What you missed when you skipped design school - Theory and Criticism
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What you missed when you skipped design school - Theory and Criticism

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The afternoon session of the What You Missed When you Skipped Design School workshop at Interaction'12, Dublin. ...

The afternoon session of the What You Missed When you Skipped Design School workshop at Interaction'12, Dublin.

The first part of the workshop, by Dave Malouf, is here http://www.slideshare.net/dmalouf/what-you-missed-when-you-skipped-design-school

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  • Alfred Barr, the Director of the Museum of Modern Art 1938 preface to the book Bauhaus (edited by Gropius and Bayer):\n\nmost student should face the fact that their future should be involved primarily with industry and mass production rather than with individual craftsmanship\nteachers in schools of design should be men who are in advance of their profession rather than safely and academically in the rearguard\nthe schools of design should, as the Bauhaus did, bring together the various arts of painting, architechture, theatre, photography, weaving, typography, etc., into a modern synthesis which disregards conventional distinctions between the "fine" and "applied" arts\nit is harder to design a first rate chair than to paint a second rate painting-and much more useful\na school of design should have on its faculty the purely creative and disinterested artist such as the easel painter as a spiritual counterpoint to the practical technician in order that they may work and teach side by side for the benefit of the student\nmanual experience of materials is essential to the student of design- esperience at first confined to free experiment and then extended to the practical workshop\nthe study of rational design in terms of techniques and materials should be only the first step in the development of a new and modern sense of beauty\nbecause we live in the 20th century, the student architect or designer should be offered no refuge in the past but should be equipped for the modern world in its various aspects, artistic, technical, social, economic, spiritual, so that he may function in society not as a decorator but as a vital participant.\n\nVisual language\n\n\n
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  • George Nelson – architect, author, designer, teacher\nVitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein\n\nDesign Philosophy: \nGeorge Nelson was of the opinion that a designer who deals creatively with peoples’ needs “must first make a radical and conscious break with all the values he considers inhuman.” Nelson’s credo was that designers must be conscious of the effects their work has on humans and society. Not least of all for this reason he considered total design “nothing more or less than a process of relating everything to everything.” Nelson was a pioneer of modern design precisely by dint of this ability to see things in relationship to each other, coupled with his multifarious activities made. Yet Nelson was not just a successful designer but also a much admired author and publicist. And as design director for furniture manufacturers Herman Miller, he influenced its program and image for more than two decades from 1946 on. He brought Charles and Ray Eames, Isamu Noguchi and Alexander Girard to Herman Miller. In his first half year at Herman Miller, Nelson introduced his Platform Bench, a bench for accommodating both people and objects. With its clear lines and the potential to use it in a variety of ways it still stands today for the durability and flexibility of modern design. His innovative new ideas included the design of a wall unit system that pioneered the way for systems furniture and which caused a real sensation in the furniture industry of the day.\n\n
  • Alfred Barr, the Director of the Museum of Modern Art 1938 preface to the book Bauhaus (edited by Gropius and Bayer):\n\nmost student should face the fact that their future should be involved primarily with industry and mass production rather than with individual craftsmanship\nteachers in schools of design should be men who are in advance of their profession rather than safely and academically in the rearguard\nthe schools of design should, as the Bauhaus did, bring together the various arts of painting, architechture, theatre, photography, weaving, typography, etc., into a modern synthesis which disregards conventional distinctions between the "fine" and "applied" arts\nit is harder to design a first rate chair than to paint a second rate painting-and much more useful\na school of design should have on its faculty the purely creative and disinterested artist such as the easel painter as a spiritual counterpoint to the practical technician in order that they may work and teach side by side for the benefit of the student\nmanual experience of materials is essential to the student of design- esperience at first confined to free experiment and then extended to the practical workshop\nthe study of rational design in terms of techniques and materials should be only the first step in the development of a new and modern sense of beauty\nbecause we live in the 20th century, the student architect or designer should be offered no refuge in the past but should be equipped for the modern world in its various aspects, artistic, technical, social, economic, spiritual, so that he may function in society not as a decorator but as a vital participant.\n\nVisual language\n\n\n
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  • Alfred Barr, the Director of the Museum of Modern Art 1938 preface to the book Bauhaus (edited by Gropius and Bayer):\n\nmost student should face the fact that their future should be involved primarily with industry and mass production rather than with individual craftsmanship\nteachers in schools of design should be men who are in advance of their profession rather than safely and academically in the rearguard\nthe schools of design should, as the Bauhaus did, bring together the various arts of painting, architechture, theatre, photography, weaving, typography, etc., into a modern synthesis which disregards conventional distinctions between the "fine" and "applied" arts\nit is harder to design a first rate chair than to paint a second rate painting-and much more useful\na school of design should have on its faculty the purely creative and disinterested artist such as the easel painter as a spiritual counterpoint to the practical technician in order that they may work and teach side by side for the benefit of the student\nmanual experience of materials is essential to the student of design- esperience at first confined to free experiment and then extended to the practical workshop\nthe study of rational design in terms of techniques and materials should be only the first step in the development of a new and modern sense of beauty\nbecause we live in the 20th century, the student architect or designer should be offered no refuge in the past but should be equipped for the modern world in its various aspects, artistic, technical, social, economic, spiritual, so that he may function in society not as a decorator but as a vital participant.\n\n\n\n
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What you missed when you skipped design school - Theory and Criticism What you missed when you skipped design school - Theory and Criticism Presentation Transcript

  • Theory & Criticism http://www.flickr.com/photos/bitboy/2042821350
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/89767536@N00/405946678/
  • Design PrinciplesGood Design:• Is innovative• Makes a product useful• Is aesthetic• Makes a product understandable• Is unobtrusive• Is honest• Is long-lasting• Is thorough down to the last detail• Is environmentally friendly• Is as little design as possible
  • Design Philosophy
  • Shared LanguageFoundationLinePlaneVolumeValueTextureColour
  • Shared Language Time Abstraction Metaphor Movement
  • Critique TipsWhat are we trying to do with the design?(Intent)How successful is the solution?(Product) http://www.flickr.com/photos/trufflepig/1589880333
  • Critique TipsFocus on the work, not the personExplain whyAsk lots of questionsListenConstructive, not instructiveUnderstand and account for contextUse shared language http://www.flickr.com/photos/trufflepig/1589880333
  • Critique TipsEarly and oftenA safe environmentOngoing and integratedin the studio