ICT as a tool for collaboration    Jacob Davidsen & Marianne Georgsen  eLearning Lab, Aalborg University, Denmark         ...
Agenda• ICT in teaching and learning in schools –  promises and problems• The case of ”Move and learn” + our study• Findin...
ICT in teaching and learning in schools       – promises and problems• Political focus on the importance of using ICT in  ...
What is still missing• To find a way of developing teachers’  qualifications within pedagogic ICT-use• To relate this deve...
5
The case of ”Move and learn”• Interactive screens are introduced into two  second year classes• Computers are to be used i...
7
Studying interaction in the classroom                                        8
Interactional patterns in the          learning partnerships• The learners were very engaged in both solving the  tasks at...
Levels of interaction in shared work•   Light weight interactions•   Information sharing•   Coordination•   Collaboration•...
Gender…?• Numerous instances of an asymmetrical power  relation between girls and boys in the learning  situations• Stereo...
To work in pairs is to collaborate –             or is it…?• Collaboration seems to be observable in  nearly all cases – b...
Conclusions• The way pairs of students are decided on is an important  factor in achieving succesful learning partnerships...
New questions• What can the teacher do to guide the learners’  participation patterns towards a higher level of  communica...
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Marianne Georgsens presentation at the Designs for Learning conference 2010

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Marianne Georgsens presentation at the Designs for Learning conference 2010

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Marianne Georgsens presentation at the Designs for Learning conference 2010

  1. 1. ICT as a tool for collaboration Jacob Davidsen & Marianne Georgsen eLearning Lab, Aalborg University, Denmark marianne@hum.aau.dk
  2. 2. Agenda• ICT in teaching and learning in schools – promises and problems• The case of ”Move and learn” + our study• Findings• Learning to collaboration• Conclusions… and new questions 2
  3. 3. ICT in teaching and learning in schools – promises and problems• Political focus on the importance of using ICT in schools since late 1980’s  ICT can help develop teaching and learning further• National evaluation in Denmark shows that ICT in schools is used in three main ways: – as a motivator towards pupils (to make learning ”fun”); – by pupils to produce nice looking products and presentations; – but first and foremost to search information on the internet. 3
  4. 4. What is still missing• To find a way of developing teachers’ qualifications within pedagogic ICT-use• To relate this development to the teaching practice and orient it towards actual use of ICT in classrooms and schools 4
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. The case of ”Move and learn”• Interactive screens are introduced into two second year classes• Computers are to be used in all subjects• Use of technology is aimed at: – Strenghtening the collaborative skills of the learners, eg. by fostering communication and shared work in the classroom – Enabling multiple learning ”styles” – tactile, auditive and visual• 8 computers in two classrooms (20 pupils in each class)• Videoobservation with 8 cameras for 9 months 6
  7. 7. 7
  8. 8. Studying interaction in the classroom 8
  9. 9. Interactional patterns in the learning partnerships• The learners were very engaged in both solving the tasks at hand, and using the screens• Concentration is possible for most learners, even in a very lively classroom• Quite often, verbal contributions alone have no impact on the actions of the learning partner – interaction with the screen is a must• Learners often fail to agree on both goals and how to proceed with the work – very little explicit negotiation takes place• Despite having conflicts, the students were dependent on their partners – some times as an audience 9
  10. 10. Levels of interaction in shared work• Light weight interactions• Information sharing• Coordination• Collaboration• Cooperation”Cooperation demands the greatest amount and the highest quality of communication” Neale, Carroll & Rosson 2004 10
  11. 11. Gender…?• Numerous instances of an asymmetrical power relation between girls and boys in the learning situations• Stereotypical interpretations of interactional patterns – boys act up, girls try to solve the tasks…• The children compete for the ”toy” (the screen) – In the classroom setting it seems the girls are winning, whereas in the school yard more often the boys will win a fight 11
  12. 12. To work in pairs is to collaborate – or is it…?• Collaboration seems to be observable in nearly all cases – but very often this is not case• Sharing a tool and a task does not make collaboration by itself• In many cases, the word ”collaborate” seems to a term without sense and meaning in the context• A definition of collaboration is needed in order to teach collaborative skills 12
  13. 13. Conclusions• The way pairs of students are decided on is an important factor in achieving succesful learning partnerships• So is the role and the actions of the teacher• The collaborative potential of the technology and the setup is not fully exploited• A shared understanding is needed of the concept of collaboration and actions related to the practice of collaborating• The technology in this setup is a ressource for the learners as well as for the teacher• Learner autonomy makes way for the sometimes conflicting intentions of the learners 13
  14. 14. New questions• What can the teacher do to guide the learners’ participation patterns towards a higher level of communication and a deeper level of collaboration?• What are the potentials of peer learning in the case of very young learners?• What are the different roles of the learning partner – peer; audience; (technical) helper; other…?• Is there a novelty factor? Will interactional patterns change as the interactive screen become as dull as books? 14

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