Energy Conservation Project

  • 3,929 views
Uploaded on

Comparison between housing wood or fuel heating.

Comparison between housing wood or fuel heating.

More in: Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
3,929
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Wood vs. Fuel as Heating Source How much heating fuel can I save using a woodstove as additional heating source in my house? Energy Conservation Project by Emanuela Meriggi
  • 2. Wood or Fuel? Logs on Fire by Chris Campbell Firedance by Piddi77 The worldwide economic crisis and the rising cost of the fuel are the main reason why I wanted to investigate about the pros and cons of the use of wood or fuel as housing heating source.
  • 3. Data Analysis: problems
    • My data collection has been slightly compromised by the fact that I was not at home all the time for checking on the running time of the furnace.
    • Therefore I had to base my research on the information I have been able to collect during my time at home.
  • 4. How much fuel do I consume for heating my home? Time frame 10/13/2008 10/14/2008 10/15/2008 10/16/2008 10/17/2008 10/18/2008 10/19/2008 Minutes of running time for the furnace 54 50 45 52 60 138 156 Outside Average Temperature 43 °F /6 °C 42 °F / 5 °C 44 °F / 6 °C 43 °F / 6 °C 42 °F / 5 °C 41 °F / 5 °C 37 °F / 2 °C Initial inside temperature 61 °F / 16 °C 60 °F / 15 °C 62 °F / 16 °C 61 °F / 16 °C 60 °F / 16 °C 60 °F / 15 °C 59 °F / 15 °C Final inside temperature 71 °F / 21 °C 71 °F / 21 °C 70 °F / 20 °C 70 °F / 20 °C 71 °F / 20 °C 72 °F / 21 °C 73 °F / 22 °C Termostater set temperature 70 °F / 20 °C 70 °F / 20 °C 70 °F / 20 °C 70 °F / 20 °C 70 °F / 20 °C 72 °F / 21 °C 72 °F / 21 °C Gallons of fuel used (average) 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75 0.75
  • 5. How much wood do I consume for heating my home? Time frame 10/20/2008 10/21/2008 10/22/2008 10/23/2008 10/24/2008 10/25/2008 10/26/2008 Running time for the Woodstove (Hours) 6 6 6 6 6 12 10 Outside Average Temperature 40 °F / 4 °C 44 °F / 6 °C 42 °F / 5 °C 39 °F / 3 °C 36 °F / 2 °C 32 °F / 0 °C 32 °F / 0 °C Initial inside temperature 60 °F / 15 °C 62 °F / 16 °C 60 °F / 15 °C 60 °F / 15 °C 59 °F / 15 °C 57 °F / 14 °C 57 °F / 14 °C Final inside temperature 80 °F / 26 °C 81 °F / 26 °C 80 °F / 26 °C 78 °F / 25 °C 80 °F / 26 °C 84 °F / 28 °C 82°F / 27 °C Amount of split wood used 4 3 4 4 4 8 7
  • 6. Let’s look at the numbers! Fuel Consumption Wood Consumption Average final temperature: 71.1 F Average final temperature: 80.7 F This cost estimate is based on the market cost of a cord of wood at $260. In my case I collected the wood, so I had cost ZERO!  Estimate in 1 week: 5.25 gallons $22.83 Estimate in 1 month: 22.75 gallons $98.94 Estimate in 1 year: 273 gallons $1,187.28 Number of pieces of split wood used in 1 week: 34 $49.98 Estimate in 1 month:136 $199.92 Estimate in 1 year: 1632 $2,399.04
  • 7. Wait a second…
    • The numbers say that wood is twice as expensive than the fuel, is that correct?
    • It could if you would buy wood already split and dried it.
    • The cost of a dried and split cord is about $260 in Haines.
    • The cost would go
    • down if you buy rounds.
    • The wood is free if
    • you collect it yourself!
  • 8. Equivalent heat of wood and oil 1 Wood available heat at 20 percent moisture 7,000 Btu per pound (128 cubic feet with 80 cubic feet wood volume). 2 Number 2 fuel oil available heat 140,000 Btu per gallon. Wood 1 Available heat per cord in million Btu Number 2 Fuel oil 2 Gallons needed to equal cord Ash 23.6 168.6 Cottonwood 16.1 115.0 Maple (sugar) 25.0 178.6 Oak (red) 25.3 180.7 Oak (white) 27.0 192.9 Pine (shortleaf) 19.0 135.7 Walnut (black) 21.8 155.7
  • 9. Some Considerations…
    • Heating my home with oil is:
    • quick
    • expensive
    • doesn’t require physical work
    • depends on electricity
    • I never know how much oil I am using until I receive the bill
    • doesn’t depend on my presence
    • it is safe
    • uses limited resources (oil)
    • no “romance” in the baseboard heater!!!
    • Heating my home with wood is :
    • slow
    • potentially free
    • requires physical work
    • independent energy source
    • I have control on the amount of wood used as I use it
    • depends on my presence feeding the woodstove
    • it is a potential house hazard
    • uses renewable resources (wood)
    • the flames are very romantic!
  • 10. Conclusions
    • The statement “Heating my home with wood would definitely save a lot of money and fuel” would be true if:
    • I collect the wood
    • I am at home attending the woodstove
  • 11. Do I want to comply with the Ifs?
    • Yes!
    • Although I am glad to have a fuel heating system to keep mu house worm even when I am not there.
    • Indeed it would be quite more expensive if I had to replace all the frozen pipes when the woodstove is not burning.
  • 12. Something I have learned…
    • I found very interesting the chart with the list of various type of wood and their correspondent heating power.
    • Unfortunately the chart did not mention neither of the two most common wood here, birch and spruce.
    • I will look into it for finding out… which tree should I cut first in my yard?
  • 13. What’s next?
    • I would like to know more about woodstoves, which kind is the most efficient and why:
    • catalytic vs. traditional
    • cast iron vs. steel
  • 14. Resources
    • http://www.woodheat.org/firewood/firewoodbro.htm
    • http://extension.missouri.edu/explore/agguides/forestry/g05450.htm#two
    • http://www.alaskawoodheating.com/home_heating.php
    • http://www.anr.state.vt.us/site/html/reflect/oct9.htm
    • Photos from Flickr:
    • http://flickr.com/photos/piddysplace/53469314/
    • http://flickr.com/photos/cgc/83624045/in/photostream/
    • http://flickr.com/photos/mtsofan/2303197496/
    • http://flickr.com/photos/robbie1/6877884/sizes/l/