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Flipped Classroom Best Practices for Higher Ed (UB Tech 2014 Presentation)
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Flipped Classroom Best Practices for Higher Ed (UB Tech 2014 Presentation)

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This is the slide deck I used for my presentation "Flipped Classroom Success Stories (and How to Make Yours Happen!)" at UB Tech 2014. The final 15 or so slides offer resources for learning about the …

This is the slide deck I used for my presentation "Flipped Classroom Success Stories (and How to Make Yours Happen!)" at UB Tech 2014. The final 15 or so slides offer resources for learning about the specific Best Practices culled from the literature resources examined.

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  • 1. Flipped Classroom Success Stories (How to Make Yours Happen!) Kelly Walsh, CIO The College of Westchester
  • 2. Flipped Classroom Success Stories (How to Make Yours Happen!) Over 50,000 unique visitors a month! Come join tens of thousands of teachers, administrators, tech support staff, instructional designers, librarians, students, and others from across the spectrum of K to 16+ who read EmergingEdTech regularly Find EmergingEdTech on many of your favorite social media sites:
  • 3. Flipped Classroom Success Stories (How to Make Yours Happen!)
  • 4. Flipped Classroom Success Stories (… How to Make Yours Happen!) … Culled from Measured Successes of Flipped Teaching and Learning
  • 5. Flipped Classroom Success Stories (… How to Make Yours Happen!) What have schools and teachers done to succeed with Flipped Instruction? The body of literature offering documented evidence of improved learning outcomes is growing. What can we learn from those successful implementions?
  • 6. http://campustechnology.com/Articles/2014/05/21/Missouri-State- U-Improves-Learning-Outcomes-with-Flipped-Classroom.aspx
  • 7. Flipped Classroom Best Practices from … In 2010, public 4 year colleges and universities throughout the state of Missouri undertook a collaborative initiative with the goal of transformation courses and improving on student learning outcomes and reduce costs. Each school committed to redesigning one large enrollment course with poor learning outcomes or high ‘DFW’ rates (grades of D or F or Withdrawals). Universities engaged in a competitive process to determine which schools would redesign which courses. “The competitive process was intended to ensure that each university redesigned a different course — creating a pool of redesigned courses that universities could potentially share with each other.”
  • 8. Missouri State University was selected to redesign its Introductory Psychology course. They hoped to improve in the following issues: • A DFW rate around 24 percent • Modest student learning outcomes (approx. 30% improvement from pre-course-test to post-course-test scores). • Significant "course drift," with up to 18 sections a year taught by many different faculty members using different textbooks and vastly differing syllabi. Flipped Classroom Best Practices from …
  • 9. MEASURED RESULTS • There was a 76 percent improvement in pre-course-test to post-course-test scores • The DFW Rate was reduced from approx. 24% to 18.2%, a significant reduction “’When you think about it in terms of dollars and retention, that’s pretty significant’, said Hudson” (Danae Hudson, associate professor of psychology). Flipped Classroom Best Practices from …
  • 10. “We're flipped in that we assign homework and technology-based activities, so [students] have to do their online work before coming to class, and then in class we're able to focus more on activities, demonstrations and some lecture. But it's very much activity-based because they've actually done the work prior to coming to class and they're familiar with the content, said Hudson”. Practice - Using Class Time for Active Learning Flipped Classroom Best Practices from …
  • 11. The MSU model incorporated MyPsychLab, an online homework, tutorial and assessment tool from Pearson. “MyPsychLab provides individualized student data for instructors and individualized learning for students, two of the main criteria on the department's wish list. "I can see how much time students are spending in MyPsychLab. I can see how many attempts they've made on their post-test and a lot of other information that's useful for me as an instructor," said Hudson. The tool also lets instructors assign a study plan for students. "They take a pre-test, and based on their score it generates an individualized study plan for them so they don't have to spend time working on concepts they already understand," said Hudson.” Practice - Personalized Learning (with the help of a nice dose of Learning Analytics) Flipped Classroom Best Practices from …
  • 12. “MSU worked closely with Pearson to customize the textbook, MyPsychLab software and study plan. "We have customized almost everything we can customize to make it exactly what we want," said Hudson Practice - Customized Learning Materials Flipped Classroom Best Practices from …
  • 13. Best Practices culled from … A Review of Flipped Learning SUMMARY of Best Practices from … • Using Class Time for Active Learning • Personalized Learning • Customized Learning Materials
  • 14. Russell Mumper, Vice Dean of the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, teaches his “flipped” Pharmaceutics class. http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/09/the-post-lecture-classroom- how-will-students-fare/279663/
  • 15. Results • Student performance on an identical final exam improved by 2.5 percent between 2011 and 2012, and then by another 2.6 percent in 2013, providing an overall performance improvement of 5.1 percent between 2011 and 2013. • Students preferred the flipped model to the lecture model – 75 percent of students in 2012 said, before Mumper’s class, that they preferred lectures, whereas almost 90 percent of students said they preferred the flipped model after the class. Flipped Classroom Best Practices from …
  • 16. Flipped Classroom Best Practices from … “At home, before class, students watched brief lecture modules, which introduced them to the day’s content. They also read a textbook — the same, introductory-level book as in 2011 — before they arrived. When they got to class, Mumper would begin by asking them “audience response” questions. He’d put a multiple-choice question about the previous night’s lectures on a PowerPoint slide and ask all the students to respond via small, cheap clickers. He’d then look at their response, live, as they answered, and address any inconsistencies or incorrect beliefs revealed. Maybe 50 percent of the class got the wrong answer to one of these questions: This gave him an opportunity to lecture just enough so that students could understand what they got wrong.” Practice – Use Class Time to Review and Reinforce Learning Practice – Take Measures to Ensure Consumption of Content
  • 17. Clintondale High School http://flippedhighschool.com http://schoolsofthought.blogs.cnn.com/2012/01/18/my-view-flipped-classrooms-give- every-student-a-chance-to-succeed/
  • 18. “Every year, our failure rates [had] been through the roof. The students weren’t paying attention, they weren’t doing their homework, they were being disruptive, or they weren’t coming to school at all. Sadly, these issues are not that uncommon, particularly in this economic climate, where the percentage of students who fall into the poverty category is increasing by the day.” Flipped Classroom Best Practices from …
  • 19. Results • In the freshman class in the first flipped learning semester, the pass rate increased to 67 percent in English language arts, 69 percent in math, 78 percent in science, and 81 percent in social studies, representing an increase of 9 to 19 percentage points across the subjects. • Discipline referrals declined by 66 percent. • In 2012, although the graduating class had participated in the flipped learning model for only about six months, the graduation rate increased from 80 to 90 percent, college attendance jumped from 73 to 80 percent, and college readiness improved substantially. Flipped Classroom Best Practices from …
  • 20. “Our flipped school model is quite simple. Teachers record their lectures using screen-capture software (we use Camtasia) and post these lecture videos to a variety of outlets, including our school website, and YouTube. Students watch these videos outside of class on their smartphone, in the school computer lab (which now has extended hours), at home or even in my office if they need to.” Practice – Customized Digital Content (via Screencasting) Practice – Make Sure all Students Have Access to the Content! Flipped Classroom Best Practices from …
  • 21. “Now, when students come to class, they’ve already learned about the material and can spend class time working on math problems, writing about the Civil War or working on a science project, with the help of their teacher whenever they need it. This model allows students to seek one-on-one help from their teacher when they have a question …” Flipped Classroom Best Practices from … Practice – Personalized Learning
  • 22. “… we wanted to give our students the opportunity to learn about each subject or topic from … a recognized expert in each area. So we decided to team with other schools across the country and world. Now, some of our calculus students are able to watch video lectures from a math teacher in a private school in Virginia, and our students learning about the Holocaust can watch videos made by a teacher in Israel who just brought her class to Auschwitz. This … enable[d] us to close the gap of inequality that schools are subjected to because of their financial standing, and provide all students, no matter what district they’re from …” Flipped Classroom Best Practices from … Practice – Collaboration in Content Development
  • 23. Practices – Social Learning (even outside of the classroom!) “To change the learning environment even further, we’ve used Google Groups to enable students to easily communicate outside of class, participate in large discussions related to their schoolwork and learn from each other.” Flipped Classroom Best Practices from …
  • 24. Best Practices culled from … A Review of Flipped Learning SUMMARY of Best Practices from … • Customized Digital Content • Make Sure all Students Have Access to the Content! • Personalized Learning • Collaboration in Content Development • Social Learning
  • 25. 2013 Report from Hamdan, McKnight, P., McKnight K., Arfstrom with Peer Review Support from the FLN’s Research Community http://www.flippedlearning.org/cms/lib07/VA01923112/Centricity/ Domain/41/LitReview_FlippedLearning.pdf This often cited report examined many studies and articles discussing flipped teaching and learning and disseminated definitions and practices.
  • 26. Best Practices culled from … A Review of Flipped Learning “Educators have been working to break [the] lecture- centered instructional model by shifting the focus from the curriculum pacing guide to student learning needs as the driver of instruction. They are, increasingly, turning to an alternative model of instruction called Flipped Learning in which digital technologies are used to shift direct instruction outside of the group learning space to the individual learning space, usually via videos. Offloading direct instruction in this way allows teachers to reconsider how to maximize individual face-to-face time with students ...” Practice – Personalized Learning
  • 27. Best Practices culled from … A Review of Flipped Learning ”Time becomes available for students to collaborate with peers on projects, engage more deeply with content, practice skills, and receive feedback on their progress. Teachers can devote more time to coaching their students, helping them develop procedural fluency if needed, and inspiring and assisting them with challenging projects that give them greater control over their own learning.” Practices – Collaborative, Active, & Social Learning Practices – Coaching, Project Based Learning
  • 28. Best Practices culled from … A Review of Flipped Learning Pillar #1 – Flexible Environments “Flipped classrooms allow for a variety of learning modes; educators often physically rearrange their learning space to accommodate the lesson or unit, which might involve group work, independent study, research, performance, and evaluation. They create Flexible Environments in which students choose when and where they learn. Flipped educators accept that the in-class time will be somewhat chaotic and noisy, as compared with the quiet typical of a well-behaved class during a lecture ... “ Practice – Collaborative Learning Spaces
  • 29. Best Practices culled from … A Review of Flipped Learning Pillar #2 – A Shift in Learning Culture “In the Flipped Learning model, there is a deliberate shift from a teacher-centered classroom to a student- centered approach, where in-class time is meant for exploring topics in greater depth and creating richer learning opportunities. Students move from being the product of teaching to the center of learning, where they are actively involved in knowledge formation through opportunities to participate in and evaluate their learning in a manner that is personally meaningful.” Practices - Student-Centered Learning Practice - Constructivist Learning
  • 30. Best Practices culled from … A Review of Flipped Learning SUMMARY of Practices Gleaned from … • Personalized Learning • Collaborative Learning • Active Learning • Social Learning • Coaching • Project Based Learning • Collaborative Learning Spaces • Student-Centered Learning • Constructivist Learning
  • 31. Summarizing our Findings Best Practices for … • Flipped Content Creation & Delivery • Active Learning in the Flipped Classroom • Using Class Time Effectively in the Flipped Classroom
  • 32. Summarizing our Findings … Best Practices for Flipped Content Creation & Delivery • Customized Digital Learning Content • Collaborative Development of Content • Take Measures to Ensure Consumption of Content • Make Sure all Students Have Access to the Content
  • 33. • Collaborative Learning Spaces • Constructivist Learning • Project Based Learning • All other types of Active Learning Summarizing our Findings … Best Practices for Active Learning in the Flipped Classroom
  • 34. • Student-Centered Learning • Use Class Time to Review &Reinforce • Personalized/Individualized Learning • Collaboration • Social Learning • Coaching • Mastery Learning Summarizing our Findings … Best Practices for Using Class Time Effectively in the Flipped Classroom
  • 35. Best Practices for … Flipped Content Creation & Delivery • Customized Digital Learning Content • Collaborative Development of Content • Take Measures to Ensure Consumption of Content • Make Sure all Students Have Access to the Content Let’s Take a Deeper Dive into these Practices …
  • 36. Practice: Customized Digital Learning Content • Screencasting is quite common: Free tools like Screencast- O-Matic, Screenr, etc. Camtasia is “the Gold Standard” • It is also pretty easy to voice over PowerPoint slides. Learn more here for 2007, and here for 2010 • There are a growing number of tools that let you take any video and “make it your own” through customized, interactive delivery • Ed.ted.com • Tackk • There are also many tools that make it easy to assemble digital content into custom lessons, such as LessonPaths and Blendspace • Edpuzzle.com • Metta.io
  • 37. Practice: Collaborative Development of Content • Bergmann and Sams – Recommend working with a partner to create screencasts • Schools have collaborated with vendors to create content, as we have seen in some of these examples • Clintondale High School collaborated globally with educators and SMEs to create live learning opportunities for learning in class
  • 38. Practice: Measures to Ensure Consumption of Content • Interactive Engagement During Consumption – • Reflective Blog Posts • Complete a Notes Outline (could be credit/no credit) • Look for and provide answers to specific questions • Indicate what was most understood and what was least understood (excellent feedback for teacher!) • Hide ‘Easter Eggs’ • Partner students in some way ( ) • Set expectations for the next class session – • Start some classed with pop-quiz or scheduled quiz • Start class with in depth discussion • Be prepared to be called on at random
  • 39. Practice: Make Sure Students Have Access to the Content • You need to assess whether there are any students who might not have access to flipped content outside of the classroom (in some schools this more of an issue that others) • If you are flipping content for an elementary grade level course, you need to involve parents/guardians in the process (they need to know what is expected of the student) • If students don’t have easy access to content, work with them to make sure they know what resources in the school (or elsewhere, like a public library) are available to provide access • Limit how much content you flip for young students (for example, if a first or second grade course, limiting to just one flip a week is advisable)
  • 40. Practice: Social Learning Adding Social Learning Elements to the Flipped Classroom Outside of Class (as part of consuming flipped content): • Google Groups example (Clintondale High School) • Require students to respond to discussion posts (common online technique for years) • Partner students in finding answers to questions in content (extend to classroom by having them present answers) In Class: • Work in teams or groups on collaborative active learning activities
  • 41. Best Practices for … Active Learning in the Flipped Classroom • Project Based Learning • Constructivist Learning • Collaborative Learning Spaces Let’s Take a Deeper Dive into these Practices …
  • 42. Practice: Project Based Learning http://www.newtechnetwork.org/about/project-based-learning
  • 43. Practice: Constructivist Learning http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2cla ss/constructivism/ What is constructivism? Constructivism is basically a theory -- based on observation and scientific study -- about how people learn. It says that people construct their own understanding and knowledge of the world, through experiencing things and reflecting on those experiences. When we encounter something new, we have to reconcile it with our previous ideas and experience, maybe changing what we believe, or maybe discarding the new information as irrelevant. In any case, we are active creators of our own knowledge. To do this, we must ask questions, explore, and assess what we know
  • 44. Practice: Collaborative Learning Spaces • Educators often physically rearrange their learning space to accommodate the lesson or unit, which might involve group work, independent study, research, performance, and evaluation. • They create Flexible Environments in which students choose when and where they learn. • Flipped educators accept that the in-class time will be somewhat chaotic and noisy, as compared with the quiet typical of a well-behaved class during a lecture. http://www.emergingedtech.com/2013/07/the-growing- use-of-collaborative-classrooms-spaces-in-higher-education/
  • 45. Best Practices for … Using Class Time Effectively • Student-Centered Learning • Use Class Time to Review &Reinforce • Personalized/Individualized Learning • Collaborative Learning • Social Learning • Coaching • Mastery Learning Let’s Take a Deeper Dive into these Practices …
  • 46. Practice: Student-Centered Learning • “… there is a deliberate shift from a teacher-centered classroom to a student-centered approach, where in-class time is meant for exploring topics in greater depth and creating richer learning opportunities. • Students move from being the product of teaching to the center of learning, where they are actively involved in knowledge formation* through opportunities to participate in and evaluate their learning in a manner that is personally meaningful.” *Constructivist Learning
  • 47. Practice: Use Class Time to Review & Reinforce This has been a fundamental concept in the flipped classroom all along “We're flipped in that we assign homework and technology- based activities, so [students] have to do their online work before coming to class, and then in class we're able to focus more on activities, demonstrations and some lecture. But it's very much activity-based because they've actually done the work prior to coming to class and they're familiar with the content, said Hudson”. - Danae Hudson, Missouri State U.
  • 48. Practice: Personalized/Individualized Learning http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personalized_learning
  • 49. Practice: Collaborative Learning http://www.edutopia.org/stw-collaborative-learning
  • 50. Practice: Social Learning 7 Way That Social Networking Tools Can Yield Social Learning in the Classroom (http://www.emergingedtech.com/2011/06/7-reasons-to-leverage-social- networking-tools-in-the-classroom/) • Increase Engagement • Social Learning Theory (Bandura) “people learn from one another, via observation, imitation, and modeling” • Use time outside of class better, so you can use in-class time better • It provides opportunities for writing and writing assessment • Encourage dialogue, reach more students • Help students get ahead of the professional curve • Build connections Bonus – Improve Retention! http://www.emergingedtech.com/2012/10/can- social-media-play-a-role-in-improving-retention-in-higher-education-research-says-it- can/
  • 51. Practice: Coaching http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational- leadership/oct11/vol69/num02/Every-Teacher-a-Coach.aspx
  • 52. Practice: Mastery Learning http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational- leadership/oct10/vol68/num02/Lessons-of-Mastery-Learning.aspx
  • 53. THANK YOU! Please Visit … emergingedtech.com &