Insecta Report

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Insecta Report

  1. 1. Insecta:

 Butterflies,
Moths,
and
Dragonflies!

 Picture by flickr user: “Just Me....” “DON’T TOUCH THAT BUTTERFLY, IF YOU DO IT WILL DIE!” Through my research, I have come to find that, that myth is not necissarily true. If you touch the butterfly and all the white ‘powder’ on its wings comes off, then it will not be able to fly anymore and therefore; it will die. But, if you touch it quickly, and the powder does not come off, it will not die because, it will still be able to fly. B as i c 
 I nfo r ma tion 
 All
butterflies
and
almost
all
moths
have
two
pairs
of
wings.
On
pair
are
the
large
front
wings
and
the
other
is
a
pair
of
smaller
hind
wings.
Moths
and
 butterflies
when
combined
together
form
the
insect
group
Lepidoptera.
The
name
Lepidoptera
originates
from
two
Greek
words:
Lepis,
meaning
scale;
 and
Pteron,
meaning
wing.
The
name
refers
to
the
fine,
powdery
scales
that
cover
the
wings
of
butterflies
and
moths.
 Most
insects
have
three
parts
to
their
body.
(1)
The
head,
(2)
the
thorax,
and
(3)
the
abdomen.
 
 I nt e rn a l
Sy st e m s 
 ‘ R e s p i r a tor y 
S ys te m ’ 
 Insects
have
many
internal
systems.
The
respiratory
system
is
one
of
the
most
important.
The
butterflies,
moths
and
dragonflies
are
all
‘wired’
the
same.
They
all
have
the
 same
respiratory
system.
They
have
organs
for
breathing
that
are
located
in
their
abdomen.
That
is
also
where
they
have
the
ability
to
take
in
oxygen.
Insects
breathe
through
 a
much
simpler
passive
respiration
process.


 E x te r n al
T r a nspo rt 
 ‘ Ge tt ing
 a r oun d ’ 
 External
transport
is
how
an
animal
moves
from
one
place
to
another.
The
butterfly,
the
moth,
and
the
dragonfly
all
use
the
same
means
of
‘transportation’.
They
all
use
their
 wings
to
fly
to
different
places.
They
all
have
a
‘front
wing’
and
a
‘back
wing’
which
help
to
make
it
easy
for
them
to
get
around.

They
also
use
their
little
legs
to
walk
on
hard
 surfaces.


 N u tr i tion 
 ‘ M mm . . Food ! ’ 
 The
butterfly,
the
moth,
and
the
dragon
fly
have
a
digestive
system
that
is
designed
to
handle
a
‘liquid
diet’.
They
have
an
organ
called
the
‘pharynx’
that
is
at
the
base
of
its
 ‘proboscis.’
(nose)
It
expands
to
create
a
‘vacuum’
and
that
allows
the
liquid
to
be
sucked
up
the
length
of
the
proboscis.
After
the
food
is
sucked
up,
it
is
pushed
through
the
 ‘thorax’
and
then
into
the
abdomen
by
contracting
muscles
that
line
its
digestive
track.
After
that,
the
food
is
stored
in
an
organ
called
the
‘crop’
until
the
body
needs
its
 nutrients.
When
it
is
needed,
the
food
will
then
travel
to
the
mid‐gut
where
the
nutrients
are
absorbed
and
digested
by
the
blood
or
stored
as
fat.
Then,
when
it
is
done
in
the
 mid‐gut,
it
travels
to
the
hind‐gut
where
the
water
is
absorbed
into
the
rectum.

They
mostly
eat,
smaller
bugs,
and
suck
nutrients
out
of
flowers,
and
fruits.

 
 R e pr o d ucti o n 
 ‘ T h e 
 M at in g
Pr oce s s ’ 
 Butterflies
and
moths
have
the
same
kind
of
mating
system.
They
don’t
reproduce
until
there
are
adults,
obviously.
The
male
attaches
himself
(using
his
‘claspers’)
to
the
 female
by
linking
their
‘abdomens’
together.

The
male’s
reproduction
organs
are
located
inside
of
his
abdomen.
The
mating
occurs
in
the
females
‘pouch’
that
is
located
in
her
 abdomen.
This
fertilizes
the
eggs.

Dragonflies,
on
the
other
hand
reproduce
asexually.
Asexual
reproduction
is
a
reproduction
that
does
not
involve
meiosis.

 
 R e s p o n se 
t o
 St imu li 
 ‘ M ov e !’ 
 Site:
t
hey
all
have
compound
eyes
as
adults.

 Touch:
The
way
that
the
butterfly,
moth,
and
dragonfly
respond
to
stimuli
is,
using
their
setae
(sensory
hairs)
including
the
antennae
to
feel
the
environment
around
them.
 Those
hairs
also
help
to
give
the
insect
signs
about
the
wind
while
it
is
flying.


 Smell
and
Taste:
they
use
their
antennae,
palps,
legs,
and
many
other
parts
of
their
bodies
that
are
studded
with
sense
receptors
that
they
use
to
smell.
They
use
their
sense
of
 smell
to
find
food
which
is
usually
flower
nectar,
and
also
to
find
mates.


  2. 2. Hearing:
They
use
their
wings
to
‘hear’
things.

 Balance:
they
use
the
Johnston’s
organ
that
is
located
at
the
base
of
their
antennae.
The
Johnston’s
is
responsible
for
maintain
its
sense
of
balance
during
flight.


 
 Ad ap ta ti on 
 ‘ W ha t 
 Ch a n ge s? ’ 
 The
butterfly,
the
moth,
and
the
dragon
fly
have
all
changed
over
the
years.

The
main
adaptation
I
could
find
was,
for
the
butterfly.
There
is
a
type
of
butterfly
called
the
 ‘Viceroy’
that
‘pretends’
to
be
the
monarch
butterfly
in
order
to
save
itself
from
predators.
They
‘know’
that
the
monarch
butterfly
tastes
bad
to
other
animals
so
they
pretend
 to
be
one
to
keep
from
being
eaten.
The
moths,
they
adapt
by
blending
in
with
their
surroundings
to
keep
from
getting
‘caught’
by
predators.
They
blend
into
trees,
and
other
 environments.
Dragonflies,
the
way
they
adapt
is,
they
can
tip
their
wings
in
order
to
regulate
their
body
temperature.
They
are
bullet
shaped
which,
helps
them
fly
fast.
They
 are
able
to
fly
forwards
and
backwards
and
can
change
direction
quickly.
They
can
fly
up
to
30
mph.

 
 F oo d 
 C hai n 
 ‘ W he re 
a r e
 you 
at ?’ 
 The
butterflies,
moths,
and
dragonflies,
are
at
the
bottom
of
the
food
chain.
They
are
pretty
much
the
same
as
any
insects.
There
are
so
many
animals
that
are
larger
than
them
 and
that
would
eat
them
up
in
‘one
bite.’
If
you
compare
the
monarch
butterfly
to
say,
a
great
white
shark,
there’s
pretty
much
no
comparison.
The
shark
and
things
like
it
are
 so
much
higher
up
in
the
food
chain
than
tiny
little
insects.
 
 G en e r al
 B ody 
St ru ctu r e 
 ‘ W ha t 
 pa r ts
 a re 
w hat ? ’ 
 The
butterfly
and
the
moth
share
pretty
much
the
same
structure.

 
 http://www.rivernen.ca/bf_parts.gif
 
 The
Dragonfly:
 
 http://www.snh.org.uk/publications/on‐line/naturallyscottish/dragonfly/images/
 4.%20Diagram%20Dragonfly%20BodyParts%20%28c%29BDS‐J.Stevens.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 

  3. 3. 
 B ac k g ro und
Infor m ati on 
 ‘ Cl as si fic a ti on ’ 
 The
group,
‘Insecta’
(insects)
is
a
class
of
the
large
animal
phylum
‘Arthropoda’
which
refers
to
the
jointed
limbs
that
it’s
members
has.
Because
insects
have
different
 ‘sections’
to
their
bodies,
they
are
considered
to
be
‘Arthropoda.’
 
 O the r 
 Org anis ms 
 ‘ B r ot h ers 
a n d 
Sis t ers’ 
 There
are
many
other
types
of
bugs
that
are
considered
to
be
part
of
insecta.
There
are
beetles,
and
flies,
and
bees,
and
crickets,
and
grasshoppers,
and
locusts,
and
a
bunch
of
 other
bugs.

 
 Ty pe 
 o f
Sy mme tr y 
 ‘ Ar e 
w e 
sy m metr ic al ? 
 Butterflies,
Moths,
and
Dragonflies
all
have
bilateral
symmetry.
 
 E x ti n c t
o r 
E ndange re d 
 Inse cts
 ‘ Ar e 
w e 
d yin g
of f? 
 Some
insects
that
are
endangered
are:
 The
Antioch
Katydid,

 Bay
Checkerspot
Butterfly



 

 
 
 
 El
Segundo
Blue
Butterfly

 
 Oregon
Silverspot
Butterfly

 
 
 Lange's
Metalmark
Butterfly

 
 Mission
Blue
Butterfly

 
 
 Palos
Verdes
Blue
Butterfly

 
 
 Kern
Primrose
Sphinx
Moth

 
 Delhi
Sands
Flower‐loving
Fly

 
 
 Smith's
Blue
Butterfly

 
 Lotis
Blue
Butterfly

 
 
 Myrtle's
Silverspot
Butterfly

 
 San
Bruno
Elfin
Butterfly

 
 Callippe
Silverspot
Butterfly

 
 
 Quino
Checkerspot
Butterfly

 
 Behren's
Silverspot
Butterfly
 
 I mp o r t an ce 
 ‘ W hy 
d o
t he y
m a tt e r?’ 
 Butterflies,
moths,
and
dragonflies
are
important
to
the
human
race
because,
they
can
help
pollinate
like
bees
and
birds
making
more
flowers
and
plants.
 
 
 By
flickr
 By
flickr
 user:
 user:
Vicki’s
 Histrel
 Nature
 By
flickr
user:
Jim‐AR

  4. 4. Sources:
 
 Butterfly’s internal systems: http://www.naturemuseum.org/online/thebutterflylab/anatomy/internalorgans.html 
 Moth’s
respiratory
system:
 
 http://www.worldbook.com/wb/worldbook/cybercamp/html/walkmoth.html
 
 
 http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/butterfly/allabout/Senses.shtml
 
 ‘Butterfly
parts’
picture:
 http://www.rivernen.ca/bf_parts.gif
 
 http://www.answers.com/
 
 
 


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