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Project Based Learning/Buck Institute

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  • 1. Project-Based Learning Institute - August 31st & September 1, 2010 - Court Square Dan Cordon, Assistant Director, Eagle Rock School and Professional Development Center ● Icebreaker - “What’s in a Name?” and “Our Proudest Classroom Moments” ● PBL: How can I juggle all the elements of quality projects? ● SuperBall Video - Managing a classroom is like controlling 100,000 superballs going down the street in San Francisco. ● By the end of PBL 101, you will have started planning a project by: ○ Understanding ?Main Course? PBL ○ Generating a Project Idea ○ Refining a Driving Question ○ Balancing Assessment Strategies ○ Gathering Tips for Managing Projects ● Buck Institute for Education - BIE.org - Starter Kit ● My Story - High School Teacher at full scholarship Alternative Residence Private High School (Eagle Rock School and Professional development Center) in Colorado exclusively for HS drop-outs - http://www.eaglerockschool.org/home/index.asp ○ All project-based ○ Minimum 6 trimesters - graduate when they demonstrate mastery in core courses ○ Value Driven 8 themes - 5 expectations - 10 commitments ● Individual Integrity ● Intellectual Discipline ● Physical Fitness ● Spiritual Development ● Aesthetic Expression ● Developing an expanding knowledge base ● Communicating effectively ● Creating and making healthy life choices ● Participating as an engaged global citizen ● Providing leadership for justice
  • 2. ● Live in respectful harmony with others ● Develop mind, body, and spirit ● Learn to communicate in speech and writing ● Serve the Eagle Rock and other communities ● Become a steward of the planet ● Make healthy personal choices ● Find, nurture and develop the artist within ● Increase capacity to exercise leadership for justice ● Practice citizenship and democratic living ● Devise an enduring moral and ethical code Think Share What Skills MUST students have to survive? ● Creative Thinking ● Critical Thinking ● Responsibility ● Self-Starter ● Bi-Literate/Bi-Cultural ● Cross Cultural Understanding ● Socially Adept ● Inquisitive ● Organized ● Better Studying Skills ● Problem Solvers Research - see bie.org/research What is Project - Base learning? “The belief that all genuine education comes about through experience does not mean that all experiences are genuinely or equally educative.” - John Dewey “My Project” California - The Mission
  • 3. The 22nd Mission Project - Seven Elements of PBL 1. Driving Question or Challenge 2. Need to Know - Why are you working on this project? Are they hungry to figure out a question? The passion in the “Need to Know” drives authentic learning. 3. Inquiry and Innovation - Inquiry= asking questions; Innovation 4. 21st Century Skills - working with others - may be replicated in the real world 5. Student Voice & Choice - 6. Feedback & Revision - Peer Assessment & Personal Review 7. Publicly presented products - outside evaluators review products - makes it more authentic. Authentic Projects - videos - MediaSavesTheBeach.com techhightech Think Share Revolution or Evolution: Would PBL be an evolution of your teaching, or a revoution? Or do you do it already? could you modify some of your current activities or projects so they have the 7 essential features of PBL? Comments ● How do we create projects that cover content that is tested? ● How do we assess projects? ● Organizing thoughts before they write their projects
  • 4. ABCD (Asset-Based Community Development) Principles & Goals ● Everyone has gifts ● For ABCD to work, everyone must give gits ● Identifies and mobilizes the assets of individuals, especially those who are marginalized (students) ● Builds relationships among community members, especially those that are mutually supportive ● Gives students more roles and power in schools; students help lead efforts Personal Assets ● Hand: Make a list of all those things you can do with your hands ● Head: Make a list of all those things you are good at with your brain ● Heart: Make a list of all those things you are passionate about ● Human: Make a list of important relationship in your neighborhood, community and beyond - people you can ask to get things done. Five Minute Activity Go to a new person in your group and ask them what their gifts are. Take note and share Individual Reflection - 10 minute activity 1. What are your gifts? What are your talents? What do you love to do? Come up with at least 7 capabilities. a. Gifts: scribing, listening/condensing/summarizing, problem-solving, implementing projects, designing curriculum projects b. Talents: technology, language, writing, analysis, broader thinking c. Love to Do: read, write, daydream, 2. What are questions that inspire you about your school? What are the questions that this year will be answered? a. Inspired:
  • 5. b. Questions for This Year: 3. What are your dreams and aspirations about PBL at your schools? What do you most often daydream about in regards to your work here? Complete this sentence at least 5 times: “It would be so great if I could...” a. Dreams/Aspirations about PBL at my school: b. Daydreams: c. It would be so great if I could ... Why Have A Driving Question? For Students ● Guides project work ● Creates Interest and/or the feeling of challenge ● Remind them “Why We’re Doing This Today” For Teachers ● Criteria for evaluating your driving question ● Will my students understand it? and find it intriguing? ● Is it open-ended and does it require a complex answer? ● To answer it, will my students need to learn important content and skills? ● Does it focus on an authentic issue, problem or challenge? Refining a Driving Question Watch this video. What do your notice about the process of refining a Driving Question?
  • 6. Tips From too big to manageable From too general to more concrete and localized From “sounds like a teacher” to learner-friendly To Dos ● generate a project idea ● refine a driving question ● determine culminating products PBL Project Overview Template - See bie.org/tools - Useful Downloads Assessment Traditional Assessment balanced with 21st Century Skills 21st Century Skills Assessment Critical Thinking Journal, test questions & performance tasks Collaboration Think Share Feedback & Revision - Critique Protocols - by Peers ● Be kind ● Be specific ● Be helpful Culture of Critique: What lessons did the video teach about using feedback & revision to
  • 7. create higher quality products. Critical Friends Tuning Protocol Presenters Presentation: project title & idea, driving question, culminating 7 minutes products. Entry events and any concerns you’d like feedback about. Everyone Clarification: Audience asks short clarifying questions 3 minutes Audience Good Stuff: Audience shares what they liked about the project 4 minutes Wondering Stuff: Audience shares their concerns and questions 4 minutes for consideration. Next Stuff: Audience shares ideas about resources and ways to 4 minutes enhance the project Presenters Reflection: Individual/Goal reflects on current thinking based on 3 minutes feedback/next steps Total Time 25 minutes Day Two - September 1, 2010 Video: “Herding Cats” Structuring Teams: Allow students to choose who will be on their team - VOICE & CHOICE Think Share Classroom Culture: What was the role of the teacher and the students? What behaviors promoted a culture of inquiry and independence?
  • 8. Entry Events: The first activity to form a team ● Field Trip ● Guest Speaker ● Film, Video, Website ● Simulation or Activity ● Provocative Reading ● Startling Statistics ● Puzzling Problem ● Piece of Rea or Mock Correspondence ● Song, Poem, Art ● Lively Discussion ● Word Wall - negative and positive words that mean ...; followed by personal reflection Think Share Launch the Inquiry: What struck you about the Entry Event (word wall with reflection) and the students’ response? How would this event initiate inquiry? ● Students were comfortable with the teacher and shared words that were risky. ● The event was set up as a game that became very serious at the end. First Day ● Entry Event ● Create Need to Know List ● Project Teams announced ● Discussion of expectations for teamwork ● First team meeting; team-building activity, contract, initial task list Project Packet ● Team Roster ● Project Calendar ● Rubric & Assessments ● Checklist of Requirements ● Templates for contracts, lists, etc.
  • 9. ● Presentation/Exhibition Schedule ● Resource List Formative Assessment - Kitty Karrier Project Requirements - produced varying quality projects ● low cost materials ● no metal parts ● fit underneath seat on a plan ● open & close access ● comfortable & Breathable ● rigid structure Check List versus Rubric - Rubrics are preferable ● create rubric with students ● rubric eliminates questions on how they will be assessed on their projects ● See rubistar for rubric template Last Day ● self and peer assessment ● project debrief and celebration Teaming Tips ● Teacher decides teams (or manages the process) ● Four is best ● Usually heterogeneous ● “Slacker hardball” ○ All slackers on the same team - sometimes works ○ Includes a “firing” clause in the contract ”You’re Fired” - Advice from some teachers Teaming Issues ● Dealing with Absenteeism ○ contract can help ○ review in advance
  • 10. Meet with Team Representatives ● Who is assigned to each role? ● What’s going on in this team? If you could wave a magic wand over this team, what would you fix? ”The Usual Suspects” - Line-Up Ensure individual accountability ● structure tasks so each team member contributes ● journal entries, status reports on who did what, self-assessment/peer assessment - check for alignment ● Each team member must be prepared to present the entire presentation alone ● Each member must be able to say what the other member’s role was ● Check-Ins: speak 45 seconds on the status of the project 100 Campbell Soup Cans by Andy Warhol Avoid death by repetitive presentations ● Careful planning ● Sleeping audience - have them execute a rubric of the presentations