Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
BPM Global Trends 2011 - Paul Harmon I
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

BPM Global Trends 2011 - Paul Harmon I

263
views

Published on


0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
263
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Managers and Processes (Título do Slide) I have spent years advocating and consulting on process change I can tell you that nothing really good or lasting happens if senior management doesn’t understand and get behind process work This talk is largely derived from the new book I am working on at the moment This is NOT a book about process redesign or improvement and it isn’t addressed to process change practitioners It’s a book for business executives, about why they ought to be concerned about processes
  • Management and Process Strategies, Value Chains, Customers & Other Stakeholders Measures and Management Understanding Your Processes Managing Processes
  • What is a Process? It describes an activity that consistently and systematically transforms an input into an output In the case of a business process, the output is valuable to someone What it is NOT is just the formal pattern that describes the transformation It’s the actual activity. It needs to be managed. A process is what a process manager manages A process is all the people and the support activities and the decisions that take place in order to produce the valued outputs
  • What is Management? (Título do slide) Most business schools follow Peter Drucker and define management as a collection of tasks or responsibilities One formulation has it that managers: Organize, Plan, Manage, and Control. Most approaches add additional tasks No matter how many tasks they list, what is missing is a central way of understanding how a business functions. The closest most business schools come is when they talk about business strategy Many schools put a lot of emphasis on leadership and on organizational design. If you can just get the right people in the right senior positions, they will make it happen
  • Roger Smith, General Motors, 1987 Interview (Título do Slide) In response to question about why he didn’t just fire the head of GM’s Fisher Body unit for its bad work… Okay, we could do that…but the Fisher manager says, ‘Wait a minute. I did my job. My job was to fabricate a steel door, and I made a steel door, and I shipped it to GMAD.” So you go over to the GMAD guy and say: ‘Listen, one more lousy door and you’re fired.’ He says, ‘Wait a minute, I took what Fisher gave me and the car division’s specs and I put them together, so it’s not my fault.’ So you get to the Chevrolet guy, and you say, ‘One more lousy door, and…’ ‘Wait a minute,’ he says. ‘All I got is what GMAD made.’ So pretty soon you’re back to the Fisher guy, and all you are doing is running around in great big circles.
  • The Focus of Many Traditional Executives (título do slide) The focus is too often on the organization chart and on the goals established for functional units. (O texto abaixo, já estava aqui, e não está no slide). Increasingly company executives say they want to be more process-centric. What do they mean by “process-centric?” At a minimum, they mean they want to focus more attention on the company processes, to emphasize getting things done more efficiently, to improve the way things are done, to assure that processes satisfy customers, etc. It usually also means less emphasis on functional departments and measures and a greater emphasis on process-related measures of performance that cross the boundaries of traditional departments or divisions. It’s an emphasis on seeing how everything works together to produce results that customers value. Cada vez mais os executivos das companhias dizem que querem ser mais centrados em processos. O que eles querem dizer com “centrados em processos”? No mínimo, querem dizer que querem dar mais atenção aos processos da companhia, para enfatizar a realização das coisas com mais eficiencia, para aprimorar a maneira que as coisas são feitas, e assegurar que os processos satisfazem os clientes, etc.. Geralmente isso também significa menor atenção com os departamentos funcionais e medidas e maior ênfase nas medidas de performance dos processos relatados que cruzam as fronteiras dos tradicionais departamentos ou divisões. É uma ênfase em olhar como tudo funciona em armonia para gerar resultados que os clientes valorizam.
  • What’s Missing from the Organization Chart? (Título do Slide) The Customer isn’t shown There’s no clear indication of what the business is trying to accomplish There’s no clear description of what the business needs to do to generate products and services There’s no indication as to how the activities in the different functions might depend upon activities in other functions
  • Management by Functional Departments (Título do Slide) Since the Industrial Revolution, most organizations have divided themselves into functional units, each specializing in doing one job: Marketing, Finance, Fabrication, Assembly, Shipping Business schools have their courses organized around functions: Marketing, Finance, Operations… Which means no one is in a position to see the effort as a whole. No one is a position to assure that all the inputs and outputs of all the activities really add up to the desired final output
  • Management by Functional Departments (Título do Slide) It’s not just that the activities managed by different departments aren’t coordinated… In most cases, the measures organization’s use to determine the effectiveness of functional efforts are not closely tied to the ultimate outputs that are desired Moreover, many senior executives think the way to control departmental failures is to fire and replace departmental executives – assuring that smart departmental executives are going to work hard to meet their departmental goals, no matter how irrelevant those goals are to the ultimate outputs that are desired
  • The Focus of Process-Focused Executives (Título do Slide) The focus is on the creation of value for customers. The focus in on Value Chains that generate value for customers (O texto abaixo, já estava aqui, e não está no slide). Increasingly company executives say they want to be more process-centric. What do they mean by “process-centric?” At a minimum, they mean they want to focus more attention on the company processes, to emphasize getting things done more efficiently, to improve the way things are done, to assure that processes satisfy customers, etc. It usually also means less emphasis on functional departments and measures and a greater emphasis on process-related measures of performance that cross the boundaries of traditional departments or divisions. It’s an emphasis on seeing how everything works together to produce results that customers value. Cada vez mais os executivos das companhias dizem que querem ser mais centrados em processos. O que eles querem dizer com “centrados em processos”? No mínimo, querem dizer que querem dar mais atenção aos processos da companhia, para enfatizar a realização das coisas com mais eficiencia, para aprimorar a maneira que as coisas são feitas, e assegurar que os processos satisfazem os clientes, etc.. Geralmente isso também significa menor atenção com os departamentos funcionais e medidas e maior ênfase nas medidas de performance dos processos relatados que cruzam as fronteiras dos tradicionais departamentos ou divisões. É uma ênfase em olhar como tudo funciona em armonia para gerar resultados que os clientes valorizam.
  • Magement and Process Strategies, Value Chains, Customers & Other Stakeholders Measures and Management Understanding Your Processes Managing Processes
  • A Value Chain (Título do Slide) Defined by Harvard Business School professor Michael Porter in his 1985 book Competitive Strategy A Value Chain is all of the activities that it takes to generate a product or service If you add together the costs of all of the activities it takes to produce a product or service, and then subtract that from the income received for the sale of the product or service, you can determine the profit margin of the firm.
  • A Value Chain: The Largest Processes We Define Within an Organization (Título do Slide)
  • Michael Porter on Competitive Advantage (Título do Slide) Competitive advantage allows a company to dominate its industry for a sustained period of time “ Ultimately, all differences between companies in cost or price derive from the hundreds of activities required to create, produce, sell, and deliver their products or services such as calling on customers, assembling final products, and training employees… “ “ Activities , then, are the basic units of competitive advantage.”
  • Operational Effectiveness and Strategy (Título do Slide) “ Operational effectiveness means performing similar activities better than rival perform them.” “ Few companies have competed successfully on the basis of operational effectiveness over an extended period, and staying ahead of rivals gets harder every day.” “ Strategic positioning means performing different activities from rivals’ or performing similar activities in different ways.” “ While operational effectiveness is about achieving excellence in individual activities, or functions, strategy is about combining activities.”
  • Fit and Competitive Advantage (Título do Slide) “ Competitive advantage grows out of the entire system of activities. The fit among activities substantially reduces cost or increases differentiation.” “ Achieving fit is difficult because it requires the integration of decisions and actions across many independent subunits.” “ Positions build on systems of activities are far more sustainable than those build on individual activities.” Michael E. Porter. “What is Strategy?” HBR, Nov-Dec 1996. (Available on amazon.com )
  • An Organization with One Value Chain (Título do Slide) In organizations with only one value, divisions are less clear
  • An Organization with Two Value Chains (Título do Slide)
  • Corporate Management vs. Value Chain Management (Título do Slide) As a broad generalization… Corporate management is concerned with capital, with acquiring it and generating a return on it. They may have general visions, and express strategic intents, and the often promote specific programs (e.g. Reduce costs, Shift to a new technology), but… It’s the value chain managers who should be concerned with developing a specific business model and a strategy for achieving the goals of the value chain I suspect this is just as true with government and non-profit organizations, although they talk about it a bit differently
  • So How Do You Define a Value Chain? (Título do Slide) Do not define a value chain in terms of its product or services And do not assume your current business units equal value chains Define a value chain in terms of the customer value proposition it addresses A customer value proposition defines a problem or a need that customers have and that they are willing to spend money to solve.
  • Customer Value Propositions (Título do Slide) The value chain produces a product/service Customers have value propositions – which define problems or needs they hope to solve by acquiring a product/service Customers choose between products/services based on how well they believe a product/service will help them deal with their problem Markets are groups of customers that share a similar customer value proposition
  • IBM in 1993 (Título do Slide) IBM was in trouble in 1993 – sales of mainframes, its major source of income – was dropping fast IBM hired Louis Gerstner as its new CEO and he set out to determine what IBM’s Customer Value Proposition was Critics urged Gerstner to break IBM up into separate companies that sold mainframes, software, and consulting services Gerstner determined that what customers wanted was a single organization that could handle all their computing problems. They didn’t want to deal with multiple companies Gerstner kept IBM together because he decide that the Customer Value Proposition was: Provide integrated computing capability
  • A Value Chain Should be Tightly Integrated (Título do Slide) Each activity should add value to the next activity in a value chain If it doesn’t, consider that you have more than one value chain In 1989 Robert Horton became CEO of British Petroleum (now simply called BP) He wanted to identify his value chains. Everyone told him BP had one: Deliver Refined Petroleum products, which was subdivided into 3 major subprocesses: Upstream Production, Midstream Transport, and Downstream Refining Horton challenged this assumption
  • Are the Processes Tightly Integrated? (Título do Slide)
  • Implementations of Value Steams (Título do Slide) The same value stream can be implemented in multiple places BP’s Upstream Value Chain, was an oil field with a lifecycle: It was brought online, produced, and then was retired Horton quickly realized that he wanted a process manager for each oil field, and wanted data on how each did, independent of the other fields And then he set about identifying the best practices so he could improve what was done
  • Three Possible Bank Value Chains (Título do Slide)
  • One Value Chain With One Value Proposition (Título do slide) What is the Value Proposition: Provide financial services. The goal: That each customer have 5 different services from the bank. Better to start with a single value chain and then introduce variations as necessary. It avoids the problem of having lots of activities that are essentially similar with different names
  • Why Is the Value Chain so Important? (Título do slide) Because the only way you can tell if something needs to be done, or is being done right is by determining if it adds to the value your organization is set up to create
  • Process Gives Meaning to All the Other Perspectives (Título do Slide) (O texto abaixo, já estava aqui, e não está no slide). The big difference is between people who name a process and then look inside, vs those who name a process and then look at how it relates to its environment. A grande diferença está entre as pessoas que nomeam um processo e depois olham para ele, contra aqueles que nomeam o processo e depois olham para como ele impacta no ambiente.
  • Balanced Scorecards, Measures, and Management Performance Reviews (Título do Slide) Most organizations do scorecards for departments
  • Some Organizations Have Scorecards for Departments and for Processes (Título do slide)
  • Process Managers Have Two Sets of Metrics if They Report to Two Managers (Título do Slide)
  • A Modified Scorecard Can be Use to Collect Measures (Título do Slide)
  • The Top Level Scorecards Are Populated by Values Propositions from Each Stakeholder Interaction (Título do Slide) Different value streams and stakeholders generate different process metrics to monitor
  • Scorecards Need to Be Aligned with Processes (Título do Slide)
  • Accounting for Costs (Título do Slide) Most accounting is still focused on departmental efforts Great article in Sept 2011 Harvard Business Review on “How to Solve the Cost Crisis in Health Care” by Robert Kaplan and Michael Porter of HBS. They argue that hospitals need to look at processes that result in value for customers, and then determine the costs that go into producing those results. Moreover they argue that the real cost is the total lifecycle cost per patient per health problem. This article is just one example of the renewed interest in Activity-Based Costing – and particularly in the new version: Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing See Time Driven activity Based Costing by R.S. Kaplan and R. Cooper. HBR Press, 2007
  • Costing the Process (Título do Slide) Trying to figure out how a company is doing using traditional financial accounting measures is very difficult You need to know what is costs to perform an instance of a process. And you need to know how successful each performance is. With those numbers you can begin to get serious about reducing the costs of processes while maintaining the quality of service Alternatives, like cutting 10% across the board, just degrades service and gives you a temporary and unsustainable reduction in costs
  • Management and Process Strategies, Value Chains, Customers & Other Stakeholders Measures and Management Understanding Your Processes Managing Processes
  • What the CEO Manages (Título do slide) The CEO manages the overall direction of the company and its capital He or she also manages the value chains (Hopefully via value chain managers who are held responsible for achieving value chain goals) Most large organizations are, in fact, operating with a portfolio strategy, betting more on value chains that get good results (ROI) and eliminating those that don’t Jack Welch at GE famously decided that every GE “company” had to be the best, or second best, in its industry, or he sold it off
  • What the Value Chain Manager Manages (Título do Slide) The Value Chain Manager assures that the value chain is delivering value to customers and getting a reasonable return on its use of capital Each Value Chain should be based on a Business Model which, in essence, states: This value chain exists to satisfy X need for Y customers It does this by creating a unit, M, for N cost It sells M for P price, and makes a profit of P-N per unit Investment in technology, expansion, etc. all depend on this basic formula
  • Types of Organizational Structure (Título do slide) (O texto abaixo, já estava aqui, e não está no slide). This is a chart from the Process Management Institute. It emphasizes that a company can be classified as to how much emphasis they put on functions vs. processes. There are different criteria to suggest where specific organizations lie – whether the functional or the process managers control resources, for example. Este é um gráfico de um Instituto de Gerenciamento de Processo. Ele enfatiza qua a companhia pode ser classificada como quanta enfase eles dão a funções vs. processos. Existe um critério diferente que sugere onde organizações específicas mentem – se é o funcional ou o gerente de processos que controla os recursos, por exemplo.
  • Managing a Value Chain Process (Título do slide)
  • Wearing Two Management Hats (Título do Slide) Lots of organizations have functional managers who also serve as process managers In some companies a Line of Business manager is very similar to a Value Chain Manager and the same person can fill both roles In smaller organizations with only one value chain the COO also serves as the Value Chain manager Wearing two hats always creates conflicts. It’s more popular in weak matrix organizations than in strong matrix organizations Few organizations have more than two layers of process managers – in effect, Value Chain Managers and Level 1 Process Managers
  • Process Management (Título do Slide) However you arrange it, you have to manage each value chain and each major value stream or subprocess Someone has to be responsible for seeing that the whole value chain or steam works together to generate the desired outcome This isn’t something that a functional manager can do Functional managers always want to suboptimize – they do things for their department at the expense of the value chain, as a whole For most companies process management isn’t something existing managers are trained to do -- you need to create, train them to focus on whole processes, set clear goals and establish bonuses, and then support them
  • Using Processes Depends on Knowing Your Processes (Título do slide) There are lots of different ways to talk about processes If you are going to focus on Process Management, you need a broad agreement on what value chains your organization has and what value streams make up those value chains You need a Business Process Architecture This IS NOT something you should entrust to your IT group. This is something the chief executives of the organization need to create
  • A Good Business Process Architecture Includes (Título do Slide) A model of your organization’s value chains and value streams processes – a knowledge of how things flow to obtain desired results A description of the policies/business rules used to make key decisions in each value chain or stream A description of the values being produced, and clear Key Performance Indicators (KPIs or Metrics) to use to measure the results Constant measurement Process managers responsible for obtaining the specific KPIs associated with each value chain or stream
  • Value Chain of a National Oil Company (Título do Slide) This architecture was developed by the executive committee of the company specifically to assign management roles
  • Boeing GMS Identified 300+ Processes (Título do slide)
  • Value Chains Support High Level Analysis (Título do Slide) Consider this financial data about a value chain as recorded on the financial statement of the company (in millions) Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6 Revenues 12.1 37.3 70.5 98.3 116.9 170.7 Oper. Exp. 12.4 35.3 63.9 88.5 106.7 157.7 Revenue/$1 Dollar of Oper. Exp. 0.98 1.06 1.10 1.11 1.10 1.08 Note that if you were a non-profit, you could consider the cost of successfully completed client/interactions rather than revenue
  • Restated Graphically: Productivity is Declining (Título do slide) Why is productivity declining?
  • Process Gives Meaning to All the Other Perspectives (Título do Slide)
  • Transcript

    • 1. Seminário, Brasil, Outubro de 2011. ManhãGestores e ProcessosPaul HarmonEditor Executivo, www.bptrends.comChefe de Metodologia, BPTrends AssociatesAutor: Business Process Change ©2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved
    • 2. Gestores e Processos• Passei anos atuando em favor e prestando consultoria sobre mudança de processos• Posso afirmar que nada muito bom ou duradouro acontece se a alta direção não entende e não está por trás do trabalho de processos.• Esta discussão é derivada do novo livro em que estou trabalhando no momento• Este NÃO é um livro sobre redesenho ou melhoria de processos e não está direcionado aos praticantes de mudanças em processos• É um livro para executivos de negócio, que fala sobre porque eles deveriam se preocupar com processos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 2
    • 3. Maturidade de Processos e Comprometimento daAlta Direção Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved.
    • 4. Agenda• Gestão e Processos• Estratégias, Cadeias de Valor, Clientes e Outros Stakeholders• Medidas e Gestão• Gerenciando Processos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 4
    • 5. O que é um Processo?• Ele descreve uma atividade que, de forma constante e sistemática, transforma um insumo em um resultado• No caso de um processo de negócio, o resultado é valioso para alguém• Ele NÃO é apenas o padrão formal que descreve a transformação• É a atividade em si. Precisa ser gerido.• Um processo é o que um gestor de processos gerencia• Processos são todas as pessoas, atividades de suporte e decisões que atuam com a finalidade de produzir resultados valiosos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 5
    • 6. O que é Gestão?• A maioria das escolas de negócio segue Peter Drucker e define gestão como uma coleção de tarefas ou responsabilidades• Existe uma formulação de que os gestores: Organizam, Planejam, Gerenciam e Controlam.• A maioria das abordagens acrescenta tarefas adicionais• Não importa quantas tarefas eles listem, o que está faltando é uma maneira central de entender como o negócio funciona• Muitas escolas dão bastante ênfase na liderança e no projeto organizacional. Se você puder apenas colocar as pessoas certas nas posições sênior certas, eles farão que isso aconteça Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 6
    • 7. Entrevista de Roger Smith, General Motors,1987• Em resposta à questão feita sobre por que ele não demitiu o gerente da unidade Fischer Body da GM por mau trabalho… OK, nós poderíamos ter feito isso… mas o gerente da Fischer diz, ‘espere um minuto. Eu fiz meu trabalho. Meu trabalho era fabricar uma porta de ferro, e fiz uma porta de ferro, e enviei para GMAD.” Então você vai até o rapaz da GMAD e diz: ’Escute, mais uma porta nojenta e você será demitido’. Ele diz, ‘Espere um minuto, eu peguei o que Fischer me deu e a ficha de divisão do carro e os juntei, então não é minha culpa.’ Então você vai até o rapaz da Chevrolet e diz, ‘mais uma porta péssima, e…’ ‘Espere um minuto,’ ele diz. ‘Tudo que recebi foi o que a GMAD fez.’ Então rapidamente você está de volta ao rapaz da Fischer, a tudo que está fazendo é dar voltas em grandes círculos. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 7
    • 8. O Foco de Muitos Executivos TradicionaisO foco é muito frequente no organograma e nas metasestabelecidas para as unidades funcionais. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 8
    • 9. O que Está Faltando no Organograma?• O Cliente não aparece• Não há uma indicação clara do que o negócio está tentando realizar• Não há uma descrição clara do que o negócio precisa para gerar produtos e serviços• Não há uma indicação de como as atividades em suas diferentes funções dependem de atividades em outras funções Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 9
    • 10. Gestão por Departamentos Funcionais• Desde a Revolução Industrial, muitas organizações se dividem em unidades funcionais, cada especialização faz o seu trabalho: Marketing, Finanças, Produção, Montagem, Expedição• Escolas de Negócio têm seus cursos baseados nas funções: Marketing, Finanças, Operações…• O que significa que ninguém vê o esforço como um todo. Ninguém está em uma posição de afirmar que todas as entradas e saídas de todas as atividades contribuem para o resultado final desejado Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 10
    • 11. Gestão por Departamentos Funcionais• Não se trata apenas de dizer que as atividades gerenciadas por diferentes departamentos não são coordenadas…• Na maioria dos casos, as métricas usadas pelas empresas para determinar a eficácia dos esforços funcionais não estão bem amarradas aos resultados finais desejados• Além disso, muitos executivos sênior pensam que a maneira de controlar as falhas departamentais é demitir e substituir os executivos dos departamentos – assegurando que executivos inteligentes de departamentos trabalharão muito para cumprir suas metas, independentemente de quão irrelevante essas metas sejam para o resultado final desejado Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 11
    • 12. O Foco dos Executivos Focados em Processos• O foco é na criação de valor para os clientes.• O foco é em Cadeias de Valor que geram valor paraclientes. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 12
    • 13. Agenda• Gestão e Processos• Estratégia, Cadeia de Valor, Clientes e Outros Stakeholders• Medidas e Gestão• Gerenciando Processos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 13
    • 14. Uma Cadeia de Valor• Definida pelo professor Michael Porter da Escola de Negócios de Harvard no livro Estratégia Competitiva em 1985• Uma Cadeia de Valor é o conjunto de atividades necessárias para gerar um produto ou serviço• Se você somar os custos de toda atividade necessária para produzir um produto ou serviço, e, em seguida, subtrair isso da receita recebida pela venda do produto ou serviço, você pode determinar a margem de lucro da empresa. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 14
    • 15. Uma Cadeia de Valor: Os Maiores Processos que NósDefinimos em uma Organização Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 15
    • 16. Michael Porter e a Vantagem Competitiva• Vantagem Competitiva permite que uma organização domine sua indústria por um período de tempo contínuo• “Em última análise, todas as diferenças de custo ou preço entre organizações são derivadas das centenas de atividades necessárias para criar, produzir, vender e entregar seus produtos ou serviços, tais como visitas a clientes, montagem dos produtos finais, e treinamento dos funcionários… “• “Atividades, então, são os componentes básicos da vantagem competitiva.” Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 16
    • 17. Excelência Operacional e Estratégia• “Excelência Operacional significa realizar atividades similares melhor do que seus concorrentes realizam as deles.”• “Poucas organizações competiram por um longo período, com sucesso, baseadas na excelência operacional, e se manter na frente dos concorrentes fica mais difícil a cada dia.”• “Posicionamento Estratégico significa realizar atividades diferentes das dos concorrentes, ou realizar atividades similares de diferentes maneiras.”• “Enquanto a excelência operacional procura alcançar a excelência nas atividades individuais, ou funções, a estratégia procura combinar atividades.” Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 17
    • 18. Ajuste e Vantagem Competitiva• “A Vantagem Competitiva nasce de todo o sistema das atividades. O ajuste entre as atividades reduz substancialmente o custo ou aumenta a diferenciação”.• “Alcançar o ajuste é difícil porque requer a integração das decisões e ações através de várias subunidades”.• “Posições desenvolvidas em sistemas de atividades são muito mais sustentáveis do que aquelas desenvolvidas em atividades individuais.” Michael E. Porter. “What is Strategy?” HBR, Nov-Dec 1996. (Disponível em amazon.com) Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 18
    • 19. Uma Organização com Uma Cadeia de ValorEm organizações com apenas uma cadeia de valor, as divisõessão menos claras Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 19
    • 20. Uma Organização com Duas Cadeias de Valor Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 20
    • 21. Gestão Corporativa vs. Gestão da Cadeia de Valor• Em uma ampla generalização…• Gestores Corporativos se preocupam com o capital, em como adquiri-lo e como gerar retorno sobre ele. Podem ter visão geral e expressar os propósitos estratégicos, e, frequentemente, promover programas específicos (por exemplo: reduzir custos, mudar para uma nova tecnologia), mas…• São os gestores da cadeia de valor que deveriam se preocupar em desenvolver um modelo de negócio específico e uma estratégia para alcançar as metas da cadeia de valor.• Eu suspeito que isso seja uma verdade também para organizações governamentais e sem fins lucrativos, apesar de falarem sobre isso de forma um pouco diferente. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 21
    • 22. Então, Como se Define uma Cadeia de Valor?• Não defina a cadeia de valor com base em seus produtos ou serviços• E não assuma suas unidades de negócio atuais iguais a cadeias de valor• Defina a cadeia de valor com base na abordagem de proposição de valor a um cliente• A proposição de valor ao cliente define um problema ou uma necessidade que os clientes têm e que eles estão dispostos a gastar dinheiro para resolver. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 22
    • 23. Proposições de Valor ao Cliente• A cadeia de valor produz um produto ou serviço• Os Clientes têm proposições de valor – que definem problemas ou necessidades que eles esperam resolver através da compra de um produto ou serviço.• Os Clientes escolhem entre produtos/serviços baseados na crença de como o produto/serviço irá ajuda-los a resolver seus problemas da melhor maneira.• Mercados são grupos de clientes que compartilham uma proposição de valor similar. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 23
    • 24. IBM em 1993• A IBM estava com problemas em 1993 - as vendas de mainframes, sua principal fonte de renda – estava caindo• A IBM contratou Louis Gerstner como seu novo CEO e ele começou a determinar qual era a Proposição da Cadeia de Valor ao Cliente da IBM• Críticos pediram para Gerstner separar a IBM em companhias separadas para venda de mainframes, softwares, e serviços de consultoria• Gerstner determinou que o que os clientes queriam era uma única organização que poderia lidar com todos seus problemas com computação. Eles não queriam negociar com várias companhias• Gerstner manteve a IBM junta porque decidiu que a Proposição de Valor do Cliente era: Fornecer capacidade computacional integrada Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 24
    • 25. Uma Cadeia de Valor Deve Estar FirmementeIntegrada• Cada atividade deve agregar valor para a próxima atividade em uma cadeia de valor• Se não, considere que você tem mais de uma cadeia de valor• Em 1989 Robert Horton se tornou CEO da British Petroleum (agora, simplesmente chamada BP)• Ele queria identificar suas cadeias de valor. Todos disseram a ele que a BP tinha uma: Entregar produtos de petróleo refinado, que era subdividida em 3 principais subprocessos: Produção Upstream, Transporte Midstream e Refino Downstream.• Horton desafiou essa premissa Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 25
    • 26. Os Processos Estão Firmemente Integrados? Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 26
    • 27. Implementações do Fluxo de Valor• O mesmo fluxo de valor pode ser implementado em diversos lugares• A Cadeia de Valor de Upstream da BP era um campo de petróleo com um ciclo de vida: foi colocado em produção, produziu e então foi descontinuado• Horton realizou rapidamente o que queria, um gestor de processos para cada campo de petróleo, e queria dados sobre como cada um fez, independentemente dos outros campos• E então ele começou a identificar as melhores práticas, assim poderia aprimorar o que foi feito Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 27
    • 28. Três Possíveis Cadeias de Valor de um Banco Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 28
    • 29. Uma Cadeia de Valor com Uma Proposição deValor• Qual é a proposição de valor: Fornecer serviços financeiros. A meta: que cada cliente tenha 5 serviços diferentes do banco.• Melhor começar com uma única cadeia de valor e então introduzir as variações quando necessário. Isso evita o problema de se ter várias atividades que são essencialmente similares com nomes diferentes Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 29
    • 30. Por que a Cadeia de Valor é Tão Importante?• Porque a única maneira de falarmos se algo precisa ser feito, ou está sendo feito corretamente, é determinando se isso agrega para organização o valor que se propõe a criar Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 30
    • 31. Os Processos Dão Significado a Todas as OutrasPerspectivas Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 31
    • 32. Agenda• Gestão e Processos• Estratégias, Cadeias de Valor, Clientes e Outros Stakeholders• Medidas e Gestão• Gerenciando Processos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 32
    • 33. Balanced Scorecards, Medidas e Revisão da Gestão dePerformance Muitas organizações usam scorecards para departamentos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 33
    • 34. Algumas Organizações Têm Scorecards para osDepartamentos e para os Processos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 34
    • 35. Gestores de Processos têm dois conjuntos de métricasse eles se reportarem para dois gerentes Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 35
    • 36. Um Scorecard Modificado Pode Ser Usado Para ColetarMedidas Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 36
    • 37. Níveis Superiores dos Scorecards são Preenchidos com asProposições de Valor da cada Interação com Stakeholder• Diferentes fluxos de valor e stakeholders geram diferentes métricas de processos para monitorar Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 37
    • 38. Scorecards Precisam estar Alinhados com osProcessos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 38
    • 39. Contabilização de Custos• Muitas contabilidades ainda estão focadas nos esforços departamentais• Há um excelente artigo da Harvard Business Review sobre “Como Solucionar a Crise de Custos Na Saúde” em Setembro de 2011, por Robert Kaplan e Michael Porter.• Eles argumentam que os hospitais precisam olhar para os processos que resultam em valor para os clientes, e então determinar os custos necessários para gerar esses resultados. Além disso, argumentam que o custo real é o custo do ciclo de vida total por paciente por problema de saúde.• Esse artigo é apenas um exemplo do interesse renovado no Custeio Baseado em Atividades – e, particularmente, na nova versão: Custeio Baseado em Atividades Direcionado pelo Tempo• Veja Time-Driven activity Based Costing por R.S. Kaplan e R. Cooper. HBR Press, 2007 Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 39
    • 40. Calculando o Custo de um Processo• Tentar descobrir como uma organização está a partir das medidas da contabilidade financeira tradicional é muito difícil• Você precisa saber quais são custos para executar uma instância de um processo. E você precisa saber o quão bem sucedida é cada execução.• Com esses números, você pode começar a levar a sério a redução de custos dos processos enquanto mantém a qualidade do serviço.• Alternativas como o corte de 10% em toda a linha apenas degradam o serviço e resultam na redução temporária e insustentável dos custos. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 40
    • 41. Agenda• Gestão e Processos• Estratégias, Cadeias de Valor, Clientes e Outros Stakeholders• Medidas e Gestão• Gerenciando Processos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 41
    • 42. O Que o Presidente (CEO) Gerencia• O Presidente gerencia a direção geral da organização e seu capital• Ele ou Ela também gerencia as Cadeias de Valor (Esperamos que por meio de gestores de cadeias de valor, responsáveis por atingir as metas das cadeias de valor)• Muitas das grandes organizações estão, de fato, operando com uma estratégia de portfólio, apostando mais em cadeias de valor que geram bons resultados (ROI) e eliminando aquelas que não.• Jack Welch na GE popularmente decidiu que cada “companhia” da GE tinha que ser a melhor, ou segunda melhor, em sua indústria, senão ele a venderia. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 42
    • 43. O Que o Gestor da Cadeia de Valor Gerencia• O Gestor da Cadeia de Valor garante que a cadeia de valor está agregando valor aos clientes e gerando um retorno razoável no seu uso do capital.• Cada Cadeia de Valor deve estar baseada em um modelo de negócio no qual, em essência, afirma: – Essa cadeia de valor existe para satisfazer X necessidades de Y clientes. – Isso acontece através da criação de uma unidade, M, ao custo N. – Ela vende M, por um preço P, e fazer um lucro de P- N por unidade.• Investimento em tecnologia, expansão, etc., tudo depende desta fórmula básica. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 43
    • 44. Tipos de Estruturas Organizacionais Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 44
    • 45. Gerindo um Processo da Cadeia de Valor Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 45
    • 46. Usando dois Chapéus de Gestão• Muitas das organizações têm gestores funcionais que também servem como gestores de processos.• Em algumas organizações o Gestor de uma Linha de Negócio é muito parecido com o Gestor de uma Cadeia de Valor e a mesma pessoa pode preencher as duas funções• Em organizações menores, com apenas uma cadeia de valor o COO também serve como Gestor da Cadeia de Valor.• Usar dois chapéus sempre causa conflitos. É mais comum em organizações matriciais fracas do que em organizações matriciais fortes.• Poucas organizações têm mais que duas camadas de gestores de processos – na realidade, Gestores de Cadeia de Valor e Gestores de Processos Nível 1. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 46
    • 47. Gestão de Processos• Embora você organize, terá que gerenciar cada cadeia de valor, fluxo de valor principal ou subprocesso• Alguém tem que ser responsável por olhar que toda a cadeia de valor ou fluxo de trabalho juntos gerem o resultado desejado• Isso não algo que um gestor funcional pode fazer sozinho• Gestores funcionais sempre querem sub-otimizar ; eles fazem as coisas para seus departamentos às custas da cadeia de valor, como um todo• Para muitas organizações, gestão de processos não é algo que gestores existentes são treinados a fazer – você precisa defini-los e treina-los para focar nos processos todo como um todo, estabelecer metas claras e estabelecer bônus, e então dar suporte a eles. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 47
    • 48. Usar Processos Depende do Conhecimento sobre seusProcessos• Há várias maneiras de falar sobre processos• Se você focar na Gestão de Processos, você precisa de consenso sobre quais cadeias de valor sua organização possui e quais fluxos de valor compõem essas cadeias de valor.• Você precisa de uma Arquitetura de Processos de Negócio• Isso NÃO É algo que você deve confiar a seu grupo de TI. É algo que os executivos da organização precisam criar Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 48
    • 49. Uma Boa Arquitetura de Processos de Negócio Inclui• Um modelo das cadeias de valor e processos de fluxo de valor da organização – um conhecimento sobre como as coisas fluem para obtenção dos resultados desejados• Uma descrição das políticas/regras de negócio usadas para tomar decisões chave em cada cadeia ou fluxo de valor• Uma descrição dos valores que estão sendo produzidos, e os Indicadores Chave de Performance (KPIs ou métricas) claros, para medir os resultados• Medição constante• Gestores de Processos responsáveis por obter os KPIs específicos associados a cada cadeia ou fluxo de valor Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 49
    • 50. Cadeia de Valor de Uma Companhia dePetróleo NacionalEssa arquitetura foi desenvolvida por executivos do comitê dacompanhia, especificamente para atribuir papéis de gestão. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 50
    • 51. Boeing GMS identificou mais de 300 processos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 51
    • 52. Cadeias de Valor Apoiam Altos Níveis deAnálise• Considere esses dados financeiros sobre uma cadeia de valor apresentados nas demonstrações financeiras da organização (em milhões) Ano 1 Ano 2 Ano 3 Ano 4 Ano 5 Ano 6Receitas 12.1 37.3 70.5 98.3 116.9 170.7Despesas 12.4 35.3 63.9 88.5 106.7 157.7OperacionaisReceita/$1Dólarde despesas 0.98 1.06 1.10 1.11 1.10 1.08operacionais• Note que, se você for uma organização sem fins lucrativos, você pode considerar o custo de interações por cliente completadas com sucesso ao invés das receitas. Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 52
    • 53. Atualizado em Gráfico: A Produtividade está em Declínio Por que a Produtividade está em Declínio? 1.15 Revenue/$ of Operating Cost 1.1 1.05 1 0.95 0.9 1 2 3 4 5 6 Year Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 53
    • 54. Os Processos dão Razão a Todas as outras Perspectivas Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 54
    • 55. Gestão e Governança• Governança de BPM – Decidir como os processos de negócio serão gerenciados – Estabelecer políticas organizacionais para o gerenciamento de BPM• Gestão de BPM – Designar a responsabilidade de um processo específico para um individuo específico – Treinar gestores para implementar políticas de BPM – Monitorar performance de gestores Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved. 55
    • 56. Seis Grandes Áreas de Foco em Processos Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved.
    • 57. Para Maiores Informaçõeswww.bptrends.com A mais completa fonte de informação e análise sobre tendências, direções e melhores práticas no Gerenciamento de Processos de Negóciopharmon@bptrends.com Copyright © 2011 BPTrends Associates. All Rights Reserved.