Writing Performance Objectives:          An Overview           Emily Mross
The Dick and Carey Model    Write    Performance    Objectives                    http://gminks.edublogs.org/files/2008/11...
Objectives Given the terms “Performance Objective” and  “Instructional Goal,” students will be able to  define the terms ...
Performance Objectives Performance objectives create guidelines for  instructional designers, students, or both – they  i...
Performance Objectives v. InstructionalGoals Instructional Goals are broad statements about a  unit or topic. Think of th...
Breaking down the PerformanceObjective Performance objectives describe three main things:   Content/Behavior – What skil...
The Performance ObjectiveUsing EBSCOHost, students will be able to conducta search and locate two peer-reviewed articlespu...
Writing Effective Objectives Stick to tasks that can be observed. “Knowing”  and “understanding” can’t truly be observed ...
Try it out! Please visit the discussion board to try writing a few objectives of your own, for a topic/lesson of your cho...
Resources Dick, W., & Carey, J.O. (2009). The systematic design of instruction. Allyn & Bacon.
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Writing performance objectives: An Overview

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Writing performance objectives: An Overview

  1. 1. Writing Performance Objectives: An Overview Emily Mross
  2. 2. The Dick and Carey Model Write Performance Objectives http://gminks.edublogs.org/files/2008/11/dickandcareymode l.gif
  3. 3. Objectives Given the terms “Performance Objective” and “Instructional Goal,” students will be able to define the terms and compare and contrast the characteristics of each with at least 90% accuracy. Using a self-selected mini-lesson topic, students will be able to write their own performance objectives that describe behaviors, conditions and criteria and post them to the discussion forum. Using the discussion forum, students will be able to critique and generate constructive feedback on the performance objectives of their peers within a 10-minute period.
  4. 4. Performance Objectives Performance objectives create guidelines for instructional designers, students, or both – they identifies the skill(s) to be learned, and the criteria for mastery of a given lesson. It may also be called a behavioral objective, learning objective, and instructional objective. Writing performance objectives engages the previous steps of the instructional design process: instructional goals, instructional analysis, and learner/context analysis. All have bearing on the performance objectives.
  5. 5. Performance Objectives v. InstructionalGoals Instructional Goals are broad statements about a unit or topic. Think of them as a large target. Performance Objectives take the Big Picture goals and break them down into precise details. Think of your objectives as the arrows you are trying to hit the target with. Performance Objectives pertain directly to tasks or skills to be learned. Performance Objectives describe a behavior in a way that can be quantified.
  6. 6. Breaking down the PerformanceObjective Performance objectives describe three main things:  Content/Behavior – What skill(s) will be demonstrated?  Conditions – What will the learner need to demonstrate the skill? How/where will it be demonstrated?  Criteria – How will the skill be evaluated? What constitutes success?
  7. 7. The Performance ObjectiveUsing EBSCOHost, students will be able to conducta search and locate two peer-reviewed articlespublished within the last five years on a topic ofone’s choice within a five-minute period.Green -- ConditionsBlue – Behavior/contentRed - Criteria
  8. 8. Writing Effective Objectives Stick to tasks that can be observed. “Knowing” and “understanding” can’t truly be observed (Dick and Carey, 116). Design criteria that can be measured, such as the ability to define given terms, describe a process, or label a chart. Remember to include any materials necessary to the tasks to be performed. Define the amount of accuracy required to constitute success. How often will the student need to perform the task correctly? Is there a specific time frame?
  9. 9. Try it out! Please visit the discussion board to try writing a few objectives of your own, for a topic/lesson of your choice. Remember to identify the three parts of the objective. Read the performance objectives written by your classmates. Respond to at least two other objectives with constructive feedback for improvement.
  10. 10. Resources Dick, W., & Carey, J.O. (2009). The systematic design of instruction. Allyn & Bacon.
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