Queer theory

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A2 Media Studies, Queer theory

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Queer theory

  1. 1. Queer Theory
  2. 2. What is Queer theory? Feminism was the contrast between sex and gender – Queer theory offers the view that all identities are social constructions  The ideas of male and female are just as much the product of representations as masculinity and femininity  Queer theory does not concern itself exclusively with homosexuality – it is about all forms of identity 
  3. 3. Judith Butler – ‘Gender Trouble’    Judith focuses on the need to break the line between the categories of sex and gender so that all forms of sexual identity can be accepted and celebrated Queer theory attacks the binary oppositions which underline traditional ideas about sexuality e.g. man/woman, active/passive, gay/straight Butler says that no one has an innate sexual identity –repeated representations of heterosexuality will create the illusion that it is normal and right
  4. 4. representations of alternatives such as drag queens, butch lesbians, camp and macho gays have the capacity to subvert and denaturalise dominant heterosexual ideology  becoming more frequent in mainstream media – gay and lesbian characters appear in fictional TV without self evident tokenism  Examples?  Drag, camp comedy are all commonplace on early evening TV – Alan Carr  But does this signify a move towards increasing tolerance of sexual diversity? 
  5. 5. Some have argued that these representations simply present titillating, transgressive alternatives to ‘normal’ heterosexuality  These are often used because of their shock value, not to promote or celebrate diversity  Does the pantomime dame or the camp character in sitcoms do anything to subvert gender categories? 
  6. 6. Some have argued that these representations simply present titillating, transgressive alternatives to ‘normal’ heterosexuality  These are often used because of their shock value, not to promote or celebrate diversity  Does the pantomime dame or the camp character in sitcoms do anything to subvert gender categories? 

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