Executive Media January 20, 2011 Media Relations  & Crisis Management
Introduction  <ul><li>Goals for today: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding media and how it works </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><...
Executive Media <ul><li>David Dawson </li></ul><ul><li>Full-service agency in downtown Indianapolis </li></ul><ul><li>We m...
Meet the media  <ul><li>Why do we care? </li></ul><ul><li>Why do they only use bad news? </li></ul><ul><li>Reporters: </li...
Reporters <ul><li>Print: Everything on the record </li></ul><ul><li>Broadcast: If they record it, it’s on the record </li>...
Delivering your message <ul><li>What you control: </li></ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul><ul><li>Place </li></ul><ul><li>Spokesp...
There’s a reporter at the door <ul><li>Give yourself time to think </li></ul><ul><li>Pick a message and stick to it </li><...
Telling your story <ul><li>Importance </li></ul><ul><li>Relevance </li></ul><ul><li>Proximity </li></ul><ul><li>Human inte...
The setting <ul><li>Choose a background to emphasize your message </li></ul><ul><li>Control access </li></ul><ul><li>Contr...
Answering questions <ul><li>Return to message points </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t repeat damning questions </li></ul><ul><li>Do...
What is a crisis?  <ul><li>The signs of crisis: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Demands immediate action </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...
The crisis communication plan <ul><li>Assign crisis responsibilities in advance </li></ul><ul><li>Designate and train a sp...
When a crisis hits <ul><li>Activate your plan </li></ul><ul><li>Field media requests </li></ul><ul><li>Get all the facts <...
Basic public communication <ul><li>Get your story out quickly </li></ul><ul><li>Tell the truth </li></ul><ul><li>Be consis...
The message <ul><li>Plain language </li></ul><ul><li>Facts only </li></ul><ul><li>Stress key points </li></ul>
After it’s over <ul><li>Review operation of plan </li></ul><ul><li>Review success of messages </li></ul><ul><li>Update pla...
Video exercises <ul><li>Review scenarios </li></ul><ul><li>Frame message points </li></ul><ul><li>Draft message </li></ul>...
Wrap up <ul><li>Media’s job is not to make you look good. </li></ul><ul><li>Crisis communication </li></ul><ul><li>Intervi...
Conclusion <ul><li>Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Thanks for your attention </li></ul>
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Media and crisis

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Presentation on media relations and crisis communication, January 2011

By David Dawson
Executive Media
Indianapolis, IN

Published in: News & Politics
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  • Every organization needs support from its publics. Members, potential members, general public. Every other interest has access to media News: kitten Play schwantes tape Who are reporters: tear things down mom Change 1960 election 75 percent of all mentions of Kennedy and Nixon were positive in Time and newsweek; 1992 60 percent of mentions of Bush and Clinton in Time and newsweek were negative. Reporters Story tellers; ivory tower dwellers; Friends: betrayers - Nora Eppron wrote that it is the job of a writer to someday betray his friends. Ethics: what is his job?
  • Reporter shows up or calls/ treat well but keep your rights Facts - outside as well as inside Consult - two heads are better than one - Kubota Pick a message - consistent understandable
  • Effective public relations is a process. That process starts with research. You can’t persuade if you don’t know what you’re talking about and who you’re talking to. In particular, before you set out to change minds, you need to know where those minds are today. In one famous example, the American Dairy Association started planning a national campaign to tell Americans that milk was not a major contributor to cholesterol in the diet before its research discovered that Americans actually didn’t associate milk with high cholesterol. Research also can demonstrate the need for investment in a campaign. White River State Park and IMAX. Where is White River State Park? Discussion of informal and formal research methods could take all our time. For our purposes, we simply need to know that research gives us the first opportunity to listen to our audiences and a context for decisions that we need to make in building a message. The second step is planning. Starting with the objective of the process - say, building a new stadium – it’s important to gauge the scope of the campaign needed, the key audiences, the proper channels to use, sources and level of information needed, what events will be required, what timeline is needed and what time is available. Finally, you need to identify a budget and a way to evaluate the success of the program. We’ll concentrate today on the third aspect of the process - communication. Using the research and the planning decisions, the communications part of the process is where the strategies and tactics are executed. It’s where language and symbolism are crucial and where collecting feedback gives us guidance on altering our plans. In the Evan Bayh administration, avoiding general tax increases during the recession of the early 90s was an overriding goal. At one stage, strategists believed that applying taxes paid by for-profit businesses to hospitals could be viewed as something other than a tax increase because of public anger at the high cost of health care and the high salaries of hospital personnel. We discovered quickly, however, that the residual public image of hometown general hospitals was too strong to be altered within one budget cycle. Finally, evaluation measures the results against the objectives set during the planning process. It really is closing the cycle that began with research by generating another set of results. It’s important not only in the general desire to do better, but in recommending additional steps, providing a track record of tactics and measuring cost effectiveness.
  • It’s not over - Jimmy Carter - I have lusted after women in my heart &amp;quot;Just when you think there&apos;s nothing to write about, Nixon says, &amp;quot;I am not a crook.&amp;quot; Jimmy Carter says, &amp;quot;I have lusted after women in my heart.&amp;quot; President Reagan says, &amp;quot;I have just taken a urinalysis test, and I am not on dope.&amp;quot;&amp;quot; Success - your job Correct errors - permanent Where were your burned?
  • Media and crisis

    1. 1. Executive Media January 20, 2011 Media Relations & Crisis Management
    2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>Goals for today: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding media and how it works </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Techniques for handling media contacts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Basics of crisis communication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On-camera experience in media relations </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Executive Media <ul><li>David Dawson </li></ul><ul><li>Full-service agency in downtown Indianapolis </li></ul><ul><li>We make your message sound loud and clear </li></ul><ul><li>www.executivemedia.com </li></ul>
    4. 4. Meet the media <ul><li>Why do we care? </li></ul><ul><li>Why do they only use bad news? </li></ul><ul><li>Reporters: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Are people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Are not your friend </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Reporters <ul><li>Print: Everything on the record </li></ul><ul><li>Broadcast: If they record it, it’s on the record </li></ul><ul><li>Internet: Anyone, anywhere, anytime </li></ul>
    6. 6. Delivering your message <ul><li>What you control: </li></ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul><ul><li>Place </li></ul><ul><li>Spokesperson </li></ul><ul><li>Web site </li></ul><ul><li>What you can’t control </li></ul><ul><li>Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Judgment </li></ul><ul><li>Opponents </li></ul>
    7. 7. There’s a reporter at the door <ul><li>Give yourself time to think </li></ul><ul><li>Pick a message and stick to it </li></ul><ul><li>Say only what you know </li></ul><ul><li>Keep out of traps </li></ul>
    8. 8. Telling your story <ul><li>Importance </li></ul><ul><li>Relevance </li></ul><ul><li>Proximity </li></ul><ul><li>Human interest </li></ul>
    9. 9. The setting <ul><li>Choose a background to emphasize your message </li></ul><ul><li>Control access </li></ul><ul><li>Control sound </li></ul>
    10. 10. Answering questions <ul><li>Return to message points </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t repeat damning questions </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t speculate </li></ul><ul><li>Speak in short, active sentences </li></ul>
    11. 11. What is a crisis? <ul><li>The signs of crisis: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Demands immediate action </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Threatens operations or reputation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can you plan for a crisis? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You must plan </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The expected unexpected </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. The crisis communication plan <ul><li>Assign crisis responsibilities in advance </li></ul><ul><li>Designate and train a spokesperson </li></ul><ul><li>Anticipate crisis categories </li></ul><ul><li>Create a general fact sheet </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain a media list </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain a constituent notification list </li></ul>
    13. 13. When a crisis hits <ul><li>Activate your plan </li></ul><ul><li>Field media requests </li></ul><ul><li>Get all the facts </li></ul><ul><li>Consider responses </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Operational </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Perceptual </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Determine key messages </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor media (including Internet) </li></ul>
    14. 14. Basic public communication <ul><li>Get your story out quickly </li></ul><ul><li>Tell the truth </li></ul><ul><li>Be consistent </li></ul><ul><li>Notify constituencies </li></ul><ul><li>Respond to media and keep a log </li></ul><ul><li>Correct errors </li></ul>
    15. 15. The message <ul><li>Plain language </li></ul><ul><li>Facts only </li></ul><ul><li>Stress key points </li></ul>
    16. 16. After it’s over <ul><li>Review operation of plan </li></ul><ul><li>Review success of messages </li></ul><ul><li>Update plan </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare for the next one </li></ul>
    17. 17. Video exercises <ul><li>Review scenarios </li></ul><ul><li>Frame message points </li></ul><ul><li>Draft message </li></ul><ul><li>Select location and method of delivery </li></ul><ul><li>Meet the media </li></ul>
    18. 18. Wrap up <ul><li>Media’s job is not to make you look good. </li></ul><ul><li>Crisis communication </li></ul><ul><li>Interview skills </li></ul>
    19. 19. Conclusion <ul><li>Questions </li></ul><ul><li>Thanks for your attention </li></ul>
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