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Creating a Literate Environment
Liz Schreiber
Walden University
EDUC 6706:The Beginning Reader PK-3 Dr. Orth
Getting to Know Literacy
Learners
The better you know your students, the better you can
connect them with texts that will ...
Selecting Texts
It is important to choose a balance of linguistic, semiotic,
narrative, and informational texts that are p...
Selecting Texts
 Guided Reading: Students self-selected texts at their level from a unit on
bugs and insects
-Emergent re...
Literacy Lesson: Interactive
Perspective p.1
 Teaching students to learn through an interactive
perspective is an importa...
Literacy Lesson: Interactive
Perspective p.2
LESSON PLAN
Literacy Lesson: Interactive
Perspective p.3
LESSON PLAN
 Teacher: Ms. Elizabeth Schreiber
 Date: August 1, 2013
 Age/G...
Literacy Lesson: Interactive
Perspective p.4
Lesson Foundations
 Pre-assessment (including cognitive and noncognitive mea...
Literacy Lesson: Interactive
Perspective p.5
 Learning Objectives: The students will be able to identify facts they alrea...
Literacy Lesson: Interactive
Perspective p.6
Lesson Sequence
Introduction/Anticipatory Set:
I will begin the lesson by tel...
Literacy Lesson: Interactive
Perspective p.7
Building/Applying Knowledge and Skills:
Next, I will tell the students that t...
Literacy Lesson: Interactive
Perspective p.8
Synthesis/Closure
Finally, I will give each student a “What I Know
Now” hat a...
Literacy Lesson: Interactive
Perspective p.9
Extension/Enrichment/Transfer of Generalization of Knowledge:
After the whole...
Literacy Lesson: Interactive
Perspective p.10
Share reflection of lesson
Questions and comments about lesson
Literacy Lesson: Critical &
Response Perspectives p. 1
 It is imperative that teachers provide opportunities for
their st...
Literacy Lesson: Critical &
Response Perspectives p. 2
LESSON PLAN
Literacy Lesson: Critical &
Response Perspectives p. 3
LESSON PLAN
 Teacher: Ms. Elizabeth Schreiber
 Date: August 6, 20...
Literacy Lesson: Critical &
Response Perspectives p. 4
Lesson Foundations
• Pre-assessment (including cognitive and noncog...
Literacy Lesson: Critical &
Response Perspectives p. 5
 Learning Objectives: The students will learn about what empathy m...
Literacy Lesson: Critical &
Response Perspectives p. 6
Lesson Sequence
Introduction/Anticipatory Set:
I will start off by ...
Literacy Lesson: Critical &
Response Perspectives p. 7
Building/Applying Knowledge and Skills
I will read the students the...
Literacy Lesson: Critical &
Response Perspectives p. 8
Synthesis/Closure
When I finish reading the story, we will do a que...
Literacy Lesson: Critical &
Response Perspectives p. 9
Extension/Enrichment/Transfer of Generalization of Knowledge:
After...
Literacy Lesson: Critical &
Response Perspectives p. 10
Share reflection of lesson
Questions and comments about lesson
References
Carle, E. (1986). The very hungry caterpillar. New York, NY: Philomel Books.
Combining the joy of reading with ...
References p.2
Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010c). Strategic processing. [Video webcast]. Retrieved from
https:/...
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Creating a Literate Environment

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  1. 1. Creating a Literate Environment Liz Schreiber Walden University EDUC 6706:The Beginning Reader PK-3 Dr. Orth
  2. 2. Getting to Know Literacy Learners The better you know your students, the better you can connect them with texts that will impact them in profound ways. –”Getting to Know Your Students” video (Laureate Education Inc., 2010a) Cognitive testing: IRLA: Independent Reading Level Assessment Framework (Hileman & Zorzi Cline, 2012) Non-cognitive testing: Reading interest Survey (Hildebrandt, 2001) Share asssessment results from three students “It is not about what we are teaching but who we are teaching that is most important” –Dr. Janice Almasi(Laureate Education Inc., 2010a)
  3. 3. Selecting Texts It is important to choose a balance of linguistic, semiotic, narrative, and informational texts that are part of the literacy matrix discussed in the video “Analyzing and Selecting Texts” (Laureate Education Inc., 2010b).
  4. 4. Selecting Texts  Guided Reading: Students self-selected texts at their level from a unit on bugs and insects -Emergent reader: Bugs and More Bugs by Trace Taylor and Gina Zorzi (Taylor & Zorzi, 2006) -Beginning reader: Where Do Bugs Live? By Jerald Halpern (Halpern, 1999) -Transitional Reader: Butterfly by Louise Spilsbury (Spilsbury, 2005)  Whole group reading activities -Online book Bug Out! The World’s Creepiest, Crawliest Critters by Ginjer L. Clarke, an informational, semiotic text from “We Give Books” (Combining the joy, 2013) website. -The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle (Carle,1986), narrative story
  5. 5. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective p.1  Teaching students to learn through an interactive perspective is an important job of all teachers. We need our students to learn specific literacy skills, and also learn how to be strategic and metacognitive so that they can control their own learning.  In the video “Strategic Processing”, Dr. Janice Almasi says that strategic processing must be interwoven through all five pillars of literacy instruction (Laureate Education Inc., 2010c), which is something, we, as teachers, need to always keep in mind.
  6. 6. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective p.2 LESSON PLAN
  7. 7. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective p.3 LESSON PLAN  Teacher: Ms. Elizabeth Schreiber  Date: August 1, 2013  Age/Grade Range; Developmental Level(s): Summer reading class of 26 pre-kindergarten through entering second grade students. Special focus on: YR: 4 years old, pre-kindergarten, emergent reader ZZ: 6 years old, entering first grade, beginning reader HT: 6 years old, entering first grade, transitional reader  Anticipated Lesson Duration: 30 minutes
  8. 8. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective p.4 Lesson Foundations  Pre-assessment (including cognitive and noncognitive measures): Prior to this lesson, I assessed all the students using my Independent Reading Level Assessment Framework (Hileman & Zorzi Cline, 2012) as a cognitive assessment to determine what reading level each child is in. I used the “Reading Interest Survey” (Hildebrandt, 2001) as a non-cognitive assessment with these students.  Curricular Focus, Theme, or Subject Area: Bugs and Insects  Stae/District Standards: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.4 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text (Common Core Standards Initiative, 2012). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text(Common Core Standards Initiative, 2012). CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.K.3c Read common high-frequency words by sight (Common Core Standards Initiative, 2012).
  9. 9. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective p.5  Learning Objectives: The students will be able to identify facts they already know about a topic. The students will be able to identify words they do not know in a text and learn what they mean. The students will be able to identify facts they learned about a topic after reading a text. The students will be able to build sight words from a text they read using letter cards.  Adaptations for ELLs, Students with Special Needs, and/or Struggling Readers: I used word cards accompanied with pictures of key words from the text to help my ELL student’s vocabulary development. Also I had my ELL student and my two other emergent readers dictate their answers to me and I recorded them rather than having the students write them themselves.  Perspective(s) addressed in this lesson (Interactive, Critical, and/or Response): Interactive Perspective  Texts: Butterfly by Louise Spilsbury (2005), Where Do Bugs Live? By Jared Halpern (1999), Bugs and More Bugs by Trace Taylor and Gina Zorzi (2006)  Other Materials/Technology/Equipment/Resources: Chart paper, blank paper and pencils for students, class set of “thinking hats”, vocabulary picture cards, letter cards  Grouping structures (one-on-one, small group, whole class): Whole class and small group
  10. 10. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective p.6 Lesson Sequence Introduction/Anticipatory Set: I will begin the lesson by telling the students that we are going to be wearing three different “thinking hats” today while we talk about butterflies. I will explain how there are different ways you can think about a text. I will first pass out the “What I Know” paper hats to the students and have them put them on. I will also give them each a piece of blank paper and instruct them to write down three facts they already know about butterflies as a way to activate their schema. While the rest of the class works on this, I will go around to my ELL student and my two other emergent readers and ask them dictate their answers to me and I will write them on the paper for them. Next, the students will each share their facts with me and I will record them on a piece of chart paper in the “What I Know” column. Any answers that overlap I will put a tally mark by so that each student’s facts are represented. Then, I will give them each a “What I Wonder” hat and ask them to think about if there is anything they wonder about butterflies or would like to learn about them. After I have given them time to think, I will ask them to raise their hand if they would like to share something they wonder about butterflies and I will record their responses on the chart in the “What I Wonder” column.
  11. 11. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective p.7 Building/Applying Knowledge and Skills: Next, I will tell the students that they are going to have their “What I Know” and “What I Wonder” hats ready while I read the book Butterfly (Spilsbury, 2005). I will instruct them to simply put on the appropriate hat each time they hear something we had recorded in the “What I Know” or “What I Wonder” column of our chart. When I see them put on their hats I will acknowledge it and draw a star next to that fact or question on the chart. After I complete the book, we will reflect on which items from our chart we found in the book and which items we did not find. We will talk about where we could find answers to the questions we were not able to answer from this text. Assessment Opportunity: I will informally assess their participation and if they are putting on the appropriate hats at the appropriate times.
  12. 12. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective p.8 Synthesis/Closure Finally, I will give each student a “What I Know Now” hat and have him or her wear it as I read Butterfly (Spilsbury, 2005) a second time. I will tell them that each time they hear a new fact that we had not recorded they should raise their hand. I will also tell them to listen for words that they did not know prior to hearing this book. I will call on students to tell me the new fact or word and I will then record it in the “What I Know Now” column of our chart. Lastly, we will celebrate our new knowledge by giving ourselves a big round of applause. Assessment Opportunity: I will informally assess their listening and comprehension skills.
  13. 13. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective p.9 Extension/Enrichment/Transfer of Generalization of Knowledge: After the whole group lesson, I will meet with my guided reading groups. The students are grouped with other students who are in the same stage of their literacy development and are also in their same level of the 100 Book Challenge (2013) program. I will use the text Bugs and More Bugs by Trace Taylor and Gina Zorzi (2006) with my emergent readers in the 1Y level, Where Do Bugs Live? By Jared Halpern (1999) with my beginning readers in the 2G level, and Butterfly by Louise Spilsbury (2005) with my transitional readers in the 2R level. With each group, I will do a mini-lesson with the “thinking hats” that is similar to the whole group lesson I taught. Instead of recording all of their response on chart paper, it will just be more of a discussion. I will discuss with them in more depth about how activating their prior knowledge makes them better readers. Next, we will use the same texts to do a “Making Words” lesson which is a teacher directed activity where students use letter cards to make words (Tompkins, 2010). In each guided reading group, we will go on a “word hunt” through the books to find power words, or sight words at their independent reading levels and then the students will need to build the words with their letter cards.
  14. 14. Literacy Lesson: Interactive Perspective p.10 Share reflection of lesson Questions and comments about lesson
  15. 15. Literacy Lesson: Critical & Response Perspectives p. 1  It is imperative that teachers provide opportunities for their students to think critically and responsively about texts. In the video “Critical Perspective”, Dr. Janice Almasi says that students need to examine texts from multiple perspectives, critically evaluate text, and judge the accuracy of text in order to be critical thinkers (Laureate Education Inc., 2010d).  Dr. Almasi also says, in the video “Response Perspective”, that we need to give our students time and space to read and reflect on texts that change how they may feel about a particular topic in order to be responsive readers (Laureate Education Inc., 2010e).
  16. 16. Literacy Lesson: Critical & Response Perspectives p. 2 LESSON PLAN
  17. 17. Literacy Lesson: Critical & Response Perspectives p. 3 LESSON PLAN  Teacher: Ms. Elizabeth Schreiber  Date: August 6, 2013  Age/Grade Range; Developmental Level(s): Summer reading class of 26 pre-kindergarten through entering second grade students. Special focus on: YR: 4 years old, pre-kindergarten, emergent reader ZZ: 6 years old, entering first grade, beginning reader HT: 6 years old, entering first grade, transitional reader  Anticipated Lesson Duration: 30 minutes
  18. 18. Literacy Lesson: Critical & Response Perspectives p. 4 Lesson Foundations • Pre-assessment (including cognitive and noncognitive measures): Prior to this lesson, I assessed all the students using my Independent Reading Level Assessment Framework (Hileman & Zorzi Cline, 2012) as a cognitive assessment to determine what reading level each child is in. I used the “Reading Interest Survey” (Hildebrandt, 2001) as a non- cognitive assessment with these students. • Curricular Focus, Theme, or Subject Area: “Back to School” Manners • State/District Standards: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.3 With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.8 With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.10 Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.
  19. 19. Literacy Lesson: Critical & Response Perspectives p. 5  Learning Objectives: The students will learn about what empathy means. The students will think about situations from different perspectives. The students will analyze the reasons why an author writes a text. The students will describe how they would feel if they were in the same scenario as characters from a story. The students will write about how they can help someone who feels a certain way.  Adaptations for ELLs, Students with Special Needs, and/or Struggling Readers: My ELL student and other emergent readers will dictate sentences to me and I will write them on their story paper. They will only have to draw a picture to go with their sentence.  Perspective(s) addressed in this lesson (Interactive, Critical, and/or Response): Critical and Response Perspectives  Texts: Stand in My Shoes: Kids Learning About Empathy By Bob Sornson  Other Materials/Technology/Equipment/Resources: 4 Shoes boxes and shoes, story paper, pencils, crayons  Grouping structures (one-on-one, small group, whole class): Whole class and small group
  20. 20. Literacy Lesson: Critical & Response Perspectives p. 6 Lesson Sequence Introduction/Anticipatory Set: I will start off by asking my students to remind me some of the things we have talked about this week during our theme of “Back to School” manners. I will tell them that today we are going to be talking about empathy and ask if anyone knows what that means. I will tell them that empathy means putting yourself in someone else’s shoes and thinking about how you would feel if you were in someone else’s situation. I will ask the students for any examples of how they have shown empathy before and tell them that we will be reading a story about it. Assessment Opportunities: I will informally assess my students’ responses to determine their background knowledge on this topic.
  21. 21. Literacy Lesson: Critical & Response Perspectives p. 7 Building/Applying Knowledge and Skills I will read the students the book Stand in My Shoes: Kids Learning About Empathy (Sornson, 2013). While I read, we will stop after each scenario and have grand conversations (Tompkins, 2010) about how we would feel if we were in the characters’ in the story’s shoes. Assessment Opportunities: I will informally assess my students’ responses to the scenarios in the story to see if they understand what empathy means.
  22. 22. Literacy Lesson: Critical & Response Perspectives p. 8 Synthesis/Closure When I finish reading the story, we will do a questioning the author (Tompkins, 2010) activity. I will ask the students the following questions:  Why do you think the author wrote this book?  Was he trying to teach us something?  Do you think the author has ever shown empathy before?  Why do you think the author thinks it is important for us to show empathy? Assessment Opportunities: I will informally assess my students’ responses to determine if they are understanding the author’s purpose for writing this story.
  23. 23. Literacy Lesson: Critical & Response Perspectives p. 9 Extension/Enrichment/Transfer of Generalization of Knowledge: After the whole group lesson, I will meet with small groups of five to do a follow up activity. Each group will be comprised of students at the same reading development stage. I will have five shoe boxes with different shoes inside and scenarios written on the lid of each shoe box’s lid. I will ask each student to choose a shoebox and put on the shoes in that box to pretend to be that person wearing those shoes. I will then read aloud the scenarios to my emergent reader and beginning reader groups, but the transitional reader group will have to read the scenario aloud to the group. For example, in one of the boxes is a pair of flip-flops and this is what I wrote on the lid: The girl wearing these shoes was all ready to go to the beach when it started raining outside. How do you think she feels? What could you do or say to make her better? Another box had a pair of boys tennis shoes in them and this is what I wrote on the lid: The boy wearing these shoes wanted to play kick ball outside at recess, but he did not speak much English. He brought the ball to a group of boys and said, “Play ball?” The boys laughed at him and told him they did not want to play with him because he talks funny and has dark skin. How do you think he feels? What could you do or say to make him feel better? Each lid has a different scenario, but the same two questions are on every lid. After each students has had a turn to read their scenario and answer the questions, they will use story paper to write the answers to their questions and draw a picture to go with their sentences. In my emergent group, I will ask the students to dictate their sentences to me and I will write them on their story paper. They will just have to draw the picture. In my beginning group, the students will have to write their sentences, but with guidance and support from me. I will give them a sentence starter and they will need to complete it. In the transitional group the students will have to write their sentences independently. Assessment Opportunity: I will use this student work to formally assess them on their understanding of being empathetic.
  24. 24. Literacy Lesson: Critical & Response Perspectives p. 10 Share reflection of lesson Questions and comments about lesson
  25. 25. References Carle, E. (1986). The very hungry caterpillar. New York, NY: Philomel Books. Combining the joy of reading with the power of helping others. (2013). We Give Books. Retrieved July 16, 2013, from http://www.wegivebooks.org/ Common Core Standards Initiative. (2012). English Language Arts, Reading, Foundational Skills, Grade K. Retrieved from June 28, 2013, from http://www.corestandards.org/ELA-Literacy/RF/K Halpern, J. (1999). Where do bugs live? Austin, TX: Steck Vaughn Company. Hildebrandt, D. (2001). “But there’s nothing good to read” (in the library media center).Media Spectrum: The Journal for Library Media Specialists in Michigan, 28, 34-37 Hileman, J., & Zorzi Cline, G. (2012). Independent reading level assessment framework. American Reading Company. Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010a). Getting to Know Your Students. [Video webcast]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps %2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_2817926_1%26url%3D Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010b). Analyzing and Selecting Texts. [Video webcast]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard %2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_2817926_1%26url%3D
  26. 26. References p.2 Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010c). Strategic processing. [Video webcast]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard %2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_2817926_1%26url%3D Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010d). Critical perspective.. [Video webcast]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps %2Fblackboard%2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_2817926_1%26url%3D Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010e). Response perspective. [Video webcast]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu/webapps/portal/frameset.jsp?tab_tab_group_id=_2_1&url=%2Fwebapps%2Fblackboard %2Fexecute%2Flauncher%3Ftype%3DCourse%26id%3D_2817926_1%26url%3D Sornson, B. (2013) Stand in my shoes: kids learning about empathy. Golden, CO: Love and Logic Press. Spilsbury, L. (2005). Butterfly. Chicago Illinois: Heinemann Library. Taylor, T & Zorzi G. (2006). Bugs and more bugs. King of Prussia, PA: American Reading Company. Tompkins, G.E. (2010). Literacy for the 21st century: a balanced approach (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc.
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