2014 04 03 (educon2014) emadrid uam towards a collaborative pedagogical model in moocs
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2014 04 03 (educon2014) emadrid uam towards a collaborative pedagogical model in moocs

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2014 04 03

2014 04 03
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emadrid
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towards a collaborative pedagogical model in moocs

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    2014 04 03 (educon2014) emadrid uam towards a collaborative pedagogical model in moocs 2014 04 03 (educon2014) emadrid uam towards a collaborative pedagogical model in moocs Presentation Transcript

    • Towards a Collaborative Pedagogical Model in MOOCs *Iván Claros, **Leovy Echeverría, *Antonio Garmendía, *Ruth Cobos *{ivan.claros, antonio.garmendia, ruth.cobos}@uam.es, ** leovy.echeverria@estudiante.uam.es Department of Computer Science Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Madrid, Spain
    • Outline • Motivation ▫ Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) ▫ Collaborative Learning • Two Collaborative Learning Approaches ▫ Social Media Learning System ▫ Teaching Assistant System • Discussion ▫ Are possible massive collaborative learning experiences? • Conclusion and Future Work
    • What we Know about MOOCs • Massive Open Online Course ▫ Distributed shared space for learning ▫ Large-scale feedback and interaction ▫ Open and Online: free and universal access ▫ But have rules: at the end is a Course • Examples ▫ Coursera (https://www.coursera.org/) ▫ Udacity (http://www.udacity.com/) ▫ edX (https://www.edx.org/) ▫ Miríada X (http://miriadax.net/)
    • What we Know about MOOCs • Stephen Downes (2011) ▫ xMOOCs (Coursera, edX)  Formal (traditional)  Structured  Centralized discussion forum support ▫ cMOOCs (CCK-Style)  Distributed  Chaotic  Learners create and share artefacts  Often blog, forum or personal space
    • What we Know about MOOCs • Multiple services ▫ Centralized: forums, mails ▫ Decentralized: social media (blogs, social networks, …) • Content ▫ Fragmented - distributed resources - Sharing ▫ Format - short video (Multimedia) lectures • Learners ▫ Foster Autonomous, Self-regulated ▫ Peer-learning ▫ Knowledge is generative • Assessments ▫ Quiz, test, creation artefact, peer-commented ▫ Learning analytics
    • What we don’t Know about MOOCs • MOOC requires a flexible pedagogical model based on a high interaction and self-motivation. ▫ The collaborative learning approach seems to be the answer, or at least a starting point.  What happens with a massive collaboration? • Social Media (Web 2.0) ▫ Wikis, Blogs, Microblogs, Videoblogs, and others. ▫ Such platforms allow communication and social interaction  Is this enough for supporting a collaborative learning experience in a MOOC context?
    • Two Collaborative Learning Approaches • Social Media Learning System (Claros & Cobos, 2013) ▫ High support to social interaction processes around the composition of interactive multimedia learning objects. • Teaching Assistant System (Echeverría & Cobos, 2013) ▫ Extends a LMS (Moodle) to support a collaborative instructional model, helping the design of collaborative learning scenarios and assessment processes.
    • Social Media Learning System • Theoretical base ▫ Active Learning (Bonwell and Eison, 1991) ▫ Multimedia Learning (Mayer, 2002) • Services ▫ Social Media environment (Facebook + Youtube) ▫ Tagging ▫ Comments ▫ Rates ▫ Resource Management
    • Social Media Learning System Analysis Synthesis Composition Consume Searching Creating Evaluating Playing Structured Resources And Concepts Shared Database Interactive Multimedia Learning Script Feedback and Interactivity
    • Social Media Learning System • Monitoring Process ▫ Three types of interfaces  Summary: view embedded with basic reports  Exportation : formats such as VNA (for Social Network Analysis), ARFF (for datamining) and CVS (for standard analysis).  Analysis: views embedded with metrics and indicators about collaborative processes. For instances, Sociographs.
    • Summary
    • Exportation
    • Analysis Size: proportional with total of comments Red: in-degree bigger than out-degree Blue: out-degree bigger than in-degree
    • Social Media Learning System • Assessment Process ▫ Traditional Learning outcome assessment complemented by three perspectives:  Individualistic: individual accountability.  Cooperative: contribution to community.  Social Acceptation: peer-assessment measured by interactions derived from his actions.
    • Teaching Assistant System • Theoretical base ▫ A collaborative instructional model based on the Group Investigation method (Sharan & Sharan, 1994) • Four interconnected elements ▫ Topics ▫ Collaborative learning scenarios ▫ Activities ▫ Assessments • Two workspaces ▫ Instructor’s ▫ Student’s
    • Teaching Assistant System • Instructor’s Workspace ▫ The Task Manager ▫ The Assessment Manager ▫ The Report Manager • Student’s workspace ▫ The Assessment Manager ▫ The Report Manager
    • Teaching Assistant System • Monitoring Process ▫ Feedback about the students’ progress in their learning process. ▫ The Report Manager tool embedded in this assistant contains an algorithm that monitors the students’ interactions ▫ Two types of accomplishment rules  Number of activities .  Deadline of activities.
    • Teaching Assistant System • Assessment Process ▫ Two type of assessment: the collaborative learning process and the collaborative learning product assessment. ▫ Assessment criteria in each collaborative learning scenario:  Max/Min grades  Penalty Period.
    • Technological features • Standard Web technologies: HTML5, JS, CSS. • Social Media Learning System ▫ Integration with social networks Facebook and Youtube. REST and Open services. • Teaching Assistant System ▫ Moodle Modules Extensions.
    • Discussion • A collaborative learning activity requires several conditions, for instances: ▫ A common goal (Dillenbourg, 1999) ▫ Positive interdependence (Johnson & Johnson, 1999) ▫ Coordination and Communication (Gutwin & Greenberg, 2004) ▫ Individual accountability (Slavin, 1996) ▫ Awareness (Janssen et. al, 2007)
    • Discussion • Peer-assessment is a scalable assessment strategy, however implicit mechanisms are required, for instance through interaction analysis. • Teachers ▫ Cannot control all the processes ▫ Facilitator in learning processes ▫ He/she needs assistance to facilitate design, monitoring and assessment processes
    • Conclusions • This paper has presented two collaborative learning approaches: the first one supported by social media services, and the second one supported by the LMS Moodle. • This work has presented the main strategies related with the design, assessment and monitoring processes for both approaches. • Both students and teachers require new services. • As future work, the environments that support the proposed approaches would be integrated to MOOCs.
    • References • I. Claros, and R. Cobos, "Social Media Learning: an Approach for Composition of Multimedia Interactive Object in a Collaborative Learning Environment". In Proceedings of the 17th IEEE International Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work in Design (CSCWD 2013), 2013. • L. Echeverría, R. Cobos and M. Morales, Designing and Evaluating Collaborative Learning Scenarios in Moodle LMS Courses. In Cooperative Design, Visualization, and Engineering. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2013, pages 61–66. • Y. Sharan and S. Sharan "Group investigation in the cooperative classroom". In S. Sharan (Ed.) Handbook of Cooperative Learning Methods. Greenwook Press, 1994. • P. Dillenbourg, What do you mean by collaborative learning?. Collaborative-learning: Cognitive and computational approaches, 1999, 1-19. • D. W. Johnson, and R. T. Johnson, An educational psychology success story: Social interdependence theory and cooperative learning. Educational Researcher, 2009, 38(5), 365. • C. Gutwin, and S. Greenberg, The importance of awareness for team cognition in distributed collaboration. In E. Salas & S. M. Fiore (Eds.), Team cognition: Understanding the factors that drive 455 processes and performance, 2004, pp. 177–201. • R. E. Slavin, Research on cooperative learning and achievement: What we know, what we need to know. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 1996, 21(1), pp. 43–69. • J. Janssen, G. Erkens, G. Kanselaar, and J. Jaspers, Visualization of participation: Does it contribute 465 to successful computer-supported collaborative learning? Computers & Education, 2007, 49(4), pp. 1037–1065.
    • Towards a Collaborative Pedagogical Model in MOOCs *Iván Claros, **Leovy Echeverría, *Antonio Garmendía, *Ruth Cobos *{ivan.claros, antonio.garmendia, ruth.cobos}@uam.es, ** leovy.echeverria@estudiante.uam.es Department of Computer Science Universidad Autónoma de Madrid Madrid, Spain