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The Cloud
 

The Cloud

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The definition of "The Cloud" is over used and ill defined....

The definition of "The Cloud" is over used and ill defined.

Allow me to break up this cryptic world of "The Cloud" and give you the digestible low down on what it all means.

Presented at http://schipulcon.com 2011 by Tendenci developer Eloy Zuniga Jr.

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  • DeMystifying the Cloud.\n\nSchipul has been my home for the last five years and I've learned a lot about creating software that people will use, pay for, and more importantly gain value from.\n\nThe definition of "The Cloud" is over used and ill defined. I may be a geek by day, but at night ... ahh who am I kidding.\n\nAllow me to break up this cryptic world of "The Cloud" and give you the digestible low down on what it all means.\n\nI'll illustrate exactly why the cloud came to be and how Schipul is using it to recreate Tendenci less expensive and more powerful than ever.\n\n1. Have a decent conversation about the cloud\n2. Curious about starting your business or what it takes for others to start a business\n3. Big part of your life already and in the future\n\nWhy learn about the cloud?\n1. Start Online Business\n2. Big Part of Our Future\n3. It’s Not Going Away\n
  • 3 Types of services that make up the cloud \nVirtualization is the foundation of the cloud\nThe inevitable future of the cloud and where most hope to take it\n\n\n
  • These 3 models are known as services because you make a request and returns a response. Which is how the entire internet is possible.\n3 Very popular technology models\n\n* Software as a service is the one your probably most familiar with. It’s the one you will have the most interaction with if you’ve ever been a customer.\n* Infrastructure is something a company would work with. Infrastructure is the most standard service you can avoid vendor lockin.\n* Platform is also something a company would work with. Platform is an abstraction of what infrastructure is. It’s the next step.\n
  • These 3 models are known as services because you make a request and returns a response. Which is how the entire internet is possible.\n3 Very popular technology models\n\n* Software as a service is the one your probably most familiar with. It’s the one you will have the most interaction with if you’ve ever been a customer.\n* Infrastructure is something a company would work with. Infrastructure is the most standard service you can avoid vendor lockin.\n* Platform is also something a company would work with. Platform is an abstraction of what infrastructure is. It’s the next step.\n
  • Software as a service came from the limitations found in software.\n\nLimitations.\n\nOperating systems.\nComputer resources.\nGetting software ready for shipment. Lots of tests. Do their best to get the shipment out without bugs.\nFixing one-off bugs is too expensive and most companies can’t afford it.\n\nIn order to gain a competitive edge companies turned to the web.\n\nOperating systems and computer resources were somewhat a thing of the past.\nThings aren’t perfect, but they’re better. We still have to worry about connection speeds and browser limitations.\nBut when compared to the problems of traditional software this was a step in the right direction.\n\nThe bugs that were targeted and fixed are nothing when compared to the beneficial byproducts that came out of this work.\nSoftware monitoring and user-event consolidation became both a new source of insight and revenue.\nSharing data was no longer limited by how big an email you could send, but more over completely based on permissions and who was allows to see what.\nInstead of sharing by sending someone all of your data (e.g. music, photos, movies) it was all about granting permission and allowing them to experience right from the server.\nAccessibility is another wonderful benefit. Until now the idea of getting to your data anywhere was a game of email myself. Which in a bizarro way can be considered the first form of software as a service.\nPrices also got a lot more acceptable. Freeware became more attractive. Charging monthly felt better to both companies and customers.\nSoftware updates are faster than they’ve ever been. We push updates out every week.\nAPI Integration. The idea that your software can communicate with someone else’s software. Something that was never possible with traditional software.\n\nIn short companies are able to provide more, faster, and at a cheaper rate.\n\nThis wonderful new information technology model brought on new pain point called infrastructure.\n\n\n\n\n\n
  • Software as a service came from the limitations found in software.\n\nLimitations.\n\nOperating systems.\nComputer resources.\nGetting software ready for shipment. Lots of tests. Do their best to get the shipment out without bugs.\nFixing one-off bugs is too expensive and most companies can’t afford it.\n\nIn order to gain a competitive edge companies turned to the web.\n\nOperating systems and computer resources were somewhat a thing of the past.\nThings aren’t perfect, but they’re better. We still have to worry about connection speeds and browser limitations.\nBut when compared to the problems of traditional software this was a step in the right direction.\n\nThe bugs that were targeted and fixed are nothing when compared to the beneficial byproducts that came out of this work.\nSoftware monitoring and user-event consolidation became both a new source of insight and revenue.\nSharing data was no longer limited by how big an email you could send, but more over completely based on permissions and who was allows to see what.\nInstead of sharing by sending someone all of your data (e.g. music, photos, movies) it was all about granting permission and allowing them to experience right from the server.\nAccessibility is another wonderful benefit. Until now the idea of getting to your data anywhere was a game of email myself. Which in a bizarro way can be considered the first form of software as a service.\nPrices also got a lot more acceptable. Freeware became more attractive. Charging monthly felt better to both companies and customers.\nSoftware updates are faster than they’ve ever been. We push updates out every week.\nAPI Integration. The idea that your software can communicate with someone else’s software. Something that was never possible with traditional software.\n\nIn short companies are able to provide more, faster, and at a cheaper rate.\n\nThis wonderful new information technology model brought on new pain point called infrastructure.\n\n\n\n\n\n
  • AJAX has played a major part in the delivering of online applications. AJAX allows the traditional styled website to behave more like a native application. It allows a website to behave more like Microsoft Word, Excel, or your favorite photo viewing application.\n\nAsynchronous loading of content first became practical when Java applets were introduced in the first version of the Java language in 1995.\n\n2000 filed a patent on the basic Ajax technology, which was granted in June 2006.[5] In 1999, Microsoft created the XMLHTTP ActiveX control in Internet Explorer 5, which was later adopted by Mozilla, Safari, Opera and other browsers as the XMLHttpRequest JavaScript object.[4][6]\n\nThe utility of background HTTP requests to the server and asynchronous web technologies remained fairly obscure until it started appearing in full scale online applications such as Outlook Web Access (2000)[7] and Oddpost (2002), and later, Google made a wide deployment of Ajax with Gmail (2004) and Google Maps (2005).[8]\n\n\n\nDraw backs\n\nPages dynamically created using successive Ajax requests do not automatically register themselves with the browser's history engine, so clicking the browser's "back" button may not return the browser to an earlier state of the Ajax-enabled page, but may instead return to the last full page visited before it. Workarounds include the use of invisible iframes to trigger changes in the browser's history and changing the URL fragment identifier (the part of a URL after the '#') when Ajax is run and monitoring it for changes.[12][13]\nDynamic web page updates also make it difficult to bookmark and return to a particular state of the application. Solutions to this problem exist, many of which again use the URL fragment identifier.[12][13]\nDepending on the nature of the Ajax application, dynamic page updates may interfere disruptively with user interactions, especially if working on an unstable Internet connection. For instance, editing a search field may trigger a query to the server for search completions, but the user may not know that a search completion popup is forthcoming, and if the internet connection is slow, the popup list may show up at an inconvenient time, when the user has already proceeded to do something else.\nBecause most web crawlers do not execute JavaScript code,[14] publicly indexable web applications should provide an alternative means of accessing the content that would normally be retrieved with Ajax, thereby allowing search engines to index it.\nAny user whose browser does not support JavaScript or XMLHttpRequest, or simply has this functionality disabled, will not be able to properly use pages which depend on Ajax. Devices such as smart phones and PDAs may not have support for the required technologies, though this is decreasingly an issue. The only way to let the user carry out functionality is to fall back to non-JavaScript methods. This can be achieved by making sure links and forms can be resolved properly and do not rely solely on Ajax.[15]\nSimilarly, some web applications which use Ajax are built in a way that cannot be read by screen-reading technologies, such as JAWS. The WAI-ARIA standards provide a way to provide hints in such a case.[16]\n\n
  • Software as a service came from the limitations found in software.\n\nLimitations.\n\nOperating systems.\nComputer resources.\nGetting software ready for shipment. Lots of tests. Do their best to get the shipment out without bugs.\nFixing one-off bugs is too expensive and most companies can’t afford it.\n\nIn order to gain a competitive edge companies turned to the web.\n\nOperating systems and computer resources were somewhat a thing of the past.\nThings aren’t perfect, but they’re better. We still have to worry about connection speeds and browser limitations.\nBut when compared to the problems of traditional software this was a step in the right direction.\n\nThe bugs that were targeted and fixed are nothing when compared to the beneficial byproducts that came out of this work.\nSoftware monitoring and user-event consolidation became both a new source of insight and revenue.\nSharing data was no longer limited by how big an email you could send, but more over completely based on permissions and who was allows to see what.\nInstead of sharing by sending someone all of your data (e.g. music, photos, movies) it was all about granting permission and allowing them to experience right from the server.\nAccessibility is another wonderful benefit. Until now the idea of getting to your data anywhere was a game of email myself. Which in a bizarro way can be considered the first form of software as a service.\nPrices also got a lot more acceptable. Freeware became more attractive. Charging monthly felt better to both companies and customers.\nSoftware updates are faster than they’ve ever been. We push updates out every week.\nAPI Integration. The idea that your software can communicate with someone else’s software. Something that was never possible with traditional software.\n\nIn short companies are able to provide more, faster, and at a cheaper rate.\n\nThis wonderful new information technology model brought on new pain point called infrastructure.\n\n\n\n\n\n
  • These 3 models are known as services because you make a request and returns a response. Which is how the entire internet is possible.\n3 Very popular technology models\n\n* Software as a service is the one your probably most familiar with. It’s the one you will have the most interaction with if you’ve ever been a customer.\n* Infrastructure is something a company would work with. Infrastructure is the most standard service you can avoid vendor lockin.\n* Platform is also something a company would work with. Platform is an abstraction of what infrastructure is. It’s the next step.\n
  • AJAX has played a major part in the delivering of online applications. AJAX allows the traditional styled website to behave more like a native application. It allows a website to behave more like Microsoft Word, Excel, or your favorite photo viewing application.\n\nAsynchronous loading of content first became practical when Java applets were introduced in the first version of the Java language in 1995.\n\n2000 filed a patent on the basic Ajax technology, which was granted in June 2006.[5] In 1999, Microsoft created the XMLHTTP ActiveX control in Internet Explorer 5, which was later adopted by Mozilla, Safari, Opera and other browsers as the XMLHttpRequest JavaScript object.[4][6]\n\nThe utility of background HTTP requests to the server and asynchronous web technologies remained fairly obscure until it started appearing in full scale online applications such as Outlook Web Access (2000)[7] and Oddpost (2002), and later, Google made a wide deployment of Ajax with Gmail (2004) and Google Maps (2005).[8]\n\n
  • AJAX has played a major part in the delivering of online applications. AJAX allows the traditional styled website to behave more like a native application. It allows a website to behave more like Microsoft Word, Excel, or your favorite photo viewing application.\n\nAsynchronous loading of content first became practical when Java applets were introduced in the first version of the Java language in 1995.\n\n2000 filed a patent on the basic Ajax technology, which was granted in June 2006.[5] In 1999, Microsoft created the XMLHTTP ActiveX control in Internet Explorer 5, which was later adopted by Mozilla, Safari, Opera and other browsers as the XMLHttpRequest JavaScript object.[4][6]\n\nThe utility of background HTTP requests to the server and asynchronous web technologies remained fairly obscure until it started appearing in full scale online applications such as Outlook Web Access (2000)[7] and Oddpost (2002), and later, Google made a wide deployment of Ajax with Gmail (2004) and Google Maps (2005).[8]\n\n
  • AJAX has played a major part in the delivering of online applications. AJAX allows the traditional styled website to behave more like a native application. It allows a website to behave more like Microsoft Word, Excel, or your favorite photo viewing application.\n\nAsynchronous loading of content first became practical when Java applets were introduced in the first version of the Java language in 1995.\n\n2000 filed a patent on the basic Ajax technology, which was granted in June 2006.[5] In 1999, Microsoft created the XMLHTTP ActiveX control in Internet Explorer 5, which was later adopted by Mozilla, Safari, Opera and other browsers as the XMLHttpRequest JavaScript object.[4][6]\n\nThe utility of background HTTP requests to the server and asynchronous web technologies remained fairly obscure until it started appearing in full scale online applications such as Outlook Web Access (2000)[7] and Oddpost (2002), and later, Google made a wide deployment of Ajax with Gmail (2004) and Google Maps (2005).[8]\n\n
  • Pay as you go\nAgile server instances (scalability)\nNew pricing model. Charge by the hour.\nAccess to superior IT resources\nDisaster recovery (redundancy)\n\nInfrastructure became a nightmare. Keeping up with software updates, firmware updates, security updates, integration and marshalling, database integration, security, scalability, storage, persistence, state management, application versioning, application instrumentation and developer community facilitatio\n\n
  • AJAX has played a major part in the delivering of online applications. AJAX allows the traditional styled website to behave more like a native application. It allows a website to behave more like Microsoft Word, Excel, or your favorite photo viewing application.\n\nAsynchronous loading of content first became practical when Java applets were introduced in the first version of the Java language in 1995.\n\n2000 filed a patent on the basic Ajax technology, which was granted in June 2006.[5] In 1999, Microsoft created the XMLHTTP ActiveX control in Internet Explorer 5, which was later adopted by Mozilla, Safari, Opera and other browsers as the XMLHttpRequest JavaScript object.[4][6]\n\nThe utility of background HTTP requests to the server and asynchronous web technologies remained fairly obscure until it started appearing in full scale online applications such as Outlook Web Access (2000)[7] and Oddpost (2002), and later, Google made a wide deployment of Ajax with Gmail (2004) and Google Maps (2005).[8]\n\n
  • These 3 models are known as services because you make a request and returns a response. Which is how the entire internet is possible.\n3 Very popular technology models\n\n* Software as a service is the one your probably most familiar with. It’s the one you will have the most interaction with if you’ve ever been a customer.\n* Infrastructure is something a company would work with. Infrastructure is the most standard service you can avoid vendor lockin.\n* Platform is also something a company would work with. Platform is an abstraction of what infrastructure is. It’s the next step.\n
  • Pay as you go\nAgile server instances (scalability)\nNew pricing model. Charge by the hour.\nAccess to superior IT resources\nDisaster recovery (redundancy)\n\nAmazon - March 2006 started\nAmazon - June 2007 330k developers\n\nInfrastructure became a nightmare. Keeping up with software updates, firmware updates, security updates, integration and marshalling, database integration, security, scalability, storage, persistence, state management, application versioning, application instrumentation and developer community facilitatio\n\n
  • Pay as you go\nAgile server instances (scalability)\nNew pricing model. Charge by the hour.\nAccess to superior IT resources\nDisaster recovery (redundancy)\n\nAmazon - March 2006 started\nAmazon - June 2007 330k developers\n\nInfrastructure became a nightmare. Keeping up with software updates, firmware updates, security updates, integration and marshalling, database integration, security, scalability, storage, persistence, state management, application versioning, application instrumentation and developer community facilitatio\n\n
  • Pay as you go\nAgile server instances (scalability)\nNew pricing model. Charge by the hour.\nAccess to superior IT resources\nDisaster recovery (redundancy)\n\nAmazon - March 2006 started\nAmazon - June 2007 330k developers\n\nInfrastructure became a nightmare. Keeping up with software updates, firmware updates, security updates, integration and marshalling, database integration, security, scalability, storage, persistence, state management, application versioning, application instrumentation and developer community facilitatio\n\n
  • \n

The Cloud The Cloud Presentation Transcript