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Presentation at NMLA 2013 about serving middle school students in the public library and in the school library.

Presentation at NMLA 2013 about serving middle school students in the public library and in the school library.

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  • 1. Don’t Forgetthe MiddleTweens at the public library andthe school library
  • 2. Keep it Tween FriendlyFocus on building a relationship, notcontrolling. Pam Leo, author of ConnectionParentingmakes this point:“The level of cooperation parents get fromtheirchildren is usually equal to the level ofconnection children feel with theirparents….”Many times, as school librarian or even aspublic librarian, we are in loco parentis,sowe must think in terms of our parentingskills.
  • 3. Keepin’ it TweenFriendly, cont’d.Focus on praising goodbehavior, not punishment.Be as honest as possible withoutbeing rude.
  • 4. Programs for Tweens• Programs should focus on what THEY like, not what you like. Choicesand buy-in are very important• Activities focused on the self, surveys, quizzes—adolescents arebuilding the self. Example: Abbreviated Myers Briggs survey.• SLAM poetry: view video example, read examples and write ourown poetry (see next slide for details)• Healthy Snack program: involved local food coop, they brought stufffor a smoothie and had a trivia game about nutrition (use your linksto the community)• Getting to know you activities to break the ice and buildrelationships. Example: Snow Ball Fight.• School environment: multiple intelligences—they find out how theylearn best. Assessment of Multiple Intelligences.• BEST OF program.
  • 5. SLAM Poetry ProgramBooks I Read From or Offered as Inspiration• The Rose that Grew from Concrete byTupac Shakur• Poetry Speaks Who I am: Poems ofDiscovery, Inspiration Independence and Everything Elseedited by Elise Paschen with CD of recorded poems• Time You Let Me In, edited by Naomi Shihab NyeActivities:• Show some videos from YouTube of tweens reading theirown poetry as inspiration. Search for Middle Schoolpoetry SLAM on YouTube.com.• Write an example of your own to share with kids.• If available, record their poetry readings on video oraudio recording device.
  • 6. Poetry Presentation for School• ..DownloadsPoetry(3).ppt Suitable for grades 6 to 9.• Naomi Shihab Nye "One Boy Told Me“
  • 7. Survey sent to 6th grade classes &Middle SchoolHAWK Hangout Survey• What activity would you like to do this summer at the Mesa Public libraryduring Hawk Hangout (Tuesdays from 2:00 to 4:00pm)?• What is your favorite book you have read recently?• What is your favorite movie you have seen recently?• What is your favorite music right now?• What games would you like to play at Hawk Hangout?• What are your favorite snacks to eat?• If you have ideas or suggestions for Hawk Hangout, please contact Ms.Ellie at eleanor.simons@lacnm.us
  • 8. Survey Responses (real lifeexamples)• Play games like Apples to Apples, DDR, JustDance, Twister, UNO, Poker & Duck-Duck Goose• Do crafts like Duct Tape Crafts, Bead Bracelets &coloring extra large Posters• Do digital projects with apps like LaDiDa andSongify• Watch movies like: Holes, Yellow Submarine,Howl’s Moving Castle, My Neighbor Totoro,Twilight, etc.• Water Balloon Fight party at the end of summer
  • 9. Keep yourself connected• http://www.teenreads.com/• Middle School Matters• Social media: Facebook, Pinterest,Tumblr Ms. Ellies pinterest board YS• Good Reads website: look for groups like“Addicted to YA”http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/64233-addicted-to-yaVOYA (Voice of Youth Advocates) in print and onlineBlogs by colleagues:http://www.fatgirlreading.com/ Angie ManfrediPublic Libraries Online:http://publiclibrariesonline.org/2013/03/unattended-children-no-easy-answers/RSS Feed—ListServs, both easy ways to keep up with professionalideas and writings. Ex.: PUBYAC ListServ
  • 10. Orientation for School Library• Examples:• Prezi school Library Orientation• Welcome to LAMS Library Media Center
  • 11. Library Lessons• Mythology Powerpoint and Mythology AssignmentChildrens Literature: Creative Writing powerpointFolklore as Genre powerpointSince so many of my lessons depend upon computers beingavailable, I ALWAYS have an emergency plan for if the powergoes out. The Quote Box.“Bringing the Mountain” --I take a cart full of attractive fictionbooks to a classroom and do a book talk for several titles andtake my laptop to check books out to students after the booktalks.
  • 12. Information is Power—Empower your students• Using databases: Funded by state of New Mexico (free toevery school) Cengage Databases• Every student who leaves middle school should know what adatabase is and basically how to use it. (A database is reliableinformation, a wiki is not.) They should know the differencebetween these: 1) website 2) database 3) wiki 4) blog• Evaluating information found on the internet (see next slide)
  • 13. Evaluating Websites—Teachstudents to evaluate their sources• Especially for Middle School Students• Excellent video on YouTube about Using Websites• Lesson Plan for teaching evaluation of websites• Make sure your students know the difference between.org, .com, .net, .edu, .UK, etc.• Middle School Library website• Professionalwebsite evaluation handout.pdf
  • 14. Reading Nonfiction—Teaching the Skills• Offer this to Language Artsteachers, especially before researchprojects.• Demonstrate effective nonfiction readingon overhead, online or on the interactivewhiteboard (SmartBoard)• Go through the techniques—see chart andoutline that follow
  • 15. Teaching to Read NonfictionReading Nonfiction or TextbooksI. PreviewA. Look at title, subtitles & headings1. gives you a map of whats ahead.B. Look at pictures and tables1. These give hints about the topic too.II. Get the GistA. Find the main idea or theme1. Make notes or highlight textB. Summarize the main points1. Take notes or draw a mind map.What do you know and what do you need to know?I. CLICK! I know about these things!A. This is your foundation--everything ties to this.II. CLUNK! I dont understand this.A. Resolve: Get more information in order to understandIII. Make a record--usually notes or a graphic organizer
  • 16. Resources I use over and over• TeacherTube.com : Free downloadable educational videos• Slideshare.com : Free shared powerpoints• QuestGarden.com : search and find webQuests and/or makeyour own. Example: Harlem Renaissance Free to search anduse, but to make your own, you must have a membership.• Animoto.com : free Educators membership• Prezi.com : really cool presentation app, free educatormembership.• Camtasia app: super easy to use way to make screen capturevideos—really useful for instruction. See this Review.• Padlet: I use this as a kind of scrapbook for our programs:• Hawk Hangout Summer 2012
  • 17. Insert Creativity•Creativity video wit Naomi Shihab NyeHuge advantage the school Librarianhas:We teach, but we do not grade.Like the school counselor—we have anopportunity to be an asset for thestudents. See 40 developmental assetsGet out of YOUR story and into the BIGstory.
  • 18. Graduate your tweens to theTeen program• Quote of one of our teen patrons: “I didn’t know who I was‘till I read this book….” About reading Through to You by EmilyHainsworth.• This is one of our patrons who is now in the Teen programwho was a tween program patron.
  • 19. The big picture: Connectingtweens to the world of BOOKS