FC/FCoE                                            Topologies, Protocols                                            and Li...
Abstract An in-depth discussion of FC and FCoE  protocols focusing on        – topologies currently supported        – to...
Goals Describe technical benefits and limitations of  both FC and FCoE Describe currently supported FC and FCoE  topolog...
Agenda FC or Ethernet FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI Supported Topologies Best Practices Futures© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporati...
FC or Ethernet          Today© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.   5
FC or Ethernet                                                         32G   ??                                           ...
FC or Ethernet                                                         32G   ??                                           ...
FC or Ethernet                                                         32G   ??                                           ...
FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now                                                                 ...
FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now                                                                 ...
FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now                                                                 ...
FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now                                                                 ...
FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now                                                                 ...
FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now                                                                 ...
FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now                                                                 ...
FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now                                                         Physical...
FC or Ethernet Summary Ethernet wins eventually        – There’s still plenty of time to decide what this          means ...
Agenda FC or Ethernet FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI        – FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI        – FC vs. FCoE Supported Topologies Best ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI It’s more about what’s right for your  environment and less about which protocol  is better© Copyright ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                                  Latency (usec)Store and Forward             Cut through...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                                   Latency (usec)                             SAS        ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                                   Latency (usec)                             SAS        ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI      Host 1               A                                     Fabric (FC or DCB)               B      ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI      Host 1               A                                     Fabric (FC or DCB)               B      ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI      Host 1               A                                     Fabric (FC or DCB)               B      ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI      Host 1               A                                         LAN               B      Host 2     ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…© Copyright 2012 EMC...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI                                            FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…                    ...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Management during runtime        – FC/FCoE perform some amount of self          documentation due to FC...
FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Summary It’s more about what’s right for your  environment and less about which protocol  is better    ...
FC vs. FCoE Essentially the same in terms of        –    Network-centric        –    Similar management tools        –   ...
FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports        – Physical FC versus Physical Ethernet        – Point-to-point links c...
FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports        – Point-to-point links cannot be assumed© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporati...
FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports        – Point-to-point links cannot be assumed                Must support F...
FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports        – Point-to-point links cannot be assumed© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporati...
FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports        – Point-to-point links cannot be assumed                              ...
FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports        – Point to point links cannot be assumed DO NOT DO THIS! Only one Fabr...
FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports        – FCoE uses PFC instead of BB_Credit                 ▪ Distance implic...
FC vs. FCoE                                                         +16                                    +16            ...
FC vs. FCoE© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.   52
FC vs. FCoE                                                          Buffer reaches                                       ...
FC vs. FCoE   Effective  bandwidth10G                                                                     Distance        ...
FC vs. FCoE Summary FCoE is FC        –    Management tools        –    Basic concepts        –    Multipathing        – ...
Agenda FC or Ethernet FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI Supported Topologies        – General Guidelines        – Vendor-Specific ...
Supported TopologiesGeneral Guidelines FC        –    Maximum 5 hops        –    Maximum 55 domains        –    Maximum 6...
Supported TopologiesGeneral Guidelines FCoE        –    All FC guidelines apply (including multi-hop)        –    Heterog...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific There are at least 100 possible topologies        – Refer to either of the EMC FCoE T...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – End Device Connectivity                                                     ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – End Device Connectivity                                                     ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – End Device Connectivity                                                     ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – End Device Connectivity                                                     ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – End Device Connectivity                                                     ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – Network Connectivity                                      FC                ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – Network Connectivity                                      FC                ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – Network Connectivity                                      FC                ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – FIP Snooping Bridge Support                                                 ...
Supported TopologiesCisco Summary Over 100 supported Cisco topologies are  described in the FCoE TechBook Extensive supp...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – End Device Connectivity                                                   ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – End Device Connectivity                                                   ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – End Device Connectivity                                                   ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – End Device Connectivity                                                   ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – End Device Connectivity                                                   ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – Network Connectivity                                      FC              ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – Network Connectivity                                      FC              ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – Network Connectivity                                      FC              ...
Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – FIP Snooping Bridge                                                       ...
Supported TopologiesBrocade Summary A number of supported Brocade topologies  are described in the FCoE TechBook Support...
Agenda FC or Ethernet FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI Supported Topologies Best Practices Futures© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporati...
Best Practices Maximum hops Maximum N_Ports Single Initiator Zoning Monitor for bit errors© Copyright 2012 EMC Corpora...
Best Practice – Max Hops Best practice        – Do not exceed 5 hops Reason        – Concern about data corruption      ...
Best Practice – Max HopsExample: 4 - Layer 2 Ethernet Hops                                             4 Ethernet switches...
Best Practice – Max HopsExample:                                                  3 FC Hops                               ...
Best Practice – Max Hops Switches contain queues        – Used for buffering        – These queues have a “hold time” val...
Best Practice – Max Hops R_A_TOV     – Maximum life span of a frame x 2 (FC-FS)     – Typically 10 seconds R_A_TOV >= (ma...
Best Practice – Max Hops                     Ethernet (Row)                             FC SAN    Sw mod           Host  B...
Best Practice – Max Hops                     Ethernet (Row)                             FC SAN            ToR             ...
Best Practice – Max Hops                     Ethernet (Row)                             FC SAN            ToR             ...
Best Practice – Max Hops                     Ethernet (Row)                                 FC SAN            ToR         ...
Best Practice – Max Hops                     Ethernet (Row)                                 FC SAN            ToR         ...
Best Practice – Max Hops                     Ethernet (Row)                                 FC SAN            ToR         ...
Best Practice – Max Hops Summary Do not exceed 5 hops        – If you must, ensure that the configuration will          n...
Best Practice – Max N_Ports Best practice        – The number of N_Ports should not exceed 6000 Reason        – Original...
Best Practice – Max N_Ports© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.   95
Best Practice – Max N_Ports© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.   96
Best Practice – Max N_Ports Summary Do not exceed the maximum number of  N_Ports supported        – Results will be unpre...
Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Best practice        – Each zone should only contain one initiator and          t...
Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning      Host 1               A                                     Fabric (FC or DCB)...
Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning      Host 1               A                                     Fabric (FC or DCB)...
Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning      Host 1               A                                     Fabric (FC or DCB)...
Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning      Host 1               A                                     Fabric (FC or DCB)...
Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Initiator login with Single Initiator Zoning© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All...
Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Initiator login without Zoning© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserv...
Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning      Host 1               A                                     Fabric (FC or DCB)...
Single Initiator Zoning Summary Use single Initiator / single target Zoning if  at all possible If not possible or pract...
Monitor for Bit Errors Best practice        – Monitor for bit errors Reason        – VERY bad for performance        – F...
Agenda FC or Ethernet FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI Supported Topologies Best Practices Futures        – TDZ        – Network...
Futures — Target Driven Zoning (TDZ)   • TDZ is an EMC initiative aimed at     automating the provisioning of networked   ...
Futures – Network Virtualization   • Network Virtualization            – Generic term being used to describe “Overlay     ...
Futures   • Join us for more information!   • Birds-of-a-Feather: Storage Networking for     the Future            – Time:...
In Summary Physical FC will be around for a while Migrating to Ethernet        – Can be done at any time        – Does n...
Additional information Please check out my blog        www.brasstacksblog.typepad.com© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. Al...
Additional information Or follow me on twitter!                                                   @ErikSmith7© Copyright ...
Q&A© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.   115
Provide Feedback & Win!                                                          125 attendees will receive              ...
© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.   117
FC/FCoE - Topologies, Protocols, and Limitations ( EMC World 2012 )
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FC/FCoE - Topologies, Protocols, and Limitations ( EMC World 2012 )

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An in-depth discussion of the FC and FCoE protocols focusing on the topologies that are currently supported, those under development and any known issues. The current EMC best practices are also reviewed and the reasons behind them explained.

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FC/FCoE - Topologies, Protocols, and Limitations ( EMC World 2012 )

  1. 1. FC/FCoE Topologies, Protocols and Limitations Erik Smith Consulting Technologist – Connectrix BU© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 1
  2. 2. Abstract An in-depth discussion of FC and FCoE protocols focusing on – topologies currently supported – topologies under development – known issues Review of current EMC SAN best practices and reasons behind them© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 2
  3. 3. Goals Describe technical benefits and limitations of both FC and FCoE Describe currently supported FC and FCoE topologies and EMC-recommended best practices Discuss known limitations with FC and FCoE© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 3
  4. 4. Agenda FC or Ethernet FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI Supported Topologies Best Practices Futures© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 4
  5. 5. FC or Ethernet Today© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 5
  6. 6. FC or Ethernet 32G ?? Fibre Channel 16G Today© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 6
  7. 7. FC or Ethernet 32G ?? Fibre Channel 16G Today ?? 10G 40/100G Ethernet© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 7
  8. 8. FC or Ethernet 32G ?? Fibre Channel 16G Today ?? 10G 40/100G Ethernet If you’re asking yourself this question, you’re not alone© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 8
  9. 9. FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now Physical Fibre Channel Today Time Line Physical Ethernet© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 9
  10. 10. FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now Physical Fibre Channel Today Time Line Physical Ethernet Host Network Storage© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 10
  11. 11. FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now Physical Fibre Channel Today Physical Ethernet Host Network Storage© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 11
  12. 12. FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now Physical Fibre Channel Today Physical Ethernet Host Network Storage© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 12
  13. 13. FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now Physical Fibre Channel Today Physical Ethernet FC FC FC Host Network Storage© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 13
  14. 14. FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now Physical Fibre Channel Today Physical Ethernet FCoE FC Host Network Storage© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 14
  15. 15. FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now Physical Fibre Channel Today Physical Ethernet Host Network Storage© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 15
  16. 16. FC or Ethernet You don’t really need to decide right now Physical Fibre Channel Today Physical Ethernet© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 16
  17. 17. FC or Ethernet Summary Ethernet wins eventually – There’s still plenty of time to decide what this means to you Migrating to Ethernet does not equal rip and replace all FC – Evolutionary versus Revolutionary© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 17
  18. 18. Agenda FC or Ethernet FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI – FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI – FC vs. FCoE Supported Topologies Best Practices Futures© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 18
  19. 19. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI It’s more about what’s right for your environment and less about which protocol is better© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 19
  20. 20. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Latency (usec)Store and Forward Cut through 0 5 10 15 20 25© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 20
  21. 21. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Latency (usec) SAS FC SSD >=10xStore and Forward Cut through 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 21
  22. 22. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Latency (usec) SAS FC SSD >=325xStore and Forward Cut through 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 With block I/O, uncongested network latency is practically a rounding error© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 22
  23. 23. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Host 1 A Fabric (FC or DCB) B Host 2 A Storage 1A B Host 3 Storage 2A A B Host 4 Storage 1B A B Host 5 Storage 2B A B Host 6 A B© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 23
  24. 24. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Host 1 A Fabric (FC or DCB) B Host 2 A Storage 1A B Zone 1 Host 3 Storage 2A A Zone 2 B Host 4 Storage 1B A B Host 5 Storage 2B A Zones are created by grouping the WWPNs of the B Host 6 host interface and storage interface into a “zone”. A B The set of zones created are put into a “zone set” and activated on the fabric.© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 24
  25. 25. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Host 1 A Fabric (FC or DCB) B Host 2 A Storage 1A B Zone 1 Zone 3 Host 3 Storage 2A Zone 5 A Zone 2 B Zone 4 Zone 7 6 Zone Host 4 Storage 1B Zone 9 A B Zone 11 Zone 8 Zone 10 Host 5 Storage 2B A Zone 12 B Host 6 A The number of zones in the fabric should always be B greater than, or equal to, the number of initiators in the fabric.© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 25
  26. 26. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Host 1 A LAN B Host 2 A Storage 1A B Host 3 Storage 2A A B Host 4 Storage 1B A B Host 5 Storage 2B A B Host 6 With iSCSI, each host needs to be individually and manually pointed at a storage port by specifying A B either an IP Address, IQN, or both.© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 26
  27. 27. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps…© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 27
  28. 28. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on Total host network storage© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 28
  29. 29. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Total host network storage Windows Linux VMware© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 29
  30. 30. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC Windows FCoE iSCSI FC Linux FCoE iSCSI FC VMware FCoE iSCSI© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 30
  31. 31. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC 7 Windows FCoE 7 iSCSI 7 FC 7 Linux FCoE 7 iSCSI 7 FC 7 VMware FCoE 7 iSCSI 7© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 31
  32. 32. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC 2 7 Windows FCoE 7 iSCSI 7 FC 1 7 Linux FCoE 7 iSCSI 7 FC 1 7 VMware FCoE 7 iSCSI 7© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 32
  33. 33. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC 2 5 7 Windows FCoE 7 iSCSI 7 FC 1 5 7 Linux FCoE 7 iSCSI 7 FC 1 5 7 VMware FCoE 7 iSCSI 7© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 33
  34. 34. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC 2 5 7 14 Windows FCoE 7 iSCSI 7 FC 1 5 7 13 Linux FCoE 7 iSCSI 7 FC 1 5 7 13 VMware FCoE 7 iSCSI 7© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 34
  35. 35. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC 2 5 7 14 Windows FCoE 7 iSCSI 19 7 FC 1 5 7 13 Linux FCoE 7 iSCSI 14 7 FC 1 5 7 13 VMware FCoE 7 iSCSI 23 7© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 35
  36. 36. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC 2 5 7 14 Windows FCoE 7 iSCSI 19 7 7 FC 1 5 7 13 Linux FCoE 7 iSCSI 14 7 7 FC 1 5 7 13 VMware FCoE 7 iSCSI 23 7 7© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 36
  37. 37. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC 2 5 7 14 Windows FCoE 7 iSCSI 19 7 7 33 FC 1 5 7 13 Linux FCoE 7 iSCSI 14 7 7 28 FC 1 5 7 13 VMware FCoE 7 iSCSI 23 7 7 37© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 37
  38. 38. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC 2 5 7 14 Windows FCoE 2 7 iSCSI 19 7 7 33 FC 1 5 7 13 Linux FCoE 1 7 iSCSI 14 7 7 28 FC 1 5 7 13 VMware FCoE 1 7 iSCSI 23 7 7 37© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 38
  39. 39. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC 2 5 7 14 Windows FCoE 2 37 7 iSCSI 19 7 7 33 FC 1 5 7 13 Linux FCoE 1 37 7 iSCSI 14 7 7 28 FC 1 5 7 13 VMware FCoE 1 37 7 iSCSI 23 7 7 37© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 39
  40. 40. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI provisioning steps… ...on …on ...on OS Protocol Total host network storage FC 2 5 7 14 Windows FCoE 2 37 7 46 iSCSI 19 7 7 33 FC 1 5 7 13 Linux FCoE 1 37 7 45 iSCSI 14 7 7 28 FC 1 5 7 13 VMware FCoE 1 37 7 45 iSCSI 23 7 7 37© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 40
  41. 41. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Management during runtime – FC/FCoE perform some amount of self documentation due to FC Login and Name Server registrations© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 41
  42. 42. FC/FCoE vs. iSCSI Summary It’s more about what’s right for your environment and less about which protocol is better – Network/Network stack latency are not currently the best place to focus on to reduce response time – EMC believes ▪ Network-centric is better suited for larger environments ▪ End-node-centric is better suited for smaller environments© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 42
  43. 43. FC vs. FCoE Essentially the same in terms of – Network-centric – Similar management tools – Same multipathing software (for iSCSI as well) – Similar basic port types ▪ N_Ports / F_Ports vs. VN_Ports and VF_Ports ▪ E_Ports vs. VE_Ports – Same scalability limits ▪ Number of domains ▪ Number of N_Ports / VN_Ports ▪ Number of hops© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 43
  44. 44. FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports – Physical FC versus Physical Ethernet – Point-to-point links cannot be assumed with FCoE – FCoE uses PFC instead of BB_Credit ▪ Distance implications© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 44
  45. 45. FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports – Point-to-point links cannot be assumed© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 45
  46. 46. FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports – Point-to-point links cannot be assumed Must support FIP Snooping© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 46
  47. 47. FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports – Point-to-point links cannot be assumed© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 47
  48. 48. FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports – Point-to-point links cannot be assumed VLAN 1 VLAN 2© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 48
  49. 49. FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports – Point to point links cannot be assumed DO NOT DO THIS! Only one Fabric per VLAN© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 49
  50. 50. FC vs. FCoE Completely different transports – FCoE uses PFC instead of BB_Credit ▪ Distance implications© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 50
  51. 51. FC vs. FCoE +16 +16 15 14 0 Waiting for R_RDY© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 51
  52. 52. FC vs. FCoE© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 52
  53. 53. FC vs. FCoE Buffer reaches High water mark© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 53
  54. 54. FC vs. FCoE Effective bandwidth10G Distance 1k 5k Max Max+x© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 54
  55. 55. FC vs. FCoE Summary FCoE is FC – Management tools – Basic concepts – Multipathing – Scalability limits Transport use has implications – Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should ▪ One fabric per VLAN ▪ Pay attention to topologies that are being created – Do not use FCoE for distances that exceed the maximum supported by the hardware vendor© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 55
  56. 56. Agenda FC or Ethernet FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI Supported Topologies – General Guidelines – Vendor-Specific Best Practices Futures© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 56
  57. 57. Supported TopologiesGeneral Guidelines FC – Maximum 5 hops – Maximum 55 domains – Maximum 6000 N_Ports – Maximum 10,000 N_Ports per L3 SAN – Avoid heterogeneous FC-SW interop (please) ▪ Use NPIV if possible© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 57
  58. 58. Supported TopologiesGeneral Guidelines FCoE – All FC guidelines apply (including multi-hop) – Heterogeneous FC-SW interop is not supported – When possible, connect directly to an FCF – When not possible, use a FIP Snooping Bridge© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 58
  59. 59. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific There are at least 100 possible topologies – Refer to either of the EMC FCoE TechBooks© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 59
  60. 60. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – End Device Connectivity EMC N7k MDS N5k FC N2k FCoE Host© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 60
  61. 61. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – End Device Connectivity EMC N7k MDS N5k FC N2k FCoE Host© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 61
  62. 62. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – End Device Connectivity EMC N7k MDS N5k FC N2k FCoE Host© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 62
  63. 63. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – End Device Connectivity EMC N7k MDS N5k FC N2k FCoE Host© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 63
  64. 64. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – End Device Connectivity EMC N7k MDS N5k FC N2k FCoE Host© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 64
  65. 65. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – Network Connectivity FC FCoE N7k MDS N5k FC Fabric N2k© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 65
  66. 66. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – Network Connectivity FC FCoE N7k MDS N5k FC Fabric N2k© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 66
  67. 67. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – Network Connectivity FC FCoE N7k MDS N5k FC Fabric N2k© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 67
  68. 68. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Cisco – FIP Snooping Bridge Support FCoE N7k MDS N5k FSB© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 68
  69. 69. Supported TopologiesCisco Summary Over 100 supported Cisco topologies are described in the FCoE TechBook Extensive support for multi-hop FCoE Support for FIP Snooping Bridges Connectivity to existing FC SAN does not require the use of an FC router© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 69
  70. 70. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – End Device Connectivity EMC DCX VDX 8000 FC FCoE Host© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 70
  71. 71. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – End Device Connectivity EMC DCX VDX 8000 FC FCoE Host© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 71
  72. 72. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – End Device Connectivity EMC DCX VDX 8000 FC FCoE Host© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 72
  73. 73. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – End Device Connectivity EMC DCX VDX 8000 FC FCoE Host© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 73
  74. 74. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – End Device Connectivity EMC DCX VDX 8000 FC FCoE Host© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 74
  75. 75. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – Network Connectivity FC FCoE EEx DCX 8000 FC Fabric VCS EEx VDX IR VDX© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 75
  76. 76. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – Network Connectivity FC FCoE EEx 8000 Ex DCX FC Fabric VCS EEx VDX IR Ex VDX© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 76
  77. 77. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – Network Connectivity FC FCoE EEx 8000 Ex DCX FC Fabric VCS EEx VDX IR Ex VDX© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 77
  78. 78. Supported TopologiesVendor-Specific – Brocade – FIP Snooping Bridge FCoE Brocade FSB© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 78
  79. 79. Supported TopologiesBrocade Summary A number of supported Brocade topologies are described in the FCoE TechBook Support for multi-hop FCoE in VCS only No support for FIP Snooping Bridges Connectivity to existing FC SAN requires the use of an FC router© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 79
  80. 80. Agenda FC or Ethernet FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI Supported Topologies Best Practices Futures© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 80
  81. 81. Best Practices Maximum hops Maximum N_Ports Single Initiator Zoning Monitor for bit errors© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 81
  82. 82. Best Practice – Max Hops Best practice – Do not exceed 5 hops Reason – Concern about data corruption – Concern about fabric segmentation in certain circumstances© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 82
  83. 83. Best Practice – Max HopsExample: 4 - Layer 2 Ethernet Hops 4 Ethernet switches© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 83
  84. 84. Best Practice – Max HopsExample: 3 FC Hops 4 FC switches© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 84
  85. 85. Best Practice – Max Hops Switches contain queues – Used for buffering – These queues have a “hold time” value associated with them Queue hold time – Length of time a frame is held before it’s discarded – Typically between 500ms and 2 seconds© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 85
  86. 86. Best Practice – Max Hops R_A_TOV – Maximum life span of a frame x 2 (FC-FS) – Typically 10 seconds R_A_TOV >= (max hops * Hold time) * 2© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 86
  87. 87. Best Practice – Max Hops Ethernet (Row) FC SAN Sw mod Host Blade Server Rack Rack© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 87
  88. 88. Best Practice – Max Hops Ethernet (Row) FC SAN ToR 1 Sw mod Host Blade Server Rack Rack© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 88
  89. 89. Best Practice – Max Hops Ethernet (Row) FC SAN ToR 2 EoR 1 Sw mod Host Blade Server Rack Rack© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 89
  90. 90. Best Practice – Max Hops Ethernet (Row) FC SAN ToR 2 3 SAN EoR Core 1 Sw mod Host Blade Server Rack Rack© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 90
  91. 91. Best Practice – Max Hops Ethernet (Row) FC SAN ToR 2 3 SAN EoR Core 1 4 Sw mod SAN Host Core Blade Server Rack Rack© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 91
  92. 92. Best Practice – Max Hops Ethernet (Row) FC SAN ToR 2 3 SAN EoR Core 1 4 Sw mod SAN Host Core 5 Blade Server Storage Rack Rack© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 92
  93. 93. Best Practice – Max Hops Summary Do not exceed 5 hops – If you must, ensure that the configuration will never create a condition where frames older than ½ of R_A_TOV will exist ▪ IOW, you need to know the hold time for every element ▪ Consider error conditions and failures Links between any network elements that contain buffers must be counted as a FC Hop – This includes FSBs and NPIV Gateways© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 93
  94. 94. Best Practice – Max N_Ports Best practice – The number of N_Ports should not exceed 6000 Reason – Originally ▪ Testing revealed fabric segmentation due to HLO timeout between switches with around 1000 N_Ports© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 94
  95. 95. Best Practice – Max N_Ports© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 95
  96. 96. Best Practice – Max N_Ports© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 96
  97. 97. Best Practice – Max N_Ports Summary Do not exceed the maximum number of N_Ports supported – Results will be unpredictable – In extreme cases, fabric segmentation can result© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 97
  98. 98. Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Best practice – Each zone should only contain one initiator and the targets it will access Reason – Originally ▪ Concern about initiators logging in to other initiators – Today ▪ Limits the number of name server queries that are sent to the switch ▪ Related to Max N_Ports ▪ Recommended still due to its use in test configurations© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 98
  99. 99. Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Host 1 A Fabric (FC or DCB) B Host 2 A Storage 1A B Host 3 Storage 2A A B Host 4 Storage 1B A B Host 5 Storage 2B A B Host 6 A B© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 99
  100. 100. Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Host 1 A Fabric (FC or DCB) B Host 2 A Storage 1A B Host 3 Storage 2A A B Host 4 Storage 1B A B Host 5 Storage 2B A B Host 6 A B© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 100
  101. 101. Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Host 1 A Fabric (FC or DCB) B Host 2 A Storage 1A B Host 3 Storage 2A A B Host 4 Storage 1B A B Host 5 Storage 2B A B Host 6 Without zoning, the response would include information about 15 other N_Ports. A B© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 101
  102. 102. Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Host 1 A Fabric (FC or DCB) B Host 2 A Storage 1A B Host 3 Storage 2A A B Host 4 Storage 1B A B Host 5 Storage 2B A B Host 6 A For each N_Port returned in the NS Response, host will query B the Name Server for additional information. If a host only needs to access 1 Target this means 14 extra NS queries per N_Port.© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 102
  103. 103. Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Initiator login with Single Initiator Zoning© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 103
  104. 104. Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Initiator login without Zoning© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 104
  105. 105. Best Practice – Single Initiator Zoning Host 1 A Fabric (FC or DCB) B Host 2 A Storage 1A B Host 3 Storage 2A A B Host 4 Storage 1B A B Host 5 Storage 2B A B Host 6 A Host will attempt PLOGI/PRLI with all N_Ports and perform B report LUNs with all Targets.© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 105
  106. 106. Single Initiator Zoning Summary Use single Initiator / single target Zoning if at all possible If not possible or practical – e.g., some VMware and RecoverPoint environments – Learn to watch for the signs ▪ Randomly missing N_Port logins during power on or after link events ▪ Elongated boot times – Target Driven Zoning will help when available!© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 106
  107. 107. Monitor for Bit Errors Best practice – Monitor for bit errors Reason – VERY bad for performance – FC – Buffer loss – FCoE – Bit errors can cause unintentional data distribution ▪ An I/O convergence issue not an FCoE one© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 107
  108. 108. Agenda FC or Ethernet FC vs. FCoE vs. iSCSI Supported Topologies Best Practices Futures – TDZ – Network Virtualization© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 108
  109. 109. Futures — Target Driven Zoning (TDZ) • TDZ is an EMC initiative aimed at automating the provisioning of networked storage • TDZ allows for the SAN to automatically configure zoning based on information provided to it by a storage port • TDZ makes use of Peer Zoning – Approved in FC-GS-6 and FC-SW-6© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 109
  110. 110. Futures – Network Virtualization • Network Virtualization – Generic term being used to describe “Overlay Networks” – Encapsulations being discussed to support this functionality are • NVGRE • VXLAN • STT – Could be very disruptive to today’s SANs© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 110
  111. 111. Futures • Join us for more information! • Birds-of-a-Feather: Storage Networking for the Future – Time: Tuesday 1:30p – Room: Marcello 4401 A© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 111
  112. 112. In Summary Physical FC will be around for a while Migrating to Ethernet – Can be done at any time – Does not require rip and replace Follow Best practices – Unless you have a compelling reason not to – Understand the risks The EMC FCoE Tech books – contain hundreds of supported topologies; and – detailed installation instructions© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 112
  113. 113. Additional information Please check out my blog www.brasstacksblog.typepad.com© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 113
  114. 114. Additional information Or follow me on twitter! @ErikSmith7© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 114
  115. 115. Q&A© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 115
  116. 116. Provide Feedback & Win!  125 attendees will receive $100 iTunes gift cards. To enter the raffle, simply complete: – 5 sessions surveys – The conference survey  Download the EMC World Conference App to learn more: emcworld.com/app© Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 116
  117. 117. © Copyright 2012 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved. 117
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