Imagining the Internet mobililty shifts keynote
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Imagining the Internet mobililty shifts keynote

on

  • 1,560 views

This Powerpoint was produced by Janna Quitney Anderson, associate professor of communications and director of the Imagining the Internet Center at Elon University.

This Powerpoint was produced by Janna Quitney Anderson, associate professor of communications and director of the Imagining the Internet Center at Elon University.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,560
Views on SlideShare
1,560
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
67
Comments
1

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Hi I’m Janna Anderson from Elon University and I am the director of the Imagining the Internet Center…
  • … WHERE WE WORK TO provide insights into emerging concerns – identifying people ’s hopes and fears and the opportunities and challenges they see arising before us. The center’s research holds a mirror to humanity's use of communications technologies, informs policy development, exposes potential futures and provides a historic record. It strives to illuminate emerging issues in order to serve the greater good.
  • Our first project was a partnership with the Pew Internet Project at the turn of the century to identify the predictions people were making about the potential future of the Internet in the early 1990s.
  • The Early 1990s database includes more than 4,000 predictions by technology stakeholders about the future evolution of communications networks. The experts who were sharing their thoughts 20 years ago were marvelously prescient about key issues such as the difficulties of maintaining a balance between security and privacy and the clashes occurring over the ownership of ideas – free speech, innovation and copyright.
  • The human connections we are building and the information we are databasing on the Internet are creating a shared global intellect that is growing and evolving every day. The future of the Internet is personal, portable, pervasive, and precarious. With the World Wide Web, broadband and 4G mobile connectivity to smart devices, we are entering the earliest phase of a new era, living in an information ocean that flows all around us, delivering what we want … when and where we want it. Among the leading influences creating opportunities and spurring innovation are advances in computing , storage , power , interfaces , materials science , artificial intelligence , and nano and biotechnology . The convergence of breakthroughs in these fields and others is stimulating accelerating waves of change that make it difficult to foresee the future, even over the next five or 10 years.
  • While some are wary, most see technological change as advancing in various positive ways in the near-to-distant future, for instance, individuals have predicted our cars will be able to call repair centers, get instructions and repair themselves; avatars will do our shopping for us; virtual reality will be so much better than real life that some people will choose to live there instead; and “Even the trees will whisper in networks of information.”
  • Since 1993 humanity has built a World Wide Web with more than 70 billion sites and more than 1 trillion addresses.
  • We want to access the information we want, no matter where we are. New ways to encounter and interact with information are allowing Internet-based information to be even more pervasive – available everywhere . Materials science and the shrinking size and cost of energy sources, storage, and computing are making the common adoption of seemingly “futuristic” devices possible now. Information and persuasive communications are becoming embedded in everything we see and hear. We are moving to a world with many seamless choices for gaining access, often without even realizing that a transaction is taking place.
  • Experts we have surveyed tell us our cognitive capacities are shifting. In this world of accelerating change, information literacy is crucial; just-in-time learning and lifelong knowledge acquisition should be the common expectation; we must implement approaches like hybrid learning, the use of telepresence to bring expert resources… and superteachers offering online megaclasses to all; we must encourage the enhanced leverage of collective intelligence in and out of classrooms everywhere. Still remember, though, that connectivity is a blessing and a curse. Technology lifelines can also be technology choke collars. Technology amplifies existing human traits; it doesn’t change human nature.
  • Computer scientists and engineers are working to evolve the Internet so every individual can be a network node with his or her own subnetwork of data and connected devices.
  • As you can see in this data produced in Cisco ’s annual Internet evolution report in the summer of 2010, it is expected that the Internet will be FOUR TIMES LARGER in 2014 than it was in 2009, much of this due to mobile data and video uploads.
  • People are shifting to the use of individually chosen Web-based mobile applications that allow them to live a personalized “always-on” or “hyperconnected” life where the lines between home life and work life disappear and they move in an ambient stream of family and social life and work life with no divisions. Soon most items everywhere will have an Internet address and be networked in what is called the “Internet of Things.” Researchers are now investigating the next long-term possibility: human augmentation with neural implants – allowing us to have a direct brain-to-Internet interface.
  • Mobile access to collective intelligence shared in our knowledge networks is changing how we think, learn and respond to various stimuli. Anthropologist Amber Case has a really great TED video in which she observes that those of us who have mobile connectivity to the Internet are cyborgs – human-computer beings. Hyperconnected people prefer multiple streams of information; they crave multiple inputs; they do not do well with a solo stream – for instance the typical class lecture, unadorned by any interactive elements. The portability of data access has created information proliferation that allows us to follow individuated paths to knowledge from multiple streams. Previous survey respondents have told us that mobile participation must be leveraged for more effective, active, targeted education that is not limited only to traditional schools’ timing or geographical setting. 24/7 access to participation in knowledge acquisition and sharing is nominal. 2010 Future of the Internet survey respondents noted that the growing ability to go frictionless - to communicate with little or no constraints forced by geography, time and space … the possibilities offered by this kind of digital connectivity … are reconfiguring people’s sense of presence and their definition of “reality” and stimulating the encoding of new norms.
  • Everything revolves around human adoption – people ’s uptake of new technology – so the PERSONAL is the third key point of near-future development – About 2 billion people are using the Internet, with the next billion to be connected in the coming decade.
  • Humans are social creatures and they are hunters and gatherers of information – this is hard-wired into us and we will continue to push technology to serve our goals. The figures in the U.S. alone over the past decade show significant gains in multiple uses of the Internet and this trend has been replicated in other developed nations. People are establishing visible global personas online in an open sharing of their professional work, personal photographs, favorite news stories, opinions, likes and dislikes, and all of this visible data is being studied by marketers, advertisers, government entities and others.
  • Respondents to the 2010 Future of the Internet survey said we must cultivate new literacies as the rendering and sharing of knowledge continues to evolve. They noted that the networked society requires individuals to establish personas and consider how reputations are being made, perceived and remade in a new information environment. As we extend ourselves into cyberspace and hyperconnectivity we explore ourselves as much or more than we explore others.
  • With the positives come negatives. The Internet is turning our concepts of work-life balance, property, privacy and identity upside down. Experts we have surveyed say technology often amplifies people ’s existing tendencies, both good and bad. The final point to note is that the future is PRECARIOUS – The Internet of Things is being built, geolocation capabilities are being embedded in every item in the world, and these are becoming part of the overall global intelligence. Everything can be described as data, and data can be mapped, tagged, and tracked. Everything is information; everything is becoming linked data.
  • In this environment… how will the concepts of privacy and identity evolve?
  • So many questions loom for humanity in the digital age… I have a set of DIFFERENT QUESTIONS for us to discuss right now… We’re going to spend the rest of our time here today looking at the EIGHT questions we are asking in the fifth Future of the Internet survey, and we’re opening this discussion up to hear from as many people as possible as we go through each of the question sets.
  • The survey is presented as a series of two-paragraph “TENSION PAIRS” on each issue. We ask our survey respondents to read them and consider them and select the one that is most likely to evolve in the future. While we are interested in your choice of one from each set we are more interested in the reasoning behind your answer, so we ask survey respondents to provide an explanation for each choice – that produces the rich-value predictive data.
  • Open your mind to the possibilities for tomorrow. If it is scientifically possible for humans here on Earth to program intelligence at this nano level, we can extend to say that it is within the realm of possibility that we are surrounded by intelligent life from another civilization right now, perhaps, from another part of the universe. Technology is being embedded in the natural spaces of our lives; it is becoming more personal, portable and pervasive. We are on the verge of even more immersive, life-enhancing networked communications as the sciences of nanotechnology, bioinformatics and our communications networks evolve together. We have to be sharp to stay on top of everything. Accelerating change requires our vigilant attention to the details of connection, so they continue to evolve positively.

Imagining the Internet mobililty shifts keynote Imagining the Internet mobililty shifts keynote Presentation Transcript

  •  
  • http//www.imaginingtheinternet.org
  • Elon University School of Communications The mission: To explore and provide insights into emerging network innovations, global development, dynamics, diffusion and governance. The center ’s research holds a mirror to humanity's use of communications technologies, informs policy development, exposes potential futures and provides a historic record. It strives to illuminate emerging issues in order to serve the greater good. http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/about.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications
      • Imagining the Internet ( www.imaginingtheinternet.org ) - a global-good initiative of Elon University.
      • It all began in 2003 with the construction of a database of 1990-95 predictions about the future potential of the Internet.
      • We expanded from there to do a series of “Future” surveys and gather new predictions regularly from the public and select experts.
  • Elon University School of Communications
    • TMI? (too much info?)
    • Yes, my PowerPoints are dense with details. I will make this available online…
    • Read what you want, all or part…
    • Or just shut your eyes and listen…
    • The point is to share information, so everyone please take in as much as you’d like ! We will have lots of discussion time…
  • Elon University School of Communications http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/early90s/
  • Elon University School of Communications Quotes from Early ‘90s Database There's a big cinder block stuck on the technology accelerator pedal, and we're only gonna go faster and faster, never stopping. - William Gibson, 1994 The value of information about information can be greater than the value of the information itself. - Nicholas Negroponte, 1994
  • Elon University School of Communications The Internet is more like a social space than a thing so that its effects are more like those of Germany than those of hammers. - Mark Poster, 1995 We have to resist media imperialism - the tendency to colonize, to define new technologies in terms of the old ... Redefine, don't repackage. - Barry Diller, 1995
  • Elon University School of Communications From now on, the struggle will not be over mechanical control of the means of information, but over spin-control of the zeitgeist. - Bruce Sterling, 1994 Much care has to be taken with design and education in order for the change to be positive. We don't have natural defenses against fat, sugar, salt, alcohol, alkaloids - or media. - Alan Kay, 1994
  • Elon University School of Communications
    • We have done four “Future of the Internet” surveys… In the 2004 survey we partnered on with Pew Internet…
    • 57% said virtual classes will be prevalent and students will often be grouped with others by virtue of shared interests and needs rather than by age.
    • 56% said as telecommuting and home-schooling expand the boundary between work and leisure will diminish.
    • When we asked what expected changes had not yet materialized, narrative answers showed concerns about the slow progress in schools and the gaps of the digital divide.
    http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2004survey/default.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications Statements from the 2004 survey… Master teachers will copyright courses and lectures , and multimedia versions will become "best sellers.” - Gary Bachula Education will still be in classrooms, however , the nature of knowledge and authority are changing rapidly. - David Weinberger The role of the teacher will change from authority figure with all the information to one-on-one educational coach. - Moira Gunn http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2004_formaleducation.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications The current classroom setup is a byproduct of the assembly line culture of the industrial revolution, with neat rows of desks facing the classroom leader. - Jonathan Peizer Schools are among those institutions most resistant to change… Much of the online learning will continue to be part of the expansion of the role of informal out-of-school learning in students’ lives. - Henry Jenkins Lucky learners will be in communities or professions in which the traditional expectations for judging quality will be liberated. - Christine Geith http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2004_formaleducation.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications
    • (The 2006 survey didn’t zero in on education questions.)
    • In the 2008 Future of the Internet survey…
    • 81% said by 2020 the mobile phone will be the primary connection for most people in the world.
    • 56% said by 2020 virtual worlds, mirror worlds and augmented reality will be popular network formats and most people who are “connected” will be spending time there daily.
    • 57% said by 2020 few lines will divide professional time from personal time and that’s OK – with work and play seamlessly integrated.
    http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2008survey/default.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications It’s possible the mobile phone will be the "babble fish" of the 21st century—the tool that instantly translates any language (human, machine, or otherwise) to any other language. - Ed Dieterle It will no longer be seen as a mobile phone , more as a sort of mobile companion. There will be separate devices that can plug into each other, thus forming new objects on their fusion… to become teaching aids, etc. - Richard Osborne I do not see blanket interconnectivity as necessarily a positive scenario. - Alex Don http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2008survey/mobile_internet_2020.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications If people spend time in artificial spaces/virtual worlds it will likely most often be in game environments. - Steve Jones Sustained life (work/education/socializing) inside the metaverse will happen, but not as quickly as we might expect. Real life's appeals will be stronger. - Adam Peake Virtual worlds are the next evolution in social networking, and once it becomes easier to integrate content from an external environment into the virtual, the development and integration will become as ubiquitous as the Web. - Karmon Runquist http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2008survey/internet_and_virtual_reality_2020.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications
    • In the 2010 Future of the Internet survey…
    • 81% of who were asked, “Is Google making us stupid?” said the Internet is enhancing human intelligence.
    • 72% said by 2020 most Net access will be through mobile devices. (Smartphones, laptops, tablets dominate.)
    • 85% said online relationships will continue to hold and gain in value. (Being “social” and sharing online is +.)
    • 71% said they hope to see more efficient government and business by 2020 because of online opportunities.
    http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2010survey/default.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications The critical uncertainty is whether people will learn the essential literacies: attention, participation, collaboration, crap detection and network awareness… I am not optimistic about the rate of change in education. - Howard Rheingold Current schools’ rules/regulations, job protection , will delay the transformation to a better learning environment. The new learning system, more informal, will eventually win since we must use technology to cause everyone to learn more, more economically. Maintaining the status quo will only continue the existing win/lose society. - Ed Lyell http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2010survey/future_intelligence.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications The challenge we now face comes from the trust the Internet audience puts in the results demonstrated by the major search engines, how we resolve this will be what we most need to focus on in the current and future to ensure that knowledge, that which is primary and authoritative is truly understood and sought. - Kevin Novak Google will make us smarter by freeing humans from the current education system where facts are memorized, history is written by winners and a ‘one size fits all’ policy dominates. In 2020, the sheer amount of data available will fundamentally change our ability to understand. - Davis Fields http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2010survey/future_intelligence.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications The Internet is the future of education, economics, politics, society… - We ARE information. - EVERYTHING is code. - We are becoming one with the Internet.
  • Elon University School of Communications
  • Elon University School of Communications In just a few years we have built a Web with more than 70 billion sites and more than 1 trillion addresses.
  • Elon University School of Communications
    • Search engines…
    • Databases in “the cloud”…
    • Geolocation capabilities…
    • Virtual reality tools…
    • Augmented reality capabilities…
    • Information gamification…
    In just a few years, we created
  • Elon University School of Communications
    • From the 2010 Future of the Internet survey, narrative:
    • Our ever-present ability to tap the Internet and search engines is shifting cognitive capacities – for instance, less memorizing and more need for analytical skills.
    • Our networks increase people’s engagement and the number of ways in which knowledge can be shared.
    • Connectivity is a blessing and a curse; technology lifelines can also be technology choke collars.
    • Technology amplifies existing tendencies; it doesn’t change human nature.
    http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2010survey/default.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications
  • Elon University School of Communications
  • Elon University School of Communications
  • Elon University School of Communications
    • From the 2010 Future of the Internet survey, narrative:
    • Cloud computing will dominate by 2020, allowing easy, instant, individualized access to data from anywhere.
    • Email, social networks and apps and wireless allow people to build communities on the fly and broadcast/share anytime.
    • Constraints of geography, time and space are removed and technology is reconfiguring people’s sense of presence.
    • Frictionless global networks change how reputations are made, perceived and remade and new norms are being encoded.
    http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2010survey/default.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications
  • Elon University School of Communications
  • Elon University School of Communications
    • From the 2010 Future of the Internet survey, narrative:
    • New literacies are necessary as the rendering and sharing of knowledge continues to morph.
    • Mobile devices and social networks have altered expression of identity; are forcing adjustment of norms such as privacy.
    • The change from industrial-era “mass society” to a “networked society” requires individuals to establish personas.
    • Frictionless global networks change how reputations are made, perceived and remade and new norms are being encoded.
    http://www.elon.edu/e-web/predictions/expertsurveys/2010survey/default.xhtml
  • Elon University School of Communications
  • Elon University School of Communications How will the concepts of privacy and identity evolve in this environment?
  • Elon University School of Communications How are our brains changing as we converge with information in cyberspace?
  • Elon University School of Communications Are today ’s human institutions as they are constituted capable of responding well to new opportunities and threats?
  • Elon University School of Communications How is the definition of ‘reality’ changing and how do we tell fact from fiction in a mixed-reality environment?
  • Elon University School of Communications How much will regulation and technology bottlenecks now being introduced interfere with innovation and expected progress?
  • Elon University School of Communications How will differences in access to technology be dealt with in order to avoid a widening knowledge gap?
  • Elon University School of Communications Participate in the next survey! We invite you and your colleagues to participate as expert respondents in the next Future of the Internet survey, which is being fielded right now. To get ideas flowing, we’ll open up to a discussion of the question set right here, right now.
  • Elon University School of Communications Tension pairs force you to weigh options Rather than presenting a straight-on 2020 scenario and asking if you agree we are presenting two paragraphs on each issue and asking you to select which is most likely to evolve – not which you like, but which you most expect, knowing what you know now.
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020 the brains of multitasking youth are “wired” differently from those over age 35 and overall it yields helpful results. They are learning more and they are more adept at finding answers to deep questions, in part because they can search effectively and access collective intelligence via the Internet. The changes in learning behavior and cognition among the young generally produce positive outcomes. Teens, tech and human potential in 2020
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020, the brains of multitasking youth are “wired” differently from those over age 35 and overall it yields baleful results. They do not retain information; they spend most of their energy sharing short social messages, being entertained, and being distracted away from deep engagement. They lack deep-thinking capabilities; they lack face-to-face social skills. The changes in behavior and cognition are generally negative outcomes. Teens, tech and human potential in 2020
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020 the brains of multitasking youth are “wired” differently from those over age 35 and overall it yields helpful results. They are learning more and they are more adept at finding answers to deep questions, in part because they can search effectively and access collective intelligence via the Internet. The changes in learning behavior and cognition among the young generally produce positive outcomes. In 2020, the brains of multitasking youth are “wired” differently from those over age 35 and overall it yields baleful results. They do not retain information; they spend most of their energy sharing short social messages, being entertained, and being distracted away from deep engagement. They lack deep-thinking capabilities; they lack face-to-face social skills. The changes in behavior and cognition are generally negative outcomes. Teens, tech and human potential in 2020
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020, higher ed will not be much different. While people will be accessing more resources through teleconferencing and personal wireless smart devices, most universities will mostly require in-person, on-campus attendance of students most of the time at courses featuring a lot of traditional lectures. Universities’ assessment of learning and their requirements for graduation will be about the same as they are now. Higher education’s destination by 2020
  • Elon University School of Communications By 2020, higher ed will be quite different. There will be mass adoption of teleconferencing and distance learning. Learning activities will move to individualized, just-in-time learning approaches and “hybrid” classes. Most universities’ assessment of learning will take into account more individually-oriented outcomes and capacities that are relevant to subject mastery. Requirements for graduation will be significantly shifted to customized outcomes. Higher education’s destination by 2020
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020, higher ed will not be much different. While people will be accessing more resources through teleconferencing and personal wireless smart devices, most universities will mostly require in-person, on-campus attendance of students most of the time at courses featuring a lot of traditional lectures. Universities’ assessment of learning and their requirements for graduation will be about the same as they are now. By 2020, higher ed will be quite different. There will be mass adoption of teleconferencing and distance learning. Learning activities will move to individualized, just-in-time learning approaches and “hybrid” classes. Most universities’ assessment of learning will take into account more individually-oriented outcomes and capacities that are relevant to subject mastery. Requirements for graduation will be significantly shifted to customized outcomes. Higher education’s destination by 2020
  • Elon University School of Communications By 2020, most people will have embraced and fully adopted the use of smart-device swiping for purchases they make, nearly eliminating the need for cash or credit cards. People will trust and rely on personal hardware and software for handling monetary transactions over the Internet and in stores. Cash and credit cards will have mostly disappeared from many of the transactions that occur in advanced countries. The future of money: What IS your wallet?
  • Elon University School of Communications People will not trust the use of NFC devices and there will not be major conversion of money to an all-digital-all-the-time format. By 2020, it will not have gained a lot of traction. The security implications raise too many concerns. And people are resistant to letting technology companies learn even more about their personal purchasing habits. Cash and credit cards will still be the dominant method of carrying out transactions in advanced countries. The future of money: What IS your wallet?
  • Elon University School of Communications By 2020, most people will have embraced and fully adopted the use of smart-device swiping for purchases they make, nearly eliminating the need for cash or credit cards. People will trust and rely on personal hardware and software for handling monetary transactions over the Internet and in stores. Cash and credit cards will have mostly disappeared from many of the transactions that occur in advanced countries. People will not trust the use of NFC devices and there will not be major conversion of money to an all-digital-all-the-time format. By 2020, it will not have gained a lot of traction. The security implications raise too many concerns. And people are resistant to letting technology companies learn even more about their personal purchasing habits. Cash and credit cards will still be the dominant method of carrying out transactions in advanced countries. The future of money: What IS your wallet?
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020, most people will prefer to use specific apps accessible by Internet connection to accomplish most online work, play, communication, and content creation. Most industry innovation and activity will be devoted to apps development and updates, and use of apps will occupy the majority of technology-users’ time. There will be a widespread belief that the World Wide Web is less important than in the past. Apps vs. Web: Winner?
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020, the open Web continues to thrive and grow as a vibrant place where most people do most of their work, play, communication, and content creation. Apps accessed through iPads, Kindles, Nooks, smartphones, and their progeny – the online tools GigaOM referred to as “the anti-Internet” – will be useful as specialized options. There will be a widespread belief that, compared to apps, the Web is more important and useful. Apps vs. Web: Winner?
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020, most people will prefer to use specific apps accessible by Internet connection to accomplish most online work, play, communication, and content creation. Most industry innovation and activity will be devoted to apps development and updates, and use of apps will occupy the majority of technology-users’ time. There will be a widespread belief that the World Wide Web is less important than in the past. In 2020, the open Web continues to thrive and grow as a vibrant place where most people do most of their work, play, communication, and content creation. Apps accessed through iPads, Kindles, Nooks, smartphones, and their progeny – the online tools GigaOM referred to as “the anti-Internet” – will be useful as specialized options. There will be a widespread belief that, compared to apps, the Web is more important and useful. Apps vs. Web: Winner?
  • Elon University School of Communications The “Internet of Things” and human and machine analysis of large data sets will improve social, political, and economic intelligence by 2020. The rise of what is known as “Big Data” will facilitate “ nowcasting ” (real-time “ forecasting ” ); development of “ inferential software ” ; and the creation of algorithms for advanced correlations that enable new understanding of the world. Overall, the rise of Big Data is a positive. Influence of Big Data, Internet of Things in 2020
  • Elon University School of Communications The “Internet of Things” and human and machine analysis of large data sets will cause more problems than it solves by 2020. The existence of huge data sets for analysis will engender false confidence in our predictive powers and will lead many to make significant and hurtful mistakes. Moreover, analysis of Big Data will be misused by powerful people and institutions with selfish agendas. Overall, the rise of Big Data is a big negative. Influence of Big Data, Internet of Things in 2020
  • Elon University School of Communications The “Internet of Things” and human and machine analysis of large data sets will improve social, political, and economic intelligence by 2020. The rise of what is known as “Big Data” will facilitate “ nowcasting ” (real-time “ forecasting ” ); development of “ inferential software ” ; and the creation of algorithms for advanced correlations that enable new understanding of the world. Overall, the rise of Big Data is a positive. The “Internet of Things” and human and machine analysis of large data sets will cause more problems than it solves by 2020. The existence of huge data sets for analysis will engender false confidence in our predictive powers and will lead many to make significant and hurtful mistakes. Moreover, analysis of Big Data will be misused by powerful people and institutions with selfish agendas. Overall, the rise of Big Data is a big negative. Influence of Big Data, Internet of Things in 2020
  • Elon University School of Communications By 2020, gamification (the use of games, feedback loops, rewards to spur interaction/boost engagement, loyalty, fun and/or learning) will not be implemented in most everyday digital activities for most people. While game use and game-like structures will remain an important segment of the communications scene and will have been adopted in new ways, the gamification of other aspects of communications will not really have advanced much. Getting into the gamification?
  • Elon University School of Communications By 2020, there will have been significant advances in the adoption and use of gamification. It will be making waves on the communications scene and will have been implemented in many new ways for education, health, work, and other aspects of human connection and it will play a role in the everyday activities of many of the people who are actively using communications networks in their daily lives. Getting into the gamification?
  • Elon University School of Communications By 2020, gamification (the use of games, feedback loops, rewards to spur interaction/boost engagement, loyalty, fun and/or learning) will not be implemented in most everyday digital activities for most people. While game use and game-like structures will remain an important segment of the communications scene and will have been adopted in new ways, the gamification of other aspects of communications will not really have advanced much. By 2020, there will have been significant advances in the adoption and use of gamification. It will be making waves on the communications scene and will have been implemented in many new ways for education, health, work, and other aspects of human connection and it will play a role in the everyday activities of many of the people who are actively using communications networks in their daily lives. Getting into the gamification?
  • Elon University School of Communications By 2020, the connected household has become a model of efficiency, as people are able to manage consumption of resources (electricity, water, food, even bandwidth) in ways that place less of a burden on the environment while saving households money. Thanks to what is known as “Smart Systems,” the “Home of the Future” that has often been foretold is coming closer and closer to becoming a reality. The fate of “smart systems”
  • Elon University School of Communications By 2020, most initiatives to embed IP-enabled devices in the home have failed due to difficulties in gaining consumer trust and because of the complexities in using new services. As a result, the home of 2020 looks about the same as the home of 2011 in terms of resource consumption and management. Once again, the “Home of the Future” does not come to resemble the future projected in the recent past. The fate of “smart systems”
  • Elon University School of Communications By 2020, the connected household has become a model of efficiency, as people are able to manage consumption of resources (electricity, water, food, even bandwidth) in ways that place less of a burden on the environment while saving households money. Thanks to what is known as “Smart Systems,” the “Home of the Future” that has often been foretold is coming closer and closer to becoming a reality. By 2020, most initiatives to embed IP-enabled devices in the home have failed due to difficulties in gaining consumer trust and because of the complexities in using new services. As a result, the home of 2020 looks about the same as the home of 2011 in terms of resource consumption and management. Once again, the “Home of the Future” does not come to resemble the future projected in the recent past. The fate of “smart systems”
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020, tech firms with HQs in democratic countries will be expected to abide by a set of norms - for instance, the "Responsibility to Protect” citizens being attacked or challenged by governments. In this world, for instance, a Western telecom firm would not be able to selectively monitor or block the Internet activity of protestors at the behest of an authoritarian government without significant penalties in other markets. Corporate responsibility: Which road will be taken?
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020, technology firms headquartered in democratic countries will have taken steps to minimize their usefulness as tools for political organizing by dissidents. They will reason that too much association with sensitive activities will put them in disfavor with autocratic governments. Indeed, in this world, commercial firms derive significant income from filtering and editing their services on behalf of the world's authoritarian regimes. Corporate responsibility: Which road will be taken?
  • Elon University School of Communications In 2020, tech firms with HQs in democratic countries will be expected to abide by a set of norms - for instance, the "Responsibility to Protect” citizens being attacked or challenged by governments. In this world, for instance, a Western telecom firm would not be able to selectively monitor or block the Internet activity of protestors at the behest of an authoritarian government without significant penalties in other markets. In 2020, technology firms headquartered in democratic countries will have taken steps to minimize their usefulness as tools for political organizing by dissidents. They will reason that too much association with sensitive activities will put them in disfavor with autocratic governments. Indeed, in this world, commercial firms derive significant income from filtering and editing their services on behalf of the world's authoritarian regimes. Corporate responsibility: Which road will be taken?
  • Elon University School of Communications The Pew Internet Project and the Imagining the Internet Center are facilitating regular expert technology conversations about the likely future evolution of the Internet. Due to your active interest in key issues, you are invited to participate. We also strongly encourage the sharing of the survey link with other people in your circles who have some expertise. You will find the survey here:       http://survey.fs.elon.edu/cgi-bin/qwebcorporate.cgi?9JREK7 Pew-Elon Expert Survey Invitation:
  •