The Iowa Constitution and the Founding Fathers
Quote #1: Iowa Constitution: Preamble <ul><li>WE THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF IOWA, grateful to the Supreme Being for the bl...
Consider: <ul><li>We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality a...
Consider: <ul><li>Religion is of general and public concern, and on its support depend, in great measure, the peace and go...
Quote #2:  Iowa Constitution: Bill of Rights, Article 1, Section 2 <ul><li>All political power is inherent in the people. ...
Consider: <ul><li>The Declaration of Independence constituted all the inhabitants of European descent in the thirteen Engl...
Consider: <ul><li>The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions o...
Quote #3: Iowa Constitution: Bill of Rights, Article 1, Section 3 <ul><li>The General Assembly shall make no law respectin...
Consider: <ul><li>Without morals a republic cannot subsist any length of time; they therefore who are decrying the Christi...
Consider: <ul><li>[T]he primary objects of government are the peace, order, and prosperity of society. . . . To the promot...
Quote #4: Iowa Constitution: Bill of Rights, Article 5, Section 4 <ul><li>The Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdict...
Consider: <ul><li>If [the legislature] will positively enact a thing to be done, the judges are not at liberty to reject i...
Consider: <ul><li>Federalist #78:  “The judiciary, on the contrary, has no influence over either the sword or the purse; n...
Consider: <ul><li>“ Is that [the Judiciary department] formed by the Constitution? It is not…It is only declared that ther...
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Iowa constitution

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Iowa constitution

  1. 1. The Iowa Constitution and the Founding Fathers
  2. 2. Quote #1: Iowa Constitution: Preamble <ul><li>WE THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF IOWA, grateful to the Supreme Being for the blessings hitherto enjoyed, and feeling our dependence on Him for a continuation of those blessings, do ordain and establish a free and independent government, by the name of the State of Iowa … </li></ul>
  3. 3. Consider: <ul><li>We have no government armed with power capable of contending with human passions unbridled by morality and religion. Avarice, ambition, revenge, or gallantry, would break the strongest cords of our Constitution as a whale goes through a net. Our Constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other. </li></ul><ul><li>- John Adams, (2nd President of the US, 1st Vice-President under Washington) in a letter to the military, Oct. 11, 1798. </li></ul>Quote #1.1
  4. 4. Consider: <ul><li>Religion is of general and public concern, and on its support depend, in great measure, the peace and good order of government, the safety and happiness of the people. By our form of government, the Christian religion is the established religion… </li></ul><ul><li>- US Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase, Runkel v. Winemiller, 1799; also signer of the Declaration, and Chief Justice of Maryland. </li></ul>Quote #1.2
  5. 5. Quote #2: Iowa Constitution: Bill of Rights, Article 1, Section 2 <ul><li>All political power is inherent in the people. Government is instituted for the protection, security, and benefit of the people, and they have the right, at all times, to alter or reform the same, whenever the public good may require it. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Consider: <ul><li>The Declaration of Independence constituted all the inhabitants of European descent in the thirteen English Colonies of North America, one People, with all the attributes of rightful sovereign power. </li></ul><ul><li>- John Quincy Adams, Oration- July 4th- 1837 </li></ul>Quote #2.1
  7. 7. Consider: <ul><li>The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. …The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government. </li></ul><ul><li>- George Washington, Farewell Address, 1796 </li></ul>Quote #2.2
  8. 8. Quote #3: Iowa Constitution: Bill of Rights, Article 1, Section 3 <ul><li>The General Assembly shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; nor shall any person be compelled to attend any place of worship, pay tithes, taxes, or other rates for building or repairing places of worship, or the maintenance of any minister, or ministry. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Consider: <ul><li>Without morals a republic cannot subsist any length of time; they therefore who are decrying the Christian religion, whose morality is so sublime & pure, [and] which denounces against the wicked eternal misery, and [which] insured to the good eternal happiness, are undermining the solid foundation of morals, the best security for the duration of free governments. </li></ul><ul><li>- Charles Carroll of Carrollton, (signer of the Declaration of Independence) in a letter from Charles Carroll to James McHenry of November 4, 1800. </li></ul>Quote #3.1
  10. 10. Consider: <ul><li>[T]he primary objects of government are the peace, order, and prosperity of society. . . . To the promotion of these objects, particularly in a republican government, good morals are essential. Institutions for the promotion of good morals are therefore objects of legislative provision and support: and among these . . . religious institutions are eminently useful and important. . . . [T]he legislature, … ought to countenance, aid and protect religious institutions—institutions wisely calculated to direct men to the performance of all the duties arising from their connection with each other, and to prevent or repress those evils which flow from unrestrained passion. </li></ul><ul><li>Oliver Ellsworth, Chief-Justice of the Supreme Court, to the General Assembly of the State of Connecticut </li></ul>Quote #3.2
  11. 11. Quote #4: Iowa Constitution: Bill of Rights, Article 5, Section 4 <ul><li>The Supreme Court shall have appellate jurisdiction only in cases in chancery, and shall constitute a court for the correction of errors at law, under such restrictions as the General Assembly may, by law, prescribe; and shall have power to issue all writs and process necessary to secure justice to parties, and shall exercise a supervisory and administrative control over all inferior judicial tribunals throughout the state. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Consider: <ul><li>If [the legislature] will positively enact a thing to be done, the judges are not at liberty to reject it, for that were to set the judicial power above that of the legislature, which would be subversive of all government. </li></ul><ul><li>- Sir William Blackstone (renowned English law professor, second most-oft individual quoted by founding fathers) </li></ul>Quote #4.1
  13. 13. Consider: <ul><li>Federalist #78: “The judiciary, on the contrary, has no influence over either the sword or the purse; no direction either of the strength or of the wealth of the society; and can take no active resolution whatever. It may truly be said to have neither force nor will. . . . The judiciary, from the nature of its functions, will always be the least dangerous to the political rights of the Constitution. . . . [T]he judiciary is, beyond comparison, the weakest of the three departments of power. . . . [and] the general liberty of the people can never be endangered from that quarter. </li></ul><ul><li>- James Madison, John Jay & Alexander Hamilton, The Federalist (Philadelphia: Benjamin Warner, 1818), pp. 419-420. </li></ul>Quote #4.2
  14. 14. Consider: <ul><li>“ Is that [the Judiciary department] formed by the Constitution? It is not…It is only declared that there shall be such a department, and it is directed to be formed by the two other departments, who owe a responsibility to the people…. </li></ul><ul><li>- William Giles, member of the first federal Congress under the Constitution. The Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States (Washington: Gales & Seaton, 1851), Seventh Congress, 1st Session, pp. 585-586, 593, February 18, 1802 </li></ul>Quote #4.3

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