 2007 Total Metro Area Milken Institute Rank Score San Jose – 1 Sunnyvale-Santa 100.0 Clara, CA Seattle-Bellevue- 2 Everett, WA 46.4 Cambridge-Newton- 3 Framingham, MA 45.2 Washington- Arlington- 4 Alexandria, DC-VA- 41.8 MD-WV Los Angeles – Long 5 Beach – Glendale, 40.2 CA Dallas – Plano - 6 Irving, TX 21.8 San Diego – Carlsbad 7 – San Marcos, CA 19.3 Santa Ana – 8 Anaheim-Irvine, CA 17.7 New York – White 9 Plains – Wayne, NY- 16.8 NJ San Francisco – San 10 Mateo-Redwood 16.1 City, CA 4
  • 4. Seattle –King County 5 Source: Sommers,Beyers,Wenzl,Industry Cluster Analysis, 2008
  • 5. 6
  • 6. Geography of WA Unemployment (Mar. NSA)
  • 7. A New Innovation Growth Curve We are here PROSPERITY TIME
  • 8. Innovation is key to economic recovery 2000s Over half of Fortune 500 and just under half of 2008 Inc. list began during a recession or bear market. Advantage is Innovation Dane Stangler, Kauffman Foundation Strategy is “Make something new” 1980s & 1990s Advantage is Quality Strategy is 1960s & 1970s “Make it Better” Advantage is Cost There is no better time like Strategy is a downturn to innovate. “Make it Cheaper”
  • 9. The risks inherent to starting a thriving business in today’s troubled waters are immense, but the rewards have never been greater.
  • 10. The Commission’s Ten Year Vision We should not fear to lead Make Washington State the most attractive, creative and fertile investment environment for innovation in the world. …, we can’t rest on our laurels, so We must look over the horizon and let’s commit today to grooming a prepare for the new economy that workforce and leaders who are will emerge when this recession agile, creative, and embrace innovation. passes. Gov. Chris Gregoire Commerce Secretary Gary Locke March 10, 2009 March 18, 2009 11
  • 11. Innovation Policy Framework Talent Education Research Workforce Growth Skills Investment Employment Entrepreneurship Business Entrepre neurs Prosperity GSH Innovation Ecosystem Quality of Life Associations Competitiveness Capital Non- Infrastructure Gov’t Profits Innovation Innovation Innovation Drivers Ecosystem Outcomes 12
  • 12. Talent Challenge Egils Milbergs 13
  • 13. Investment Challenge Transforming ideas Into applications Creating business models Researchers and entrepreneurs create new ideas No capital No capital Firm creation Dead and innovation ideas success Dead firms Double “Valley of Death” Graphic concept adapted from Egils Milbergs Dr. Charles Wessner, National Academies 14
  • 14. Smarter, Cleaner, Greener Infrastructure Post “ICE” Age? Internal Combustion Engine Egils Milbergs 15
  • 15. Leg Notes WEDC 2010 Scorecard Action Talent & Workforce Retrain dislocated workers in high demand fields and occupations.. Deploy education and training resources to meet specific needs of employers Sustain the capacity of our higher education system Investment & Entrepreneurship Expand STARS program and strengthen Innovation Partnership Zones. Provide job creation incentives and integrated business services for small business. Compete for Federal R&D funds in strategic areas. Infrastructure Provide tax increment financing and other tools for local investment. Streamline the regulatory process for significant projects and small business Develop state-wide energy strategy and plan. Promote next generation broadband. Apply economic development criteria to transportation projects.
  • 16. New Model for Economic Development Traditional Model Innovation Driven Model Attract and retain companies Invest in talent, ideas and infrastructure Jobs Quality of jobs, per capita incomes Lowest cost of business inputs Higher value inputs, increasing productivity and outcomes Top down economic development Bottom-up and organic growth Competing regions: zero sum game Collaborating regions: value creation Closed linear innovation system Open innovation ecosystem Single disciplines, functions Multiple disciplines, integration Locally linked clusters Globally linked clusters Strategize Organize Operationize 17
  • 17. Source: Washington Technology Industry Association (WTIA) http://wtia.micromaps.com/
  • 18. Emergent Innovation Ecosystems (illustrative portfolio) SMART GRID/ RENEWABLE CLOUD COMPUTING ENERGY EFFICIENCY ENERGY ELECTRIC VEHICLE ADVANCED GLOBAL HEALTH INFRASTRUCTURE MANUCTURING HEALTH IT WATER RESOURCES/ NEW MATERIALS MEDICAL DEVICES ENVIRONMENT LOGISTICS/ DEFENSE FOOD PROCESSING FREIGHT MOBILITY TECHNOLOGY
  • 19. Global Health Ecosystem Ecosystem
  • 20. Innovation Ecosystems Evolve Innovation Ecosystem Innovation Accelerators Virtual Cluster Growth Node Many nodes Dense linkages Virtualized functions Talent Network to Network Nascent Cluster Accelerated IPZs collaboration STARS Few to many firms EIRs Fast growth Patents Key linkages None or few firms Incubators Growth potential Tax R&D Incentives Gap Funding SBIR 21
  • 21. Marine Agriculture, World’s Largest Innovation Park Food Tourism Composites Marine Energy Biomedical, “Twilight” IT, gaming, Incubators Aerospace simulation Food Processing, Life Sciences, Medical Rail Innovation Global Health Devices Defense Environment Remediation Wind, Solar, Clean IT Data Centers, Adv. Mfg. Electric Cars New Forestry Wine, Water Clean Tech, Smart Biotech, Energy, Semi- Grid, Biofuels conductors, Exports
  • 22. Extending the Innovation Ecosystem
  • 23. PNWER GDP and Population If PNWER were a separate country, it PNWER Region (GDP/Pop.) would rank 13th in total GDP State/Prov. GDP* Population Country GDP* 1. US 13,811,200 Wash. 311,270 6,468,424 2. Japan 4,376,705 Alberta 259,900 3,585,000 3. Germany 3,297,705 Oregon 158,233 3,790,060 4. China 3,280,053 B.C. 150,412 4,310,305 5. U.K. 2,727,806 6. France 2,562,288 Idaho 51,149 1,523,816 7. Italy 2,107,481 Sask. 40,340 1,008,697 8. Spain 1,429,226 Alaska 44,517 686,293 9. Canada 1,326,376 Montana 34,253 967,440 10. Brazil 1,314,170 Yukon 1,767 32,714 11. Russia 1,291,011 12. India 1,170,968 13. PNWER 1,051,841 Total 1,051,841 22,372,731 *2007 GDP in $US Million *2007 population & GDP in $US Million
  • 24. Your view of the Pacific Northwest economy in the next 24 months? A. Robust growth and 50% 43% outperforming national 39% 40% averages 30% 20% 17% B. Performance in line with 10% national economy trends 0% 0% C. Underperforming in most business sectors D. Don’t know 25
  • 25. Will innovation be more important in the next three decades than in the last three? 100% 91% A. Yes 80% B. No 60% 40% 20% 9% 0% Yes No 26
  • 26. Are there significant opportunities in cross border innovation and collaboration? 1. Yes 2. Maybe 80% 74% 3. No 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 22% 20% 10% 4% 0% 0% Yes Maybe No (4) 27
  • 27. Which areas offer the biggest opportunity for innovation collaboration? 1. Clean Energy 70% 65% 60% 2. Information Technology 50% 3. Health Services 40% 30% 17% 4. Communications 20% 9% 10% 4% 4% 5. Transportation/Logistics 0% 28
  • 28. What is the major factor limiting Pacific Northwest’s innovation performance? 1. Schools lagging in science and math education 2. Government not doing 30% 26% 26% enough to support 25% 22% technological innovation 20% 17% 3. Business not investing 15% 9% enough in technological 10% innovation 5% 0% 0% 4. Workers lacking skills to be technologically innovative 5. Don’t know 29
  • 29. What primary skills will children need to drive innovation in the future? 1. Math and science skills 70% 61% 60% 2. Creative approaches to 50% problem-solving 40% 30% 22% 3. Entrepreneurial and 20% 9% 4% 10% 4% business skills 0% 4. Knowledge of the world’s culture 30
  • 30. How effective are your innovation and R&D collaboration linkages with neighboring states/ provinces? 1. Absolutely great 50% 43% 40% 35% 2. Good 30% 3. Fair 17% 20% 4. Needs more attention 10% 4% 0% 5. Poor 0% 31
  • 31. What is the biggest hurdle in forging productive collaborations in the PNW? 1. Disseminating awareness of opportunities 2. Overcoming cultural, political, 35% 32% institutional rivalry 30% 27% 3. Finding funds for 25% 23% collaborative projects and 20% 14% ventures 15% 10% 5% 4. Removing specific policy and 5% regulatory barriers 0% 5. Adequately coordinating relevant stakeholders 32
  • 32. States and regions can be powerful players in the innovation economy • States, regions and smaller nations are: – Large enough to: • create intellectual capital • build innovation ecosystem(s) • connect globally • respond to innovation opportunities – Small enough for: • shared vision and achievable outcomes • trusted personal relationships • effective governance 33
  • 33. Considerations for organizing effective regional innovation ecosystems • make innovation a clear and central mission • focus on outcomes and local, organic growth • enhance the visibility of regional resources • adapt policy to different economic structures • enable regional leadership • maximize results through collaboration • rationalize government program structure • creatively leverage public sector programs • measure performance and outcomes
  • 34. Innovation Inputs Innovation Performance Investment Business Public Talent Entrepreneurship Infrastructure Performance Impact New Products R&D R&D State GDP Transportation & Services Personnel Intensity STEM Innovation Productivity Employment Broadband Proficiency Commercialization Growth Education Business Exports Standard Pipeline Start-ups Energy of living Workforce Capital Business Income Profitability Quality Access Climate Distribution Lifelong Inward Market State Sustainability Learning Investment Capitalization Revenues
  • 35. The best way to predict the future is to invent it.

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