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Youth voices slide presentation for suicide prevention among lgbt youth workshop
 

Youth voices slide presentation for suicide prevention among lgbt youth workshop

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  • This PowerPoint presentation was compiled in 2010 by Effie Malley of the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.
  • Four years before he killed himself, Bobby Griffith wrote this in his diary.Meyer, H. (1995). Minority stress and mental health in gay men. Journal of Health and Social Science Behavior, 36, 38-56.
  • From the Gay, Lesbian, Straight Educators Network (GLSEN) web site.
  • Curtin, M. (2002). Lesbian and bisexual girls in the juvenile justice system. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 19(4), 285-301.
  • Curtin, M. (2002). Lesbian and bisexual girls in the juvenile justice system. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, 19(4), 285-301.
  • Curtin, M. (2002). Lesbian and bisexual girls in the juvenile justice system. Child and Adolescent Social Work Journal, Vol. 19(4), 285-301.
  • Wornoff, R., Estrada, R., & Sommer, S. (2006). Out of the margins. LAMBDA Legal Defense & Education Fund and Child Welfare League of America, report of regional listening forums about youth in care. Available at http://www.cwla.org/pubs/pubdetails.asp?PUBID=10022
  • Woronoff, R., Estrada, R., & Sommer, S. (2006). Out of the margins. LAMBDA Legal Defense & Education Fund and Child Welfare League of America, report of regional listening forums about youth in care. Available at http://www.cwla.org/pubs/pubdetails.asp?PUBID=10022
  • Jennifer M. Meunier, MPH. A qualitative investigation of the contributors to the rate of suicide attempts among youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. Unclear whether she was gay, lesbian, or bisexual.
  • Jennifer M. Meunier, MPH. A qualitative investigation of the contributors to the rate of suicide attempts among youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender.
  • Jennifer M. Meunier, MPH. A qualitative investigation of the contributors to the rate of suicide attempts among youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. Unclear whether youth was gay, bisexual, or transgender.
  • Jennifer M. Meunier, MPH. A qualitative investigation of the contributors to the rate of suicide attempts among youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. Unclear whether youth was gay, bisexual, or transgender.
  • No longer alone: A resource manual for rural sexual minority youth and the adults who serve them. Available at http://www.nyacyouth.org/docs/ruralyouth/NoLongerAlone.pdf , p.8,by Christopher Stapel.
  • Jennifer M. Meunier, MPH. A qualitative investigation of the contributors to the rate of suicide attempts among youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender.
  • Jennifer M. Meunier, MPH. A qualitative investigation of the contributors to the rate of suicide attempts among youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. Unclear whether she was gay, lesbian, or bisexual.
  • Jennifer M. Meunier, MPH. A qualitative investigation of the contributors to the rate of suicide attempts among youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. Unclear whether she was gay, lesbian, or bisexual.
  • No longer alone: A resource manual for rural sexual minority youth and the adults who serve them. Available at http://www.nyacyouth.org/docs/ruralyouth/NoLongerAlone.pdf, p. 8,by Christopher Stapel.
  • Jennifer M. Meunier, MPH. A qualitative investigation of the contributors to the rate of suicide attempts among youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. Unclear whether he was gay, bisexual, or transgender.
  • Jennifer M. Meunier, MPH. A qualitative investigation of the contributors to the rate of suicide attempts among youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. Unclear whether she was gay, lesbian, or bisexual.
  • Everyday Occurrences – An Anthology of Writings by Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual Youth and Their Supporters. Edited by PRISM, the Gay/Straight Alliance at Stoneham High School.
  • No longer alone: A resource manual for rural sexual minority youth and the adults who serve them. Available at http://www.nyacyouth.org/docs/ruralyouth/NoLongerAlone.pdf, p. 8,by Christopher Stapel.
  • Eaton, Susan. (1994/95, Winter). Making school a safe place for gay and lesbian teens. FLEducator. A Washington DC public high school, the first day of school, a 16-year-old student finding the word “faggot” etched on his locker.
  • No longer alone: A resource manual for rural sexual minority youth and the adults who serve them. Available at http://www.nyacyouth.org/docs/ruralyouth/NoLongerAlone.pdf, p. 8,by Christopher Stapel.
  • Eaton, Susan. (1994/95, Winter). Making school a safe place for gay and lesbian teens.FLEducator. In VT, a lesbian teen, not a victim of violence or harassment, dropped out of school.
  • No longer alone: A resource manual for rural sexual minority youth and the adults who serve them. Available at http://www.nyacyouth.org/docs/ruralyouth/NoLongerAlone.pdf, p. 8,by Christopher Stapel.
  • The shared heart: Portraits and stories celebrating lesbian, gay, and bisexual young people. (1997). By Adam Mastoon.
  • The shared heart: Portraits and stories celebrating lesbian, gay, and bisexual young people. (1997). By Adam Mastoon.
  • No longer alone: A resource manual for rural sexual minority youth and the adults who serve them. Available at http://www.nyacyouth.org/docs/ruralyouth/NoLongerAlone.pdf , p. 11,by Christopher Stapel.

Youth voices slide presentation for suicide prevention among lgbt youth workshop Youth voices slide presentation for suicide prevention among lgbt youth workshop Presentation Transcript

  • Bobby Griffith“I can’t let anyone find out that I’m not straight. Itwould be so humiliating. My friends would hateme, I just know it. They might even want to beatme up…I guess I’m no good to anyone…not evenGod. Life is so cruel, and unfair. Sometimes I feellike disappearing from the face of this earth.”
  • a student“I hated school my entire life. Even before Iknew I was gay, I knew I was different andothers picked up on that.”
  • a bisexual girl in thejuvenile justice system“The staff don’t know we are here. They thinkwe are all straight.”
  • a lesbian or bisexual girl inthe juvenile justice system“It ain’t being recognized. Like they can sit upthere and talk about a male and a female butgay and lesbian people ain’t being recognized.”
  • a lesbian girl in thejuvenile justice system[I answered staff] “‘No, I am straight. No, I amstraight. No, no. It is not a problem.’ I was hellamad. After that I was like ‘I really can’t comeout.’”
  • a homeless gay youth ina shelter“Right now I’m in a shelter. I don’t like it becausemost people there are very homophobic. I gotinto a fight just because I’m gay and peopledon’t accept that fact. I’ve been there for threemonths. I’m trying to get the heck out.”
  • a homeless youth“The child welfare system needs a betterunderstanding of what LGBTQ homeless youthexperience on the streets and why they arethere in the first place – like fleeing abusivehomes and not feeling safe in their placements.”
  • a female college student“It’s funny how some people treat youdifferently, even if you’ve been friends with them[since] like the first day freshman year. I actuallyhave people who don’t really talk to meanymore…There’s always that fear factor and it’shard because, a lot of my friends, I want to talk tothem but then like a lot of my heterosexualfriends are like ‘okay, you came out and we don’t
  • a gay male youth“As gay youth, the coming out process, that’s notsomething that’s just going to happen, becauseyou’re going to be gay tomorrow and the next dayand all of a sudden you’re afraid how that’s goingto affect your life…you gotta look forward to whatmight happen…everyday for the rest of your lifeand that can be pretty scary…”
  • a male youth“Then [my mother] hit me with this clincher thatalways gets a lot of kids…‘I thought I’d raisesomeone who would grow up to be someone Icould count on, someone who I could be proud of’…That is one thing that can really lead you tohopelessness, like ‘what good am I, I did not meetthe standards?’”
  • a gay male youth“I mean my family stands behind me 100percent…I’m actually letting out who I am andI’ve become more responsible and respectful ofpeople around me because I’m gay.”
  • a male in Kansas“There’s nothing inherently wrong with you. Itoften takes time to figure out who you are andwhat you want. The important thing is to have aplace or a person you can talk about it with, so itdoesn’t spin incessantly in your head.”
  • a gay student“…basically, our government is saying ‘it’s okay todiscriminate against gays and lesbians’ and I thinkit’s definitely having an effect elsewhere. I mean Ijust had to defend a bill for our Valentine’s Balllast week and two members of college councilabstained from voting on it…because they’reconservative and I’m gay…Why do they thinkthat’s okay? Because our government is doing thesame thing.”
  • a female youth“I know people at school, you know, if they gettaunted and stuff and harassed they just reallyfeel even more overwhelmed that youknow, ‘hey, I have no one to turn to andnowhere to go and people are treating mebad, what’s the point of even being hereanymore?’”
  • a female college student“My mom does five rosaries a day for mebecause gays go to hell. She still loves me butI’m going to go to hell unless I change my ways.”
  • a female in Nebraska“It was very hard to live in a ‘hick’town, surrounded by small-town, small-mindedindividuals and know that something as big aswhat I was feeling inside was just waiting toburst out.”
  • a male youth“I felt less in the eyes of God like I was going tobe judged, and it’s kind of hard when you feellike you have an impending axe above yourhead.”
  • a female college student“It’s not even really just the group itself, I knewthere was a GSA at my middle school…It’s justthe fact that it’s comforting to know that thereeven WAS an organization, that there WEREother people, that people I knew were in it andthat I could talk to them.”
  • JohnWhat if one of them knows?What if they found out?I sit and watch, as everyone mills around,All going about their business.No one gives me a second look…
  • a female in Iowa“Get out. Find a peer group in the next townover until you’re more comfortable withyourself, find teachers/adults you can trust andtalk to.”
  • a gay 16-year-oldstudent“I told some people, just to test it out I guess. Ithought I could trust them. I thought thekeeping it inside…I thought nothing could beworse.”
  • a female in NorthCarolina“Don’t try to tell yourself you are someoneyou’re not because that’s what other peoplewant you to be. It’ll get better, you’ll makefriends that will accept and love you for whoyou are.”
  • a lesbian dropout[I felt] “separate from everyone…alone. It wasthat I couldn’t be me .”
  • a female in Vermont“Do your best and know that you’re not the onlyone…don’t let others drag you down.”
  • 20-year-old Chaya“The loneliness of the closet was sucking all the lifeout of my body…I needed to come out…but wasterrified of losing my family and friends and offacing up to my own homophobia. Then one day,when I was feeling feisty, I gathered all of thecourage I could find (even from my eyelids I think)and began to tell my long-kept secret. I felt sorelieved I no longer had to spend my life in hiding...”
  • 19-year-old Adam“I got way too close to suicide when I was in thecloset. I hated my life. I was tired of lying, and ofbeing afraid…One night, I found myself with aknife in my hand, and I thought, ‘Nothing can hurtmore than this.’…I realized that I could dieanytime, but I could only live once. So I chose tocome out. It was difficult, but I did it. And the painstopped. It was like breathing for the first time.”
  • a male in Texas“I’d really like my community to be more awareof homosexuality because it’s a lot morecommon around here than most realize. I wishthat my teachers would have used gender-neutral language and made GLBT-friendlyliterature available to students.”