E-Mediat: Day 1 Orientation and Networks
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  • IIE and publicly acknowledge funding by the U.S. Department of State Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI).
  • Photo by Beth KanterPhotos from Women in Technology Web Site
  • Photo by Beth Kanter
  • Photo by Beth Kanter
  • ImageSource: Wikipedia/Map of Six Degrees Theory of Social Connectivityhttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Six_degrees_of_separation.pngText: Chapter 2: Understanding Networks – The Networked Nonprofit by Beth Kanter and Allison FineSocial networks are collections of people and organizations who are connected to each other in different ways through common interests or affiliations. Social networks have different patterns and structures to them and the glue that holds networks together and makes them effective is relationships If NGOs as well as social media trainers understand the basic building blocks of social networks and apply to our work – whether training or a social media campaign - we will get more impactful results.
  •  Five Things About Me: When the E-Mediat partners met in January for the first time, this is the icebreaker we used. (http://www.bethkanter.org/emediat-nerd/). It allows each individual to introduce themselves and share something about their experience, expertise, or knowledge related to the project. We will have created a social network on the wall that allows us to visualize our shared points of connection and reciprocity. The trainers will document the exercise to post to our blog journals. Preparation Step: Tape poster sheets to the wall and label with “Five Things About Me Network”Hand out the sticky notes to participants. Give a different color sticky note to each in-country team. Ask each person to write down one word or phrase on a sticky note that describes their knowledge, skill, expertise, or something important that they’d like to group to know about them. Participants should share five sticky notes per person. Participants should include their name and Twitter ID (if they have one) on the sticky note. Have each participant stand in front of the group and introduce share their “Five Things About Me” and put the sticky notes on the poster sheet. Debrief: As a group, reflect on these questions and summarize connections/reciprocity poster paper:What points of connection (common interests) did you hear or see?What opportunities for reciprocity? We have a created a social network and found connections based on our mutual interests. This is one of the key benefits of social media, especially for trainers. For example, on Twitter if we start using the #Emediathashtag (a keyword or topic), we start to find and identify other people who may be interested in this project and might answer a question or point us to a resource.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/aleksiaaltonen/3276833785/
  • ImageSource: Wikipedia/Map of Six Degrees Theory of Social Connectivityhttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Six_degrees_of_separation.pngText: Chapter 2: Understanding Networks – The Networked Nonprofit by Beth Kanter and Allison Fine
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/nep/2284817865/Human Spectragram: This is a group face to face exercise to help surface similarities and differences in a group, help people to get to know each other and to do something together that is active.In a large open space put a long piece of tape on the floor. It should be long enough for the full group present to spread itself out over. Alternately, use a long piece of rope or ribbon.Ask everyone to stand up and gather around the tape. Explain that the tape is a continuum between two answers to questions they will be asked. Then kick off with a simple, fun question to demonstrate the method. Walk up and down the tape and take a sampling response from people as to why they positioned themselves on the tape the way they did. Usually it is good to sample from both ends and somewhere in the middle. If, upon hearing other people's responses, people want to move, encourage them to do so. This is about meaning making, not about an absolute measure of peoples' opinions.Then move on to "serious" questions. As you ask questions, encourage people to notice who is where on the line - this helps people find people in common or who have different views that could be useful discussion starters.Depending on time, use between 3- 7 questions. You can tell it is time to quit when people stop moving and are talking to each other more than participating. This means either they are bored, or they have become deeply engaged with each other. And the latter is a good thing!QuestionsHow many time zones did you travel to get to Beirut? (None/more than 10)How comfortable are you personally using social media? (very/not at all)How much experience do you have training or coaching NGOs or civil society organizations that have a campaign or cause? (a lot/not at all) (Raise hands if the campaign used social media)How much experience do you have delivering social media trainings? (no experience/a lot of experience)How much experience do you have creating training materials? (no experience (only use as is)/a lot (create my own from scratch)The Networked Nonprofit concept is relevant to NGOs in my country (agree/disagree)Digital activism campaigns need both strategy and tactics (agree/disagree)Human Spectragramhttp://www.kstoolkit.org/Human+Spectrogram
  • Module 1: Profile of a Networked NGO / What Do You Know about Social Media? Tools & Concepts / Search, Listen & Engage / Facebook & Twitter (3 days)Module 2:Module 2: Presences and Campaigns / Strategy2 daysModule 3: Content Strategy & Production / Telling Stories (2 days)Module 4: Building Your Network / Promoting Your Work / Mobiles (2 days)Module 5: Analyze / Revise (2 days)
  • Coaching is intended to help NGOs take the ideas, concepts, and skills they are introduced to at the workshops and put them into practice over six months in the context of a social media strategy or campaign plan. Coaching will happen face-to-face (the day after workshops?), through the online community site, and cell phone. Coaching will respond to the specific needs and context of the NGOs with just in time support, inspiration, connection to resources and people.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/littlelakes/54251489/
  • ImageSource: Wikipedia/Map of Six Degrees Theory of Social Connectivityhttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Six_degrees_of_separation.pngText: Chapter 2: Understanding Networks – The Networked Nonprofit by Beth Kanter and Allison FineTime: 1:00-2:15 (75 minutes: 15 minutes presentation/30 minutes exercise/30 minutes teams present) Lead: Beth KanterGoal: Now that we have created a social network based on interests between in-country teams, we can build on this and create a network of our professional networks. This session will introduce the basic vocabulary of networks and how to visualize a network using low-tech tools and use it to achieve project goals. The networking exercise is also of value to nonprofits who are becoming networked nonprofits (Day 2) or plan and implement a networked campaign (Day 3).
  • Image from Working WikilyTime: 1:00-2:15 (75 minutes: 15 minutes presentation/30 minutes exercise/30 minutes teams present) Lead: Beth KanterGoal: Now that we have created a social network based on interests between in-country teams, we can build on this and create a network of our professional networks. This session will introduce the basic vocabulary of networks and how to visualize a network using low-tech tools and use it to achieve project goals. The networking exercise is also of value to nonprofits who are becoming networked nonprofits (Day 2) or plan and implement a networked campaign (Day 3).
  • Mapping NetworksSocial network mapping tools help you visual your network. Use to draw your network because it helps you see the connections and identify strategy. There is a range from simple to complex, free to expensive, and low-tech to high-tech. Example: Draw Network: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cambodia4kidsorg/4002466674/Example: National Wildlife Federation: Low Tech and High Tech - Twitter Network MapHow Networked Nonprofits Visualize Their Networkshttp://www.bethkanter.org/network-mapping/http://twitpic.com/3p4b4yhttp://www.flickr.com/search/?s=rec&w=58428285%40N00&q=twitter+map&m=text
  • Mapping NetworksSocial network mapping tools help you visual your network. Use to draw your network because it helps you see the connections and identify strategy. There is a range from simple to complex, free to expensive, and low-tech to high-tech. Example: Draw Network: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cambodia4kidsorg/4002466674/Example: National Wildlife Federation: Low Tech and High Tech - Twitter Network MapHow Networked Nonprofits Visualize Their Networkshttp://www.bethkanter.org/network-mapping/http://twitpic.com/3p4b4yhttp://www.flickr.com/search/?s=rec&w=58428285%40N00&q=twitter+map&m=text
  • http://www.dailyseoblog.com/2009/06/9-tools-to-measure-your-twitter-influence-reach/
  • Social capital that make relationships meaningful and resilient. Trust and reciprocity. Social media can help build social capital because:Social networks make it easy to find people online Serendipity is enhanced by social networking sites where people connect based on their interests or friendsReciprocity is easy
  • Here is an example.
  • Mapping Your Network ExerciseGoal: This exercise will provide an opportunity for each individual to use a low-tech method (sticky notes and poster paper) to map their professional network. (If they use LinkedIn, they can experiment with the social networking mapping tool during the hands-on session next.) This exercise will connects to Day 4: Trainer’s Practicum. Individuals on the teams don’t all need to become experts on social media, networks, or NGOs. They can use an understanding of networks to develop and weave relationships with others to help them learn how to use social media and make connections for the NGOs they working with. Description: Teams will work together. They will use sticky notes to create their own professional network. We will debrief standing up as group and looking at each team’s map. One person from each team should be prepared to explain the map to the whole group and share insights. Steps:1. Tape post sheets on the wall to use and label them with the of the country.2. Each person on the team is part of the “core” and will be working together in a “networked way” to provide capacity building, coaching, and training to NGOS in their country. 3. Have each person add the “go to” people, organizations, online communities, bloggers, Twitter user, or other resources that can help reach this objective. They can use sticky notes – and identify different colors for topic areas if desired or distinguish between people, NGOs, businesses, Arab techies, and online sites. If appropriate, they should add the training partners to the map.4. Have each person identify influencers that they may or not know to help them reach their objective.5. Identify and discuss specific ties between the core and the nodes – identify overlaps.6. Using the reflection questions below, look for different patterns or clusters – do you know the same or different people? Who do you need to build relationships with? Who can you introduce in your network? Some reflection questions to generate insights. You’ll need to revise this so they specifically support your objective.What people, resources, and organizations are in your ecosystem?What are the different roles?Are you connected or not connected?If connected, how are you connected?Think about the touch points in your network? How do you appreciate, thank, and celebrate important people in your network?Think about reciprocity: What have you given people in your network before they have asked?Debrief: Gather everyone together as a full group standing. Walk as a group to the first map, and ask How does this idea translate? How can you use your professional network to support your work on this project?
  • Mapping Your Network ExerciseGoal: This exercise will provide an opportunity for each individual to use a low-tech method (sticky notes and poster paper) to map their professional network. (If they use LinkedIn, they can experiment with the social networking mapping tool during the hands-on session next.) This exercise will connects to Day 4: Trainer’s Practicum. Individuals on the teams don’t all need to become experts on social media, networks, or NGOs. They can use an understanding of networks to develop and weave relationships with others to help them learn how to use social media and make connections for the NGOs they working with. Description: Teams will work together. They will use sticky notes to create their own professional network. We will debrief standing up as group and looking at each team’s map. One person from each team should be prepared to explain the map to the whole group and share insights. Steps:1. Tape post sheets on the wall to use and label them with the of the country.2. Each person on the team is part of the “core” and will be working together in a “networked way” to provide capacity building, coaching, and training to NGOS in their country. 3. Have each person add the “go to” people, organizations, online communities, bloggers, Twitter user, or other resources that can help reach this objective. They can use sticky notes – and identify different colors for topic areas if desired or distinguish between people, NGOs, businesses, Arab techies, and online sites. If appropriate, they should add the training partners to the map.4. Have each person identify influencers that they may or not know to help them reach their objective.5. Identify and discuss specific ties between the core and the nodes – identify overlaps.6. Using the reflection questions below, look for different patterns or clusters – do you know the same or different people? Who do you need to build relationships with? Who can you introduce in your network? Some reflection questions to generate insights. You’ll need to revise this so they specifically support your objective.What people, resources, and organizations are in your ecosystem?What are the different roles?Are you connected or not connected?If connected, how are you connected?Think about the touch points in your network? How do you appreciate, thank, and celebrate important people in your network?Think about reciprocity: What have you given people in your network before they have asked?Debrief: Gather everyone together as a full group standing. Walk as a group to the first map, and ask How does this idea translate? How can you use your professional network to support your work on this project?
  • Mapping Your Network ExerciseGoal: This exercise will provide an opportunity for each individual to use a low-tech method (sticky notes and poster paper) to map their professional network. (If they use LinkedIn, they can experiment with the social networking mapping tool during the hands-on session next.) This exercise will connects to Day 4: Trainer’s Practicum. Individuals on the teams don’t all need to become experts on social media, networks, or NGOs. They can use an understanding of networks to develop and weave relationships with others to help them learn how to use social media and make connections for the NGOs they working with. Description: Teams will work together. They will use sticky notes to create their own professional network. We will debrief standing up as group and looking at each team’s map. One person from each team should be prepared to explain the map to the whole group and share insights. Steps:1. Tape post sheets on the wall to use and label them with the of the country.2. Each person on the team is part of the “core” and will be working together in a “networked way” to provide capacity building, coaching, and training to NGOS in their country. 3. Have each person add the “go to” people, organizations, online communities, bloggers, Twitter user, or other resources that can help reach this objective. They can use sticky notes – and identify different colors for topic areas if desired or distinguish between people, NGOs, businesses, Arab techies, and online sites. If appropriate, they should add the training partners to the map.4. Have each person identify influencers that they may or not know to help them reach their objective.5. Identify and discuss specific ties between the core and the nodes – identify overlaps.6. Using the reflection questions below, look for different patterns or clusters – do you know the same or different people? Who do you need to build relationships with? Who can you introduce in your network? Some reflection questions to generate insights. You’ll need to revise this so they specifically support your objective.What people, resources, and organizations are in your ecosystem?What are the different roles?Are you connected or not connected?If connected, how are you connected?Think about the touch points in your network? How do you appreciate, thank, and celebrate important people in your network?Think about reciprocity: What have you given people in your network before they have asked?Debrief: Gather everyone together as a full group standing. Walk as a group to the first map, and ask How does this idea translate? How can you use your professional network to support your work on this project?
  • Mapping Your Network ExerciseGoal: This exercise will provide an opportunity for each individual to use a low-tech method (sticky notes and poster paper) to map their professional network. (If they use LinkedIn, they can experiment with the social networking mapping tool during the hands-on session next.) This exercise will connects to Day 4: Trainer’s Practicum. Individuals on the teams don’t all need to become experts on social media, networks, or NGOs. They can use an understanding of networks to develop and weave relationships with others to help them learn how to use social media and make connections for the NGOs they working with. Description: Teams will work together. They will use sticky notes to create their own professional network. We will debrief standing up as group and looking at each team’s map. One person from each team should be prepared to explain the map to the whole group and share insights. Steps:1. Tape post sheets on the wall to use and label them with the of the country.2. Each person on the team is part of the “core” and will be working together in a “networked way” to provide capacity building, coaching, and training to NGOS in their country. 3. Have each person add the “go to” people, organizations, online communities, bloggers, Twitter user, or other resources that can help reach this objective. They can use sticky notes – and identify different colors for topic areas if desired or distinguish between people, NGOs, businesses, Arab techies, and online sites. If appropriate, they should add the training partners to the map.4. Have each person identify influencers that they may or not know to help them reach their objective.5. Identify and discuss specific ties between the core and the nodes – identify overlaps.6. Using the reflection questions below, look for different patterns or clusters – do you know the same or different people? Who do you need to build relationships with? Who can you introduce in your network? Some reflection questions to generate insights. You’ll need to revise this so they specifically support your objective.What people, resources, and organizations are in your ecosystem?What are the different roles?Are you connected or not connected?If connected, how are you connected?Think about the touch points in your network? How do you appreciate, thank, and celebrate important people in your network?Think about reciprocity: What have you given people in your network before they have asked?Debrief: Gather everyone together as a full group standing. Walk as a group to the first map, and ask How does this idea translate? How can you use your professional network to support your work on this project?
  • Photo by Beth Kanter
  • Photo by Beth Kanter
  • Photo by Beth Kanter

Transcript

  • 1. Train the TrainersDay 1: Orientation and Networks
    Networks for Social Media Trainers
    Beth Kanter, Co-Author, The Networked Nonprofit
    This project is managed by Institute for International Institute for Education (IIE)Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI)
  • 2. Learning Objectives
    • For in-country teams and partners to get to know one another and their networks and the project as a whole
    • 3. To understand networks and their benefit for social media trainers and NGOs
    • 4. To model and practice integrating use of social media tools to deliver, document, and share instruction with networks
  • Agenda
    9:00-10:30 Welcome and Introduction From Me to We Exercise
    Beth Kanter
    10:30-10:45 Break
    10:45-11:30 Project Overview Heather Ramsey, IIE
    11:30-Noon Train the Trainers and Coaching Overview Jessica, Mohamad, Mary, and Beth
    Lunch
    1-2:15 Working As A Network for Social Media Trainers Network Mapping Exercise
    2:15-3:30 Laptop Time: Blog Post About Your Network Map3:30-4:00 Reflection and Closing
  • 5. Theme for Day 1: From Me to We
    The big idea in the book “The Networked Nonprofit” is that NGOs need to work less like single institutions and more like networks to be more effective using social media. The same is true for social media trainers. Using professional networks can help us be more efficient because we don’t need to know everything. Social media tools can help us easily connect with new people who have knowledge, resources, and ideas to share to help with our goals.
  • 6. Training Techniques
    Presentation
    Activity
    Discussion
  • 7. Laptop Time
  • 8. Model Use of Social Media Document, Deliver, and Share Instruction
    What are our rules for sharing on social networks during the session?
    What other ways have you integrated social media into your training work?
    #emediat
  • 9. Definition: Social Networks
    Social networks are collections of people and organizations who are connected to each other in different ways through common interests or affiliations.
  • 10. Five Things About Me: Creating A Social Network Based on Our Individual Knowledge
    Activity
  • 11. Instructions
    Share five things about you that are important for others to know for this project
    Write one word per sticky note
    Include your name and Twitter ID
    Each country should be represented by one color of sticky notes
  • 12. Each person should introduce themselves to the group and place their sticky notes on the wall
  • 13. Reflection
    • What points of connection or common interests did you hear or see?
    • 14. What opportunities for reciprocity?
    Discussion
  • 15. The Power of Social Networks
    We have now created a social network around our shared interests. This is what happens when we use #hashtagson Twitter or other tools. Social networks have different patterns and structures. The glue that holds them together is relationships: connections and reciprocity. If social media trainers or NGOs understand the basic building blocks of social networks and apply to their work, whether training or a campaign that uses social media tools – we will get better results.
  • 16. None
    10 or more
    How many time zones did you travel to get here?
    How many time zones did you travel to get to Beirut? (None/more than 10)How comfortable are you personally using social media? (very/not at all)How much experience do you have training or coaching NGOs or civil society organizations that have a campaign or cause? (a lot/not at all) (Raise hands if the campaign used social media)How much experience do you have delivering social media trainings? (no experience/a lot of experience)How much experience do you have creating training materials? (no experience (only use as is)/a lot (create my own from scratch)The Networked Nonprofit concept is relevant to NGOs in my country (agree/disagree)Digital activism campaigns need both strategy and tactics (agree/disagree)
    Activity
    Human Spectragram
  • 17. E-Mediat: Project Overview
    Heather Ramsey, IIE
  • 18. E-Mediat: Train the Trainers and Coaching Overview
  • 19. The Train the Trainers: Quick Overview
    Trainer Practicum
    Networks
    Digital Activism
    Social Media Tools/Skills
    Workshop Delivery
    CoachingOnline Site
  • 20. E-Mediat: Social Media Practice Model
  • 21. Workshop and Coaching Delivery
    Module 13 days
    Module 5
    Module 2
    Module 3
    Module 4
    Coaching
    Coaching
    Coaching
    Coaching
    Analyze and Revise
    Networked NGOTools and Concepts
    Facebook and Twitter
    Building Your Network
    Promoting Your Work
    Mobiles
    Presences andCampaigns
    Content Strategyand ProductionStorytelling
    Online SiteIn-Country TeamsOthers
  • 22. E-Mediat: Social Media Maturity of Practice Model
    Coaching NGOS
  • 23. Social Media NGO Coaching Tactics
  • 24. Lunch
    Flickr photo by Littlelakes
  • 25. Network Primer for Social Media Trainers
    Basic Definitions
    Network Terms
    Tools for Mapping and Examples: Low Tech and High Tech
    Techniques to Strengthen Networks: Network Weaving
    Presentation
  • 26. Network Primer for Social Media Trainers
    What: Social networks are collections of people and organizations who are connected to each other in different ways through common interests or affiliations. A network map visualize these connections.
    Why: If we understand the basic building blocks of social networks, and visually map them, we can leverage them for our work and NGOs can leverage them for their campaigns. We bring in new people and resources and save time.
  • 27. Periphery
    Cluster
    Ties
    Node
    Basic Building Blocks of Networks
    Core
    Hubs or Influencers
    Source: Working Wikily
  • 28. Tools for Mapping Your Network
    There is a range -- from simple to complex, free to expensive, and low-tech to high-tech.
    Best to begin with low tech methods.
  • 29. How NGOs Visualize Their Networks: Activism Strategy
    National Wildlife Federation
    Brought together team that is working on advocacy strategy to support a law that encourages children to play outside.
    Team mapped their 5 “go to people” about this issue
    Look at connections and strategic value of relationships, gaps
  • 30. How NGOs Visualize Their Networks: Ecosystem
  • 31. Visual Your Professional Online Network:
  • 32. NGOs Use Network MappingTo Strengthen Strategy: Find Hubs
  • 33.
  • 34.
  • 35. Strengthening Your NetworkSocial Capital and Network Weaving
    Social Capital: The benefit from building relationships with people in your network through trust and reciprocity
    Network Weaving: A set of skills that help build your network by introducing people together, facilitating conversations, being a bridge, and sharing resources, information, and contacts
    Social media makes it easy to strengthen networks because it is easy to find or connect with people online.
  • 36. Network Weaving TechniquesExample
  • 37. Working As A Network of Social Media Trainers: Map It First!
    Goal: This exercise will provide an opportunity for each team to map their network to visualize, develop, and weave relationships with others to help them learn how to use social media and make connections for the NGOs they working with.
    Description: Teams will work together. They will use sticky notes to create their own professional network. We will debrief standing up as group and looking at each team’s map. One person from each team should be prepared to explain the map to the whole group and share insights.
    Activity
  • 38. Working As A Network of Social Media Trainers: Map It First!
    Goal: This exercise will provide an opportunity for each team to map their network to visualize, develop, and weave relationships with others to help them learn how to use social media and make connections for the NGOs they working with.
    Description: Teams will work together. They will use sticky notes to create their own professional network. We will debrief standing up as group and looking at each team’s map. One person from each team should be prepared to explain the map to the whole group and share insights.
    Activity
  • 39. Working As A Network of Social Media Trainers: Steps
    Work together with the members of your In-Country Team
    Brainstorm a list of “go to” people, organizations, online communities, bloggers, Twitter users, or other resources for getting social media advise/answers.
    Decide on different colors to distinguish between different groups, write the names on the sticky notes
    Put them on the poster paper on the wall and as a group identify influencers, discuss specific ties and connections. Draw the connections.
    Use the reflection questions in the handout to generate more insights
    Activity
  • 40. Working As A Network of Social Media Trainers: Debrief
    Everyone should stand and walk as a group to the first map. Team members should answer:
    • What did you learn from this exercise?
    • 41. How can you use your networks to support your work on this project?
    Once everyone has debriefed their map, full group discussion:
    • What were some common connections or patterns between countries and teams?
    Activity
  • 42. Laptop Time
  • 43. Laptop Time: Instructions
    If you haven’t set up your blog, this is the time to do it.
    Write a blog post about the Network Map exercise. What did you learn?
    Take a photo of your map(s) and add it to the blog post.
    If you are on LinkedIn and want to experiment: http://blog.linkedin.com/2011/01/24/linkedin-inmaps/
    Read each other posts and leave comments
  • 44. Debrief
    What extra insight did you gain from blogging about the network exercise?
    What was it like to incorporate social media tools in the workshop?
    How might you adapt this exercise into your training for NGOs? What might be some of the challenges? Benefits?
    Discussion
  • 45. Reflecting and Closing
    What is clear?
    What questions do you still have?
    What is one thing you can put into practice that you learned today?
    Discussion
  • 46. Reflecting and Closing: Gratitude Circle
    Each person will give a bead and acknowledge one person in the room for teaching them something today.
    After you receive your gift, say thank you. Then it is your turn to thank someone in the room.
    Facilitator will go first
    Activity
    Activity
  • 47. Shokran!
  • 48. Rules for Using This Content
    Creative Commons Attribution License
    You are free to use this work as long you attribute the author Beth Kanter and include a link to Wiki:
    http://emediat.wikispaces.com