• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Why Do You Know So Much About Me
 

Why Do You Know So Much About Me

on

  • 1,372 views

This is the 9th lecture of my Interactive Global & Regional Marketing course. This lecture covers privacy in the digital age.

This is the 9th lecture of my Interactive Global & Regional Marketing course. This lecture covers privacy in the digital age.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,372
Views on SlideShare
1,370
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
33
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

http://emagine-group.com 2

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Why Do You Know So Much About Me Why Do You Know So Much About Me Presentation Transcript

    • Why
Do
You
Know
So
Much
About
Me?
 Privacy
in
the
Digital
Age

    • Not
talking
about
surveillance
Not
talking
about
the
government
But
rather
The
voluntary
disclosure
of
personal
information
to
private
institutions

    • We
say
one
thing.
 I
want
my
privacy.
 We
do
something
else.
Here’s
my
data.
Take
what
you
want.
 (just
give
me
my
stuff)

    • 43%
of
online
users
claim
that
they
are
likely
to
read
the
privacy
policy
of
a
website
before
buying
anything

    • What
Privacy
Statements
Say

    • 26%
actually
consulted
the
privacy
policy
Even
more
odd,
there
was
no
difference
between
privacy
fundamentalists,
pragmatists,
or
the
unconcerned

    • 71%
want
to
control
who
can
access
their
personal
information

    • 75%
have
supplied
 50%
have
supplied
• First
name
 • Phone
number
• Last
name
 • Birthday
• E‐mail
 • Credit
card
information
• Street
address

    • “You
have
zero
privacy.
Get
over
it”
Scott
McNealy
Former
CEO
Sun
Microsystems

    • “If
you
have
something
you
don’t
anyone
to
know,
maybe
you
shouldn’t
be
doing
it
in
the
first
place.”
Eric
Schmidt
Former
Google
CEO

    • “People
have
gotten
more
comfortable
not
only
sharing
more
information,
but
more
openly
and
with
more
people.”
Mark
Zukerberg
Facebook
CEO

    • What
do
you
think
privacy
is?

    • Privacy
is….?
  Secrecy,
Concealment,
Seclusion,
Solitude,
 Confidentiality,
Anonymity
  Prejudicial
Information
  Personally
Identifiable
Information
(PII)
  Whatever
you
want
it
to
be

    • Privacy
is
the
claim
of
individuals,
groups,
or
institutions
to
determine
for
themselves
when,
how,
and
to
what
extent
information
about
them
is
communicated
to
others.

    • Viewed
in
terms
of
the
relation
of
the
individual
to
social
participation,
privacy
is
the
voluntary
and
temporary
withdrawal
of
a
person
from
a
general
society
into
a
condition
of
anonymity
or
reserve.

    • Privacy
is
the
ability
of
an
individual
or
group
to
seclude
themselves
or
information
about
themselves
and
thereby
reveal
themselves
selectively.

    • Privacy
in
Colonial
America
  Find
an
open
field
to
talk
  Sneak
off
into
the
woods
  No
privacy
indoors
  Churches
encouraged
neighbors
to
snoop
on
each
other

    • Privacy
in
the
1800s
  Long‐distance
communication
by
telegraph
  Letters
  Concern
about
invasive
press
  Snooping
discouraged
  Gossip,
Word
of
Mouth

    • Privacy
from
1900
‐
1965
  First
bugging
device
  Search
of
electronic
conversations
constitutional
  Telephone
communications
over
wires
  Cold
War
prompts
government
to
increase
surveillance
 of
civilians
without
their
knowledge

    • Privacy
from
1965
‐
1990
  Watergate
Scandal
  Personal
computers
  Public‐key
encryption
invented
  Internet
emerged
  Sensationalist
journalism

    • Privacy
from
1990
‐
2001
  No
privacy
for
public
figures
  Wireless
communication
  Cameras
  Satellites
  Confusion
over
who
owns
content
on
computer
networks

    • Privacy
After
September
11th

  Private
customer
information
divulged
to
federal
 authorities
hunting
for
terrorists
or
criminals
  Airport
searches
  Polls
in
the
US
indicated
that
people
think
that
the
1st
 amendment
of
the
US
Constitution
might
go
too
far

    • Total
Information
Awareness
  Post
9/11
project
to:
   [Create]
enormous
computer
databases
to
gather
and
store
 the
personal
information
in
the
United
States,
including
 personal
emails,
social
network
analysis,
credit
card
records,
 phone
calls,
medical
records,
and
numerous
other
sources,
 without
any
requirement
for
a
search
warrant.
Additionally,
 the
program
included
funding
for
a
biometric
surveillance
 technologies
that
could
identify
and
track
individuals
using
 surveillance
cameras
and
other
methods.

    • Television
&
Privacy
  1992
brought
the
launch
of
Reality
Television
where
 everyone’s
lives
became
public
consumption
  This
brought
about
shows
about
people:
   Living
together
in
homes
and
islands
   Families
struggling
with
personal
issues
   Celebrities
private
issues
made
public
   People
showing
off
their
stupidity
to
win
money
and
fame
  In
short,
Reality
TV
took
the
privacy
discussion
to
a
new
 level

    • Privacy
Today
  YouTube
has
ended
all
forms
of
personal
privacy
  Bloggers
have
made
their
personal
(and
their
friends/ acquaintances)
lives
topics
of
discussion
of
the
entire
 world
  And
then
came
social
networks….
  We
are
comfortable
sharing
our
lives
and
thoughts
 instantly
with
thousands
of
people
–
close
friends
and
 strangers
alike

    • Ways
Technology
Threatens
Privacy
  Phishing
   Cloud
Computing
  Malware
&
Spyware
   Electronic
Medical
Data
  Social
Networking
sites
   Public
Wi‐Fi
  Photo
&
Video
Sharing
   Retail
Loyalty
Cards
  Web
History
   Workplace
Computers
  Targeted
Advertising
&
   Cell
Phones
 Cookies

    • Why
Privacy
Has
Changed?
  Curiosity
  Convenience
  The
Internet
and
Evolving
Technology
  Social
Trends
  Desire
to
relate
&
share
with
others
  Identity
  Fame
  Posterity

    • The
primary
business
model
of
today’s
most
successful
corporation
is
the
monetization
in
the
mass
collection,
correlation
&
analysis
of
individual
private
data

    • Private
Info
Monetized
  Acxiom
–
750
billion
pieces
of
information
or
1,500
facts
on
½
 billion
people
   Correlate
“consumer”
info
from
signups,
surveys,
magazine
 subscriptions
   USD
1.
38
billion
turnover
for
FY2008
  Colligent
–
Actionable
consumer
research
derived
from
social
 networks
  Rapleaf
–
450
million
social
network
profiles
   Submit
request
and
aggregated
social
network
profiles
returned
 within
a
day
  Phorm
   Uses
“behavioral
keywords”
–
keywords
derived
from
a
combination
 of
search
terms,
URLs
and
even
contextual
page
analysis
over
time
–
 to
find
the
right
users

    • How
It
Affects
Us?

    • White’s
Taxonomy
of
Online
Privacy
Invasion
 Web

 Request
 Cross
Site
Tracking
 Rich
Browser
Environments
 Application
Data
 Aggregation,
Correlation
&
Meta‐Data

    • Taxonomy
–
Web
Request
  A
single
web
request
   An
image
on
a
website
  One
webpage
is
made
up
of
 multiple
requests
  What
They
Can
Find
Out
 Web

   Location
(Latitude,
Longitude,
 Request
 City,
Country)
   Language
   Operating
System
&
Browser
   What
site
you
came
from
   ISP
   Have
you
been
here
before?

    • Taxonomy
–
Cross
Site
Tracking
  Using
cookies
to
track
 across
computers
and
 affiliated
sites
  Cookie
is
stored
on
your
 computer
and
sent
with
 every
request
 Cross
Site
Tracking
  Cookies
usually
associated
 with
login
details
  What
They
Can
Find
Out
   Who
you
are
   What
sites
you
visit
   Behavioral
profiles

    • Taxonomy
–
Rich
Browser
Environments
  Rich
Web
2.0
Technologies
   JavaScript/AJAX
   Flash/Silverlight
  What
They
Can
Find
Out
   Browser
history
 Rich
Browser
   Clipboard
data
 Environments
   Key
presses
   Visual
stimulus
   Browser
plugins
   Desktop
display
 preferences

    • Taxonomy
–
Application
Data
  Rich
Information
Inputs
  Structured
&
Unstructured
 Data
   Search
requests
   E‐mails
   Calendar
items
 Application
Data
   Instant
Message
 Communications
  What
They
Can
Find
Out
   Who
you
are
   Who
your
friends
are
   What
you’re
doing
on
Sunday
   Your
Interests

    • Taxonomy
–
Aggregation,
Correlation
&
Meta
Data
  Combining
the
previous
levels
   Meta‐Data
–
Include
 interactions
with
applications
   Aggregation
–
combining
the
 information
from
various
 sources
   Correlation
–
normalizing
 Aggregation,

 entities
across
sources
 Correlation
&

  Provides
information
you
may
 Meta‐Data
 not
be
aware
of
  What
they
can
find
out
   Social
networks
   Behavioral
profiles
   Psychological
profiles
   Deep
databases

    • How
Does
Information
Get
Revealed?

    • By
ISPs
  ISPs
always
know
your
IP
address
and
the
IP
address
to
 which
you
are
communicating
  ISPs
are
capable
of
observing
unencrypted
data
passing
 between
you
and
the
Internet
but
not
properly‐ encrypted
data
  They
are
usually
prevented
to
do
so
due
to
social
 pressure
and
law

    • By
E‐Mail
  May
be
inappropriately
spread
by
the
original
receiver
  May
be
intercepted
  May
be
legally
viewed
or
disclosed
by
service
providers
 or
authorities

    • By
Discussion
Groups
  There
is
no
barrier
for
unsolicited
messages
or
emails
 within
a
mailing
list
or
online
discussion
group
  Any
member
of
the
list
or
group
could
collect
and
 distribute
your
email
address
and
information
you
post

    • By
Internet
Browsers
  Most
web
browsers
can
save
some
forms
of
personal
 data,
such
as
browsing
history,
cookies,
web
form
entries
 and
password
  You
may
accidentally
reveal
such
information
when
using
 a
browser
on
a
public
computer
or
someone
elses

    • By
Search
Engines
  Search
engines
have
and
use
the
ability
to
track
each
one
 of
your
searches
by
IP
address,
search
terms
and
time
of
 day

    • How
Do
We
Know
‐
AOL
  Aug
7,
06
‐
AOL
apologized
for
releasing
search
log
data
 on
subscribers
that
had
been
intended
for
use
with
the
 companys
newly
launched
research
site.

  Almost
two
weeks
before
that,
AOL
had
quietly
released
 roughly
twenty
million
search
record
from
658,000
users
 on
their
new
AOL
Research
site.

  The
data
includes
a
number
assigned
to
the
anonymous
 user,
the
search
term,
the
date
and
time
of
the
search,
 and
the
website(s)
visited
as
a
result
of
the
search.
  NY
Times
was
able
to
identify
several
users
by
cross‐ referencing
with
phonebooks/public
records

    • How
Do
We
Know
–
Department
of
Justice
  Jan
06,
the
US
Dept
of
Justice
issued
a
subpoena
asking
 popular
search
engines
to
provide
a
"random
sampling"
 of
1
million
IP
addresses
that
used
the
search
engine,
and
 a
random
sampling
of
1
million
search
queries
submitted
 over
a
one‐week
period.

  The
government
wanted
the
information
to
defend
a
 child
pornography
law.

  Microsoft,
Yahoo
and
AOL
complied
with
the
request,
 while
Google
fought
the
subpoena.

    • How
Do
We
Know
‐
Google
  Google
collects
massive
amounts
of
user
data
  Gmail
has
a
machine
reading
email
to
improve
the
 relevance
of
advertisements
displayed
  Google
Street
View
‐
public/private
property
&
people
 captured
in
images
  Search
histories
are
kept
for
two
years
and
identified
via
 a
cookie

    • By
Indirect
Marketing
  Web
bugs
‐
a
graphic
(in
a
website
or
a
graphic
enabled
 email)
that
can
confirm
when
the
message
or
web
page
 is
viewed
and
record
the
IP
address
of
the
viewer
  Third
party
cookies
‐
a
web
page
may
contain
images
or
 other
components
stored
on
servers
in
other
domains.
 Cookies
that
are
set
during
retrieval
of
these
 components
are
called
third‐party
cookies.

    • What
Are
Cookies?
  Cookies
are
data
packets
sent
by
a
server
to
a
web
client
 and
then
sent
back
unchanged
by
the
client
each
time
it
 accesses
that
server
  Cookies
are
used
for
authenticating,
session
tracking
and
 maintaining
specific
information
about
users,
such
as
site
 preferences
or
the
contents
of
their
electronic
shopping
 carts
  Cookies
are
only
data,
not
programs
or
viruses
  There
are
two
types
of
cookies
‐
persistent
and
non‐ persistent

    • Why
Don’t
We
Like
Cookies?
  Cookies
can
be
hijacked
and
modified
by
attackers
  Cookies
can
be
used
to
track
browsing
behavior
so
some
 think
they
are
tagged

    • By
Direct
Marketing
  Direct
marketing
is
a
sales
pitch
targeted
to
a
person
 based
on
previous
consumer
choices.
  It
is
common
these
days
  Many
companies
also
sell
or
share
your
information
to
 others.
This
sharing
with
other
businesses
can
be
done
 rapidly
and
cheaply

    • By
Instant
Messaging
  Your
IM
conversation
can
be
saved
onto
a
computer
even
 if
only
one
person
agrees
  Workplace
IM
can
be
monitored
by
your
employer
  SPIM
‐
Spam
distributed
in
IM

    • By
Employers
  76%
of
employers
monitor
employees
website
 connections
  65%
use
technology
to
blocked
connections
to
banned
 websites
  55%
monitor
email

    • By
Cybercrime
  Spyware
takes
advantage
of
security
holes
to
attack
the
 browser
and
force
it
to
be
downloaded
and
installed
to
 gather
information
without
your
knowledge
  Phishing
occurs
when
criminals
lure
the
victim
into
 providing
financial
data
to
an
unsecure
website
  Pharming
occurs
when
criminals
plant
programs
in
the
 victims
computer
which
redirect
the
victim
from
 legitimate
websites
to
scam
look‐alike
sites

    • Facebook
“Privacy”