Supporting multiple-administrators-and-markers-in-turnitin

2,101 views

Published on

How to overcome the single-tutor ownership of Turnitin classes when marking a team taught course.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,101
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
684
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Supporting multiple-administrators-and-markers-in-turnitin

  1. 1. Turnitin: Supporting Multiple Administrators & Markers Background Turnitin supports a number of activities relating to assessment: electronic submission; originality checking; and in a growing number of courses, the online marking and feedback distribution of student assignments.  All departments make some use of Turnitin, and over 36 000 assignments have been submitted to the service in each of the last two academic years. There is increasing interest among tutors and markers in both the originality checking and online marking of student assignments.  There is, among the academic departments, a diversity of demands and available resources. Issues Most courses are taught and marked by a team of academic staff members, not just one.  Turnitin has a somewhat rigid approach to access and ownership, and generally supports only one administrator and one Tutor / Marker per course.  This lack of alignment can reduce the effectiveness, or even deter meaningful use, of the service. There are a number of solutions to this problem, but most will add considerably to the administrative burden of the service.  Departments administer and use Turnitin in a variety of ways, and any possible solutions and recommendations have to be appropriate to the resources available to administrators and tutors / markers.  Possible solutions; benefits & challenges  1. Use of Master Classes and Sections  All departments that use the system with the help of their administrative teams have  adopted this hierarchical approach.  The Departmental Administrator creates a Master  Class to which they have access.  Within this area a Section is created. The students  enrol upon this, while a single marker is assigned to it.  This is where the assignments  are created, submitted, viewed and marked.  The advantages of this approach are that this maps closely to traditional and persistent  paper‐based approaches.  In the interests of simplicity, there is only one area for users  to visit.  The Departmental Administrator can view the whole process from creation  through to submission and from there to checking and marking.  2. Shared e­mail addresses  Where there are a number of Administrators supporting a department’s use of the  service, and this is recommended given the importance of assessment, a shared e‐mail  account, e.g. admin@music.rhul.ac.uk is used.  This allows a team approach to  supporting staff and students in a department, especially when many administrators  work part‐time hours.  Please note that in the age of identity management, accessing another user’s account  does contravene RHUL Computer Centre guidelines ‐ http://tiny.cc/rhul‐cc‐guidelines  (See section 2). Martin KingSenior Learning & Technology Officer @ Royal Holloway, University of London13.05.11 page 1 of 5
  2. 2. Turnitin: Supporting Multiple Administrators & Markers  The creation and management of a shared ‘marking account’ is not appropriate for  more than two or three concurrent users as it could cause access issues and confusion  during the time‐critical marking and feedback period.   3. Rotation of Tutors/Markers    1. Create  Master Class 6. Assign  2. Create  different  Section /  tutor to  Assign Tutor Section 5. View files  and  3. Create  Originality  Assignment Reports 4. Submit  files   Key  1‐3, 6: Departmental Administrator    4: Student     5: Marker  An additional  advantage of the Master class / Section model is that it allows the owner  of the Master Class (The Departmental Administrator) to quickly change, at any time,  the owner of the section (the Tutor / Marker).  This allows a controlled yet rapid  response approach to assessment management.    The rotation of markers (Task 6) works well with allowing a non‐concurrent access to  originality reports.  However, this is limited where Turnitin is intended to support a  team‐based approach to marking (through the Grademark tool). Martin KingSenior Learning & Technology Officer @ Royal Holloway, University of London13.05.11 page 2 of 5
  3. 3. Turnitin: Supporting Multiple Administrators & Markers  4. Pre­submission workflow: Creating multiple sections to support team­based  marking   2. Create  1. Create Master  Assignment (with  3. Create Sections Class post‐dates) 5. Inform students  4. Push  6. Submit files of Section IDs and  Assignments to  Passwords Sections 8. Mark and  7. Check for  provide feedback originality (using post‐date)   Key  1‐5: Departmental Administrator    6: Student     7‐8: Marker Notes  a) + Submitted work is ready for checking, marking and feedback as soon as it is submitted  – no further intervention is required by Departmental Administrators.  b) + Creating Assignments in Master Class and then pushing them to Sections is a  streamlined method – a single mouse‐click recreates the Assignment and all its details in  each of the sections.  c) ‐ Students will have to be divided into equal sized groups – one for each marker.  A  Section is then created for each group.  Students will need to know the details for only  their Section.  d) + An additional step (after 8) could involve assigning the course Leader to all the  Sections, or re‐assigning Markers to different Sections for quality control or second  marking.  e) ‐ Second‐markers would be able to see the trail left by the first marker, so this method  would not support double‐blind marking.  The feedback would have to be initialed by  the markers in order to distinguish who wrote it.   Martin KingSenior Learning & Technology Officer @ Royal Holloway, University of London13.05.11 page 3 of 5
  4. 4. Turnitin: Supporting Multiple Administrators & Markers  5. Post­submission workflow: Creating multiple sections to support  team­based marking  Model  1   3. Divide submitted  1. Submit files to  2. One Marker  files into equal sized  Assignment checks for originality groups ‐ one for each  Marker 6. Edit the  5. Create new  4. Download  Assignment details to  Section(s) ‐ one for  submitted files as  NOT check for  each additional  .zip files  to PC or  originality Marker network drive 7. Mark and provide  6. Upload .zip files ‐ feedback one to each Section (using post‐date)   Key  3‐6: Departmental Administrator    1: Student     2, 7 : Marker Notes  f) ‐ Originality checking and Marking become separate activities in this model.  Alternative  outlined in Model 2  g) ‐ Submitted work has to be redistributed by Departmental Administrator before marking  and feedback can begin.  h) + Creating Assignments in Master Class and then pushing them to Sections is a  streamlined method – a single mouse‐click recreates the Assignment and all its details in  each of the sections.  i) + Students submit to a single Section as normal – no need to complicate their enrolment  and submission activities  j) + An additional step (after 7) could involve assigning the course Leader to all the  Sections, or re‐assigning Markers to different Sections for quality control or second  marking.  k) ‐ Second‐markers would be able to see the trail left by the first marker, so this method  would not support double‐blind marking.  The feedback would have to be initialed by  the markers in order to distinguish who wrote it. Martin KingSenior Learning & Technology Officer @ Royal Holloway, University of London13.05.11 page 4 of 5
  5. 5. Turnitin: Supporting Multiple Administrators & Markers  6. Post­submission workflow: Creating multiple sections to support  team­based marking  Model  2   2. Divide submitted  3. Download  1. Submit files to  files into equal sized  submitted files as  Assignment groups ‐ one for each  .zip files  to PC or  Marker network drive 4. Create new  6. Remove 100%  5. Upload .zip files ‐ Section(s) ‐ one for  matches from copy  one to each Section each additional  in  initial sections Marker 7. Mark and provide  feedback (using post‐date)   Key  2‐6: Departmental Administrator    1: Student     7 : Marker Notes  a) ‐ Task 6, the removal of 100% matches can only be performed piecemeal and is  impractical for larger cohorts or where there is greater time pressure.  b) +  The Turnitin2 interface combines originality checking with marking and feedback ,  model 2 takes advantage of this configuration Martin KingSenior Learning & Technology Officer @ Royal Holloway, University of London13.05.11 page 5 of 5

×