NYC Social Studies Scope and Sequence K-8

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NYC Social Studies Scope and Sequence K-8

  1. 1. New York City K-8 SOCIAL STUDIES SCOPE & SEQUENCE TM Department of Education Joel I. Klein Chancellor 2008–2009
  2. 2. introduction THE NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION SOCIAL STUDIES SCOPE & SEQUENCE K-8 Social Studies is the integrated study of history, geography, economics, government and civics. More importantly it is the study of humanity, of people and events that individually and collectively have affected the world. A strong and effective Social Studies program helps students make sense of the world in which they live, it allows them to make con- nections between major ideas and their own lives, and it helps them see themselves as members of the world community. It offers students the knowledge and skills necessary to become active and informed participants on a local, national and global level. Social Studies must also help students understand, respect and appreciate the commonalities and differences that give the U.S. character and identity. The complexities of history can only be fully understood within an appreciation and analysis of diversity, multiple perspectives, interconnectedness, interdependence, context and enduring themes. The New York City DOE Social Studies Scope and Sequence is a comprehensive framework for Social Studies teaching in grades K-8 that brings together national standards, the ten thematic strands and the New York State Core Curriculum (content, concepts, key ideas, understandings and performance indicators). Each grade is organized around suggest- ed time frames for the teaching of core content (units of study) guided by essential questions. Within each unit of study are found the major content and concepts and their relation to specific standards, key ideas and performance indicators (referenced in green). Included with each grade are the appropriate reading/writing and research skills from the Information Fluency Continuum, as developed by the New York City School Library System. ADDENDUM: STATE MANDATED INSTRUCTION IN SOCIAL STUDIES New York State Education Law: Article 17, Sections 801-802 801. Courses of instruction in patriotism and citizenship and in certain historic documents. Summary: The Regents shall prescribe: 1. courses of instruction in patriotism, citizenship, and human rights issues (especially the study of the inhumanity of genocide, Slavery, the Holocaust, and the Irish Famine) to be maintained and followed in all the schools of New York State. All students over age eight shall receive this instruction. 2. courses of instruction in the history, meaning, significance and effects of the Constitution of the United States, the amendments, the Declaration of Independence, the New York State Constitution and its amendments, to be maintained and followed in all of the schools of the state. All students in eighth grade and higher shall receive this instruction. 3. a course of studies in the public schools, during a week designated by the Regents, to instill the purpose, meaning and importance of the Bill of Rights articles in the federal and state constitutions, in addition to the prescribed courses of study in the schools. 801-a. Instruction in civility, citizenship and character education. Summary: The Regents shall ensure that the instruction in grades Kindergarten through twelve includes a component on civility, citizenship and character education. 802. Instruction relating to the flag; holidays. Summary: The commissioner shall: 1. prepare a program providing a salute to the flag and daily pledge of allegiance to the flag, and instruction in respect for the flag, for the use of the public schools of the state of New York. 2. make provision for the observance of Lincoln’s birthday, Washington’s birthday, Memorial Day and Flag Day in the public schools. For the full text of these sections, visit http://www.emsc.nysed.gov/ciai/socst/leadersguide/ssrationale.htm#law. i
  3. 3. the ten thematic strands I Culture – A people’s way of life, language, customs, arts, belief systems, traditions, and how they evolve over time. II Time, Continuity, and Change – The importance of understanding the past and key historical concepts, analytically and from various perspectives. III People, Places, and Environments – The complex relationship between human beings and the environments within which they live and work. IV Individual Development and Identity – The exploration of human behaviors as they relate to the development of personal identities and the various factors that impact identity formation. V Individuals, Groups, and Institutions – The impact of educational, religious, social, and political groups and institutions and the integral roles they play in people’s lives. VI Power, Authority, and Governance – The complex purposes and features of individuals and groups with respect to issues of power and government. VII Production, Distribution, and Consumption – The role of resources, their production and use, technology, and trade on economic systems. VIII Science, Technology, and Society – The significance of scientific discovery and technological change on people, the environment, and other systems. IX Global Connections – The critical importance of knowledge and awareness of politics, economics, geography, and culture on a global scale. X Civic Ideals and Practices – The understanding that civic ideals and participatory citizenship are central to democracy. For a complete explanation of the Ten Thematic Strands, go to www.socialstudies.org/standards/strands ii
  4. 4. thinking skills It should be the goal of the instructor to foster the development of Social Studies thinking and process skills. The application of these skills allows students to understand and investigate important issues in the world around them. Inquiry-based units of study will include many or most of the following skills. These skills should be incorporated into students’ instruction as developmentally appropriate. Thinking Skills – comparing and contrasting Sequencing and – using the vocabulary of time and place – identifying cause and effect Chronology Skills – placing events in chronological order – drawing inferences and making conclusions – sequencing events on a timeline – evaluating – creating timelines – distinguishing fact vs. opinion – researching time and chronology – finding and solving multi-step problems – understanding concepts of time, continuity, and change – decision making – using sequence and order to plan tasks – handling diversity of interpretations – setting priorities Research and – getting information Map and Globe – reading maps, legends, symbols, and scales Writing Skills – organizing information Skills – using a compass rose, grids, time zones – looking for patterns – comparing maps and making inferences – interpreting information – interpreting and analyzing different kinds of maps – applying information – using cartographic tools – synthesizing information – creating maps – supporting a position Interpersonal and – defining terms Graph and Image – decoding images (graphs, cartoons, photos) Group Relation – identifying basic assumptions Analysis Skills – interpreting graphs and other images Skills – identifying values conflicts – drawing conclusions – recognizing and avoiding stereotypes – making predictions – participating in group planning and discussion – cooperating to accomplish goals – assuming responsibility to carry out tasks iii
  5. 5. SELF AND OTHERS kindergarten UNIT 1 UNIT 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 SCHOOL AND SCHOOL SELF AND OTHERS FAMILIES THE NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY September–October November–December January–March April–June Essential Question: What is a Essential Question: How are Essential Question: Why are Essential Question: How do school and what does it mean to people unique? families important? neighborhoods meet our needs? be a good citizen of a school community? The School and Classroom Community: Identity and Diversity: The Family Structure: People and Neighborhoods: • Classrooms are organized for student • All people share common characteristics • Families are important 1.2b • Neighborhoods have unique features learning 3.1a 3.1d • Families are made up of members 3.1a, (members, homes, schools, businesses, • A classroom has rules for all to follow • All people have needs (food, clothing, 3.1d places of worship, libraries, parks, leaders, 5.3b, 5.3c shelter) and wants (toys, games, treats) • Families can have a variety of structures police/fire stations) 3.1a, 3.1d • Rules are important 5.1b 4.1a (immediate and extended family) 3.1a, • A neighborhood is made up of many • Children have classroom responsibilities • Needs and wants are satisfied in a variety 3.1d different families 3.1a, 3.1d 5.3b, 5.3c of ways 4.1a • Families are diverse 3.1a, 3.1d • Neighborhoods reflect the languages and • Members of a classroom deserve to be • People are diverse 1.1a • Families have diverse cultures and traditions of the people who live there heard and deserve respect 5.3b, 5.3c, 5.3f • People are unique 3.1d customs 1.2b, 3.1d 1.2a, 1.2b • Teachers are important to classrooms 3.1a • Families share customs and beliefs • Neighborhoods have rules and routines People can be characterized by: (religion) 1.2b (garbage collection, street signs, crossing • Teachers help students learn 3.1a • gender (boy, girl) the street) 5.1b, 5.1c, 5.3b, 5.3c • Schools are special purpose buildings 3.1a • physical characteristics (height, eye and • Families celebrate in different ways 1.2b, 3.1d • People work in neighborhoods and have • A school community helps children learn hair color, age) 3.1d different jobs and responsibilities (police, 3.1a, 5.3b • ethnicity/culture (Spanish, Jewish, • Families celebrate important days together store owners, sanitation workers, • Many people work in schools and have African-American, etc.) 3.1d (birthdays, Mother’s Day, etc.) 1.2b, 3.1a, firefighters) 3.1a, 5.3b, 5.3c different jobs and responsibilities 5.3b, 5.3a • language (English, Korean, Arabic, • People in neighborhoods rely on each 5.3c Spanish, etc.) 3.1d • Family members have different jobs and other for goods, services and assistance • A school community helps in many ways responsibilities 3.1a, 5.3b, 5.3c • beliefs (cultural beliefs, religion) 3.1d 3.1a, 4.1a, 4.2 (health, etc.) 5.3b • Families have rules and routines 3.1a, Developing Identity: • Neighbors deserve respect and • A school is made up of diverse people and 5.3b, 5.3c understanding 5.3b, 5.3f • Culture 3.1a, 3.1d • Family members care for and help each students 3.1d • Neighborhoods can be represented and • Family values 3.1a, 3.1d, 5.3c other 3.1a, 5.3b • Members of the school community deserve located on a map 3.1b to be heard and deserve respect 5.3b, 5.3f • School, teachers 3.1a, 3.1d, 5.3c • Families have needs and wants (finances, • A neighborhood is part of a borough 3.1c, • School communities have missions, • Friends 3.1a, 3.1d economic decisions) 4.1f, 4.2a, 4.2b, 4.2c, 3.1d, 3.2a special songs, mottos 5.3b • Environment 3.1a, 3.1d, 3.1e 4.2d • New York City is made up of five • Schools have rules for all to follow 5.3b, • Family members rely on each other 3.1a, boroughs 3.1c, 3.1d, 3.2a 5.3c 5.3c p. 1
  6. 6. SELF AND OTHERS CONTINUED kindergarten UNIT 1 UNIT 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 SCHOOL AND SCHOOL SELF AND OTHERS FAMILIES THE NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY September–October November–December January–March April–June Essential Question: What is a Essential Question: How are Essential Question: Why are Essential Question: How do school and what does it mean people unique? families important? neighborhoods meet our needs? to be a good citizen of a school community? Community Geography: Self as Learner: • Families in New York City are urban • New York State is part of the United States • Places in the classroom can be located • Learning is important 5.3c, 5.3f families 3.1c, 3.1d 3.1c, 3.1d, 3.2a using directions 3.1c • People learn in different ways 3.1d • Families in cities share common • The United States is made up of many • Places in the school and neighborhood can • People learn from families and teachers characteristics 3.1d different states 3.1c, 3.1d, 3.2a be located using directions 3.1c 3.1a, 5.3c • Families use the city for work and • The United States can be located on a map • Schools are located in neighborhoods 3.1c • People have various talents and abilities leisure 3.1a, 3.1d (states, land and water masses) 3.1b, 3.1c • A school and community/neighborhood 3.1d Family History: School Neighborhood Study: can be located on a map 3.1c • People change and grow as learners 3.1a • All families have a history 1.2b, 1.2c • Neighborhood walks and maps 3.1a Citizenship and Communities: Developing Civic Awareness: • Families change over time 1.2b, 1.2c • Local businesses and special purpose • People can be citizens of the school, neigh- • Students help each other in many ways • Family history can be shared (names, buildings 3.1a borhood, and the United States 5.3b, 5.3c 5.3c family trees, letters, old photographs, etc.) • Special features (parks, museums, • Being a citizen involves rights and • Considerate classmates are good citizens 1.2b, 1.2c, 1.4b, 1.4c, 3.1a hospitals) 3.1a responsibilities 5.3 5.3b, 5.3c, 5.3f • Family histories can be recorded 1.2b • Neighborhood boundaries (e.g., East • Schools, neighborhoods, cities are part of • Being a citizen involves rights and • Families have a cultural heritage 1.2b, 1.3b River, Hudson River, Gowanus Canal, The United States 1.1c, 1.3a, 1.3c, 5.3a responsibilities 5.3e, 5.3f • Family histories may have started in other highway, train tracks, etc.) 3.1c, 3.1d • The flag is an important symbol of the • Communities/organizations identify/elect states/countries 1.2b • Neighborhood design 3.1d U.S. 5.3a leaders 5.2f • Families may have links/ties to other • History of the school neighborhood 1.2a, • U.S. residents recite the Pledge of states/countries 1.1a 1.4b Allegiance 5.3a • Family stories are passed down from one • Landmarks and monuments 1.3a, 1.4b • U.S. residents share special songs generation to another 1.2b, 3.1a • People (residents and workers) 3.1a, 3.1d (“The Star Spangled Banner,” • Families share folktales, legends, songs, • Visitors (tourists) 3.1a “America the Beautiful”) 5.3a dances, and oral histories 1.2b, 3.1a • Neighborhood architecture 3.1d • U.S. residents celebrate national holi- • Families have special foods, recipes 1.2b, • Transportation 3.1a, 3.1d, 3.1e days (Independence Day, Memorial Day, 3.1a • Local organizations 3.1a, 3.1d Thanksgiving, etc.) 5.3a • Families share traditions 1.2b, 3.1a • U.S. residents have rules and laws 5.1b, 5.1c, 5.3b p. 2
  7. 7. SELF AND OTHERS CONTINUED kindergarten UNIT 1 UNIT 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 SCHOOL AND SCHOOL SELF AND OTHERS FAMILIES THE NEIGHBORHOOD COMMUNITY September–October November–December January–March April–June Essential Question: What is a Essential Question: How are Essential Question: Why are Essential Question: How do school and what does it mean people unique? families important? neighborhoods meet our needs? to be a good citizen of a school community? • The President is the leader of the U.S. 5.2f • Washington, D.C., is capital of the U.S. 3.1c, 5.2f, 5.3a Information Fluency Continuum – Evaluate and use information – Demonstrate simple organizational skills – Show respect for the ideas of others – Identify one or two key words about a topic, – Present facts and simple answers – Work collaboratively problem, or question – Read a variety of fiction and non-fiction for – Show awareness of current events – Formulate questions enjoyment and information – Use materials to find answers to questions – Participate in discussions and listen well p. 3
  8. 8. MY FAMILY AND OTHER FAMILIES: NOW AND LONG AGO grade 1 UNIT 1 UNIT 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 FAMILIES ARE IMPORTANT FAMILIES, NOW AND LONG AGO FAMILIES IN COMMUNITIES THE COMMUNITY September–October November–December January–March April–June Essential Question: Why are Essential Question: How do Essential Question: What is a Essential Question: How do families important and how do families grow and change community? communities provide for they influence who we are? over time? families? The Family Unit: Families Then and Now The Community: Community Workers: • Families are a basic unit of all societies (Compare/contrast families • Families are part of communities 1.2a • People in the community have different 1.1a, 1.1c today with families of long ago): • There are different kinds of communities jobs (teachers, truck drivers, doctors, • Families are important units 1.1a, 1.1c • Families have existed for a long time 2.2a (school, cultural, religious, ethnic) 1.4b government leaders, etc.) 3.1a, 5.3b, 5.3c • Families are diverse 2.1c • Families lived in other places and at • Places in a community can be located on • There are people in the community who • Families have special structures 3.1a different times 2.2a a map and globe 3.1a, 3.1b help families to solve problems 4.1f • There are many different kinds of • Families change over time 1.2b, 1.2c • Cardinal directions can be used to locate • There are people in the community who family structures (nuclear, extended • Families of long ago share similarities and places and physical features of a help in emergencies 4.1f families) 3.1a, 3.1d differences with families today 1.2b, 2.2a community 3.1c • Community workers provide services 5.1c • Families have needs and wants 4.1a Looking at Change: • Symbols represent places and can be used • Community workers are diverse 3.1d • Families provide for needs and wants 4.1a, • Types of homes, buildings, architecture to locate geographic features and physical • Community workers interact 3.1a 4.1c 3.1a, 3.1d characteristics 3.1b, 3.1c • Community workers and businesses • Family members have various roles, jobs, • Clothing styles 3.1a • There are important places in communities change over time 2.2a and responsibilities 3.1a (monuments, parks, public buildings and • As communities develop new needs, jobs • Travel and transportation 3.1a places) 1.1a, 3.1c are created 3.1a • Families pass on knowledge, customs, • Work and occupations 3.1a language, traditions, etc. 1.2b • Communities celebrate holidays 1.1c, 5.3a • Food, leisure time, entertainment 3.1a Community Economics: • Families teach values and influence family • Communities/people affect the • Technology 1.3b, 3.1a • Families have needs 4.1a members 1.2b environment 3.1e • Education 1.1c, 3.1a • Communities meet people’s needs 4.1a, 4.2 • Families have rules and routines 5.3c • Communities have rules and laws 5.3b • Population 3.1d, 3.2a • People in communities work to earn mon- • Family members care for each other 1.1c, • Communities provide services to families • Role of women and children 1.1c, 3.1a ey to provide for their needs 4.1a, 4.1c, 4.2 3.1a 2.3a, 5.1c • People make decisions about money 4.1a, • Families celebrate in many ways Family History: • People in communities rely on each other 4.1b, 4.1c (birthdays, holidays) 1.1c, 2.1c, 5.3a • All families have a history (family mem- for goods and services 4.1a, 4.2 • Governments provide assistance to • Families are multi-generational bers, family trees, photographs) 1.4a, 2.3c • There are natural and manmade resources families and communities 5.1c (great-grandparents, grandparents, etc.) • The way families record their history in communities 3.1a, 4.1d • Problems arise when people want more 3.1a changes over time (letters, photographs, A Community Has a History: than the community can provide 4.1b, 4.1c videotapes) 1.2a, 1.2b • Communities change over time 2.2a • People use tools, science and technology • Changes in communities can be observed to meet their needs 4.1e and recorded 1.4c, 2.2b p. 4
  9. 9. MY FAMILY AND OTHER FAMILIES: NOW AND LONG AGO CONTINUED grade 1 UNIT 1 UNIT 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 FAMILIES ARE IMPORTANT FAMILIES, NOW AND LONG AGO FAMILIES IN COMMUNITIES THE COMMUNITY September–October November–December January–March April–June Essential Question: Why are Essential Question: How do Essential Question: What is a Essential Question: How do families important and how do families grow and change community? communities provide for they influence who we are? over time? families? Families Around the World: • Families share a cultural heritage (songs, • Special places/buildings in a community • People in communities conserve resources • Families can be found in communities dances, food, costumes, stories, etc.) 1.1a, can reveal the community’s history 3.2a (recycling, etc.) 4.1b around the world (China, Africa, Mexico, 1.2b • A community has historic significance Citizenship and Community: etc.) 2.1c • Family history is told through stories that (battle site, early settlement, burial • People are citizens of a community, city, • Families live in different kinds of are passed from generation to generation grounds, parades) 1.3a state, and nation 5.1a, 5.3b communities 3.1a, 3.1d 1.2b, 2.1a • Different events and people shape a • Citizens respect their community 5.3b, • All families have customs, traditions, and • Families share special folktales, oral community’s history 1.4b, 2.4b, 5.3a 5.3c beliefs 1.1a, 1.2b, 2.1c histories, biographies, legends 1.2b, 2.1a • Key historic figures/leaders of a • Citizens know and obey the community’s • Families influence the language(s) spoken • Family values, traditions, and beliefs are community 1.3c, 5.2f rules and laws 5.3b, 5.3c at home 1.1a, 1.2b taught and passed from generation to • The settlement of communities 3.2a • People can be community leaders 5.3e • All families are interdependent (socially, generation 1.2b • Inhabitants of communities 3.1d • Members of communities, cities, states, culturally, economically) 1.2a, 4.2, 5.3 • Families have celebrated special holidays • Communities are influenced by geography and nations have rights and responsibilities • Families provide for members in a variety for a long time 2.1c, 5.3a 3.2a 5.1e, 5.3c, 5.3d, 5.3f of ways 4.1a, 5.3c • Family growth and change can be • People in communities create monuments • People elect officials to represent them • Families share work and leisure time 3.1a documented (growth charts, photographs, to commemorate important people and 5.1a, 5.3e videos, etc.) 1.2b, 2.4c, 3.1a events (then and now) 1.3a, 5.1, 5.3a • People participate in the democratic • Family history can be plotted on a timeline • Communities have special buildings to process by voting responsibly 5.3e, 5.4 2.2b serve their residents (hospitals, courts, • Rules and laws can be changed 5.3e police stations) 5.1c • People show honor for their community, city, state and nation by respecting the flag and reciting the Pledge of Allegiance 5.1a, 5.3a • People respect, recall and commemorate the contributions of others to the commu- nity, city, state, and nation 1.3a, 5.1, 5.3a • New York City has many distinct and diverse communities 1.1a, 3.1d • New York City leadership (mayors, presidents—past and present) 5.2f p. 5
  10. 10. MY FAMILY AND OTHER FAMILIES: NOW AND LONG AGO CONTINUED grade 1 Information Fluency Continuum – Ask authentic questions – Recognize facts – Participate in discussions and listen well – Share information about a topic – Find facts that answer specific questions – Show respect for the ideas of others – Make connections to prior knowledge – Draw a conclusion about the main idea – Work collaboratively – Interpret information – Use writing process to express new understandings – Show awareness of current events – Read a variety of fiction and non-fiction for enjoyment and information p. 6
  11. 11. MY COMMUNITY AND OTHER U.S. COMMUNITIES grade 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 UNIT 1 UNIT 2 URBAN, SUBURBAN, AND RIGHTS, RULES, AND OUR COMMUNITY’S GEOGRAPHY NEW YORK CITY OVER TIME RURAL COMMUNITIES RESPONSIBILITIES September October–December January–March April–June Essential Question: How does Essential Question: How and why Essential Question: Why and Essential Question: What is the geography influence where did New York City change over how do communities develop relationship between local people choose to live and why? time? differently? government and the community? Geographic Terms and Features: FOCUS: Case study of New York City as Communities are Diverse: Communities and Government: • Maps and globes have special features 3.1c an urban community • Communities can be characterized as • Communities need rules and laws to solve • Landforms, bodies of water, hemisphere, – New York City is an urban community urban, rural, or suburban 3.1d problems and resolve conflicts 5.1a, 5.1b, continent, country, state 3.1b with special features 3.2a • Urban, rural, and suburban communities 5.4b • Location can be described using cardinal – features of New York City include sky- have special events, people, traditions, • People need rules for the use of directions (north, south, east, west) 3.1c scrapers, apartment buildings, factories, practices, and ideas 1.4b community resources 5.1c offices, houses, etc. 3.1e • Geography and natural resources shape • People elect community leaders to make, • Places have geographic and political boundaries 3.1c – there are many different types of industry where and how communities develop 3.1a, enforce, and interpret rules and laws 1.1b, in New York City (tourism, manufactur- 3.1e, 3.2a, 3.2b 5.3e • New York City, New York State can be ing, financial, etc.) 4.1e • Environmental factors influence the life- • Rules and laws have changed over time located on a map 3.1c – New York City has a rich and diverse styles of community residents (schools, to meet the needs of community members • The U.S. can be located on a world map cultural heritage 1.2b, 1.4b buildings, sports and recreation facilities, 5.1b, 5.1c, 5.4 3.1c – New York City is made up of neighbor- extreme weather preparation) 3.1a, 3.1e, • Community members are united by sym- • Maps provide information and have special hoods that reflect diversity (Chinatown, 3.2a bols of citizenship (the U.S. flag and its purposes 3.1c, 3.2b Harlem, El Barrio, Little Italy, etc.) 1.1a, • Features of urban, rural, and suburban display and use, the Pledge of Allegiance, • There are many different kinds of maps 1.2a, 1.4b communities are different 3.1d and national holidays) 1.1c, 5.1c, 5.3a 3.2b – people in New York City travel in a variety of FOCUS: Comparative case study FOCUS: Case study of local New York • People who make maps use special tools ways (subway, bus, car, ferry, tram, etc.) 3.1e of a suburban and rural community City government 3.1b – industries provide jobs for people in (Choose any U.S. suburban community – the three branches of government in Geography of New York City: New York City 4.1e, 4.1f and any U.S. rural community) New York City 5.2e, 5.2f • New York City can be located on a map – New York City has many cultural – rural communities are often far from each – local leaders and elections (mayor, deputy 3.1b, 3.1c institutions (mueums, historical societies, other, big towns or cities 3.1a, 3.1c, 3.1d mayor, city council, borough presidents, • The five boroughs make up New York City libraries, schools) 4.1f – suburban communities are residential community boards) 5.2e, 5.2f 3.1d – people all over the world visit New York towns on the outskirts of a city or large – city government departments (Department • People can read maps to learn about City 3.1a town 3.1a, 3.1c, 3.1d of Education, Transportation, Health, etc.) New York City 3.2a – New York City remains connected to its – suburban homes are generally on smaller 5.2e, 5.2f • Special buildings can be located on a map historical heritage (street and place names, areas of land than rural homes 3.1a, 3.1d – government buildings and their functions 3.1c old buildings, parades, museums, histori- – suburban homes are usually located in (City Hall, courts, post office, etc.) 5.2e • New York City contains many geographic cal re-enactments, etc.) 1.1a, 1.2b neighborhoods 3.1a, 3.1d features (canals, rivers, hills) 3.1b, 3.1d p. 7
  12. 12. MY COMMUNITY AND OTHER U.S. COMMUNITIES CONTINUED grade 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 UNIT 1 UNIT 2 URBAN, SUBURBAN, AND RIGHTS, RULES, AND OUR COMMUNITY’S GEOGRAPHY NEW YORK CITY OVER TIME RURAL COMMUNITIES RESPONSIBILITIES September October–December January–March April–June Essential Question: How does Essential Question: How and why Essential Question: Why and Essential Question: What is the geography influence where did New York City change over how do communities develop relationship between local people choose to live and why? time? differently? government and the community? • Geographic features influence – New York City communities are connected – rural areas may have limited public • Participation in decision making, problem communities 3.1e, 3.2a by a system of bridges and tunnels 3.1d, 3.1e services (hospitals, police, public solving, and conflict resolution 2.3a, 5.1d, • Communities use human and natural New York City Long Ago: transportation, etc.) 3.1a, 3.1d, 4.1f 5.3e, 5.3f, 5.4 resources in different ways 2.3c, 3.1a, • New York City has changed over time and – suburbs have lower populations than • Community leaders represent the people in 3.1d, 4.1d will continue to change in the future 1.1, urban communities 3.1a, 3.1d a neighborhood, borough, city, state, etc. • A community’s location is relative to other 1.2, 1.4 – rural communities have lower populations 5.2b communities 3.1c • The cultural landscape of New York City than suburban communities 3.1a , 3.1d • Community resources provide public • People adapt and make changes to the includes old and new features (historic – types of transportation in rural and urban services (library, hospital, playground, environment 3.1e buildings, skyscrapers) 2.2d communities may be different 3.1a, 3.1d, etc.) 3.1a, 4.1a, 4.1c, 4.1f • New York City has unique geographical • New York in the 1600s was inhabited by 3.1e • Community resources require community features (East River, Hudson River, Lower various Native American peoples 1.2, 1.3a – people in suburbs often commute to cities workers (fire fighters, police officers, New York Bay, Atlantic Ocean, canals, • Famous explorers arrived in present day for work 3.1a, 3.1d, 3.1e sanitation workers, teachers, etc.) 3.1a, etc.) 3.1b. 3.1c New York City (Henry Hudson) 1.1a – U.S. suburbs are growing 3.1a, 3.1d 4.1a, 4.1c, 4.1f • New York City communities are close to • The Dutch and English influenced early – people in rural areas may work where • New York City as a commercial, industrial, bodies of water 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.2a New Amsterdam, New York City 1.1a tourism center 3.1d they live 3.1a • Waterways are important to New York City Looking at Change: – agriculture is an industry in rural • State and national leaders are elected 3.1a, 3.2a • New York City changed and grew during communities 3.1a, 3.1d, 4.1d (governor, senators, president) 5.2f • New York City is made up of many the 1700s, 1800s, 1900s – vegetation and wildlife may be more • Local government’s relationship to islands, large and small, habited and • Physical environment 3.1d, 3.1e abundant in rural areas 3.1a, 3.1d national government 5.2d, 5.2e uninhabited 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.2a • Population/ immigration/migration 1.1a, – there are advantages and disadvantages • New York City’s relationship to global • The islands of New York City are con- 1.2a, 1.4b to living in both rural and suburban leaders (United Nations) 5.1e nected by bridges and tunnels 3.1e, 3.2a • Size, shape, homes and buildings 1.3a, communities 1.2a, 3.1a, 3.1c, 3.1e, 3.2a, • New York City has a unique landscape 3.1d 1.3b, 3.1e 4.1a, 4.2 • New York City’s vegetation and wildlife 3.1d • Use of natural resources 3.1a, 4.1d – migration patterns exist in all communi- • New York City has both a physical and • Methods of transportation 3.1a, 3.1d, 3.1e ties (urban to suburban, suburban to rural, cultural landscape 3.1d • Jobs and industry 3.1a, 4.1c, 4.1e etc.) 3.1a • New York City residents are influenced by • Technological advances 1.3b the geography (travel, jobs, architecture, • Evolution of communities and etc.) 3.2a neighborhoods 1.1a, 1.2a, 1.4b p. 8
  13. 13. MY COMMUNITY AND OTHER U.S. COMMUNITIES CONTINUED grade 2 Information Fluency Continuum – Ask authentic questions – Draw a conclusion about the main idea and – Participate in discussions and listen well – Identify overall “big picture” idea supporting details – Show respect for the ideas of others – Ask “I wonder” questions – Use simple note-taking strategies – Work collaboratively – Select and use appropriate sources – Use writing process to express new understandings – Credit sources by citing author and title to answer questions – Read a variety of fiction and non-fiction for enjoyment – Draw conclusions about the effects of and information current events p. 9
  14. 14. WORLD COMMUNITIES, NOW AND LONG AGO grade 3 UNIT 1 UNIT 2–7 INTRODUCTION TO CASE STUDIES OF A COMMUNITY IN AFRICA, ASIA, SOUTH AMERICA, THE CARIBBEAN, WORLD GEOGRAPHY AND MIDDLE EAST, EUROPE, SOUTHEAST ASIA, OR AUSTRALIA WORLD COMMUNITIES TEACHER SHOULD SELECT 3-6 WORLD COMMUNITIES TO STUDY THAT REFLECT DIVERSE REGIONS OF THE WORLD September–October November–June Essential Question: What Essential Question: How do culture, history, geography, people, and government shape the development are the important features of a community? of communities through- out the world? World Geography: Example 1: Africa Example 2: Asia Example 3: Europe Example 4: South America • Hemispheres, continents and – large and diverse continent 3.1c – large and diverse continent 3.1c – diverse continent 3.1c – large and diverse continent 3.1c countries can be located on world – located and identified by geo- – located and identified by – located and identified by – located and identified by maps and globes 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.2a graphical features 3.1b, 3.1c, geographical features 3.1b, 3.1c, geographical features 3.1b, 3.1c, geographical features 3.1b, 3.1c, • Different kinds of maps are 3.1d 3.1d 3.1d 3.1d created to provide specific – many unique features (Sahara – many unique features (Gobi Des- – many unique features (the Alps, – many unique features (rain information 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.2a Desert, savannah, rainforest, ert, Himalayas, volcanoes) 3.2a pine forests, fjords) 3.2a forest, islands, mountains, • Continents and countries have Great Rift Valley, rivers, – variety of climates (tropical, – variety of climates (frigid, mild, glaciers) 3.2a geographic features such as mountains, etc.) 3.2a sub-tropical, etc.) 3.2a etc.) 3.2a – variety of climates 3.2a oceans, rivers, mountains, etc. – variety of climates (arid, – described by regions (East Asia, – described by regions (Eastern – contains many different countries 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.2a semi-arid, tropical, etc.) 3.2a Central Asia, South Asia, Europe, Western Europe) 3.2a 3.2a • Places can be located using – described by regions (North, Southeast Asia) 3.2a – many islands and peninsulas – many islands (Galapagos) 3.2a cardinal and intermediate Sub-Saharan, and South Africa, – many islands and archipelagos (Greece) 3.2a – connected and separated by directions 3.1c etc.) 3.2a 3.2a – contains many different countries rivers and waterways and other • Places be located relative to – contains many different countries – contains many different countries 3.2a geographic features (Amazon, distance from Equator and Prime 3.2a 3.2a Panama Canal, Strait of – connected and separated by Meridian (scale, latitude, and – connected and separated by Magellan) 3.2a – connected and separated by rivers and waterways (Siene, longitude) 3.1c rivers and waterways and other rivers and waterways and other Thames, Rhine, Mediterranean – natural resources (minerals, oil) • People adapt to the environment geographic features (Nile River, geographic features (Ganges, Sea) and other geographic 3.1d, 3.1e 3.1e Lake Victoria, Suez Canal) 3.2a Yangtze, Himalayas) 3.2a features 3.2a – vegetation and wildlife • Communities use human and – natural resources (diamonds, – natural resources (petroleum, – natural resources (olives, grapes, (capybara, llama, jaguar, macaw, natural resources in different gold, oil, ebony) 3.1d, 3.1e forests) 3.1d, 3.1e fish, coal, forests) 3.1d, 3.1e vampire bat) 3.1d ways 2.3c, 3.1d, 4.1d – vegetation and wildlife (lions, – vegetation and wildlife (tigers, – vegetation and wildlife (wolves, zebras, rhinoceros, gorillas, etc.) pandas, orangutans, Asian sheep, red squirrels, reindeer) 3.1d elephants) 3.1d 3.1d p. 10
  15. 15. WORLD COMMUNITIES, NOW AND LONG AGO CONTINUED grade 3 UNIT 1 UNIT 2–7 INTRODUCTION TO CASE STUDIES OF A COMMUNITY IN: AFRICA, ASIA, SOUTH AMERICA, THE CARIBBEAN, WORLD GEOGRAPHY AND MIDDLE EAST, EUROPE, SOUTHEAST ASIA, OR AUSTRALIA WORLD COMMUNITIES TEACHER SHOULD SELECT 3-6 WORLD COMMUNITIES TO STUDY THAT REFLECT DIVERSE REGIONS OF THE WORLD September–October November–June Essential Question: What Essential Question: How do culture, history, geography, people, and government shape the development are the important features of a community? of communities through- out the world? Culture, Civilization, and FOCUS: Case study of an FOCUS: Case study of an Asian FOCUS: Case study of a FOCUS: Case study of a South Historical Time African community (Nigeria, community (China, Japan, European community (England, American community (Brazil, • All countries and civilizations South Africa, Zimbabwe, etc.) Vietnam, etc.) Italy, Sweden, Romania, etc.) Peru, Argentina, etc.) have culture 2.1c – location and key geographical – location and key geographical – location and key geographical – location and key geographical • Culture encompasses all that features 3.1c features 3.1c features 3.1c features 3.1c people do, create, value, and – impact of geography and climate – impact of geography and climate – impact of geography and climate – impact of geography and climate believe 2.1c 3.1e, 3.2a 3.1e, 3.2a 3.1e, 3.2a 3.1e, 3.2a • Cultures and civilizations – people and groups then and now – people and groups then and now – people and groups then and now – people and groups then and now develop and change over time (issues of diversity/homogeneity) (issues of diversity/homogeneity) (issues of diversity/homogeneity) (issues of diversity/homogeneity) 2.1c, 2.2d 2.3a, 2.3b 2.3a, 2.3b 2.3a, 2.3b 2.3a, 2.3b • Countries and civilizations have – economic systems and trade – economic systems and trade 4.1e, – economic systems and trade 4.1e, – economic systems and trade 4.1e, cultural landscapes (pyramids, (marketplace) 4.1e, 4.1f, 4.2 4.1f, 4.2 4.1f, 4.2 4.1f, 4.2 silos, windmills, skyscrapers) that – important contributions – important contributions – important contributions – important contributions include old and new features 2.2d (inventions, folk tales, resources, (inventions, folk tales, resources, (inventions, folk tales, resources, (inventions, folk tales, resources, • Historical time can be measured etc.) 2.1c etc.) 2.1c etc.) 2.1c etc.) 2.1c and represented by timelines – the legacy of traditional culture – the legacy of traditional culture – the legacy of traditional culture – the legacy of traditional culture (eras [BCE/CE], millennia, cen- (arts, music, dance, literature) (arts, music, dance, literature) (arts, music, dance, literature) (arts, music, dance, literature) turies, decades) 2.2a, 2.2b, 2.2c 2.1a, 2.1c. 2.2d 2.1a, 2.1c. 2.2d 2.1a, 2.1c. 2.2d 2.1a, 2.1c. 2.2d • Changes can be observed in a – celebrations and important – celebrations and important – celebrations and important – celebrations and important person’s way of life events 2.4c events 2.4c events 2.4c events 2.4c (transportation) 4.1, 5.1 – family structures, religion, – family structures, religion, – family structures, religion, – family structures, religion, • All peoples have rich cultural school, work and leisure time school, work and leisure time school, work and leisure time school, work and leisure time traditions that are passed down 2.1c, 2.4b 2.1c, 2.4b 2.1c, 2.4b 2.1c, 2.4b from generation to generation in – differences between urban and – differences between urban and – differences between urban and – differences between urban and a variety of ways 2.1 rural communities 2.1a, 2.4b, rural communities 2.1a, 2.4b, rural communities 2.1a, 2.4b, rural communities 2.1a, 2.4b, 2.4c, 3.1d, 3.1e 2.4c, 3.1d, 3.1e 2.4c, 3.1d, 3.1e 2.4c, 3.1d, 3.1e p. 11
  16. 16. WORLD COMMUNITIES, NOW AND LONG AGO CONTINUED grade 3 UNIT 1 UNIT 2–7 INTRODUCTION TO CASE STUDIES OF A COMMUNITY IN: AFRICA, ASIA, SOUTH AMERICA, THE CARIBBEAN, WORLD GEOGRAPHY AND MIDDLE EAST, EUROPE, SOUTHEAST ASIA, OR AUSTRALIA WORLD COMMUNITIES TEACHER SHOULD SELECT 3-6 WORLD COMMUNITIES TO STUDY THAT REFLECT DIVERSE REGIONS OF THE WORLD September–October November–June Essential Question: What Essential Question: How do culture, history, geography, people, and government shape the development are the important features of a community? of communities through- out the world? • All peoples have beliefs, religion, – development of government – development of government – development of government – development of government traditions 2.1a, 2.1c 5.1a, 5.1c, 5.1e 5.1a, 5.1c, 5.1e 5.1a, 5.1c, 5.1e 5.1a, 5.1c, 5.1e • All peoples provide for their – symbols and national holidays – symbols and national holidays – symbols and national holidays – symbols and national holidays needs in a variety of ways (food, 5.3a 5.3a 5.3a 5.3a clothing) 2.1c, 2.3c, 4.1a – changes over time (family – changes over time (family – changes over time (family – changes over time (family structure, economic system, structure, economic system, structure, economic system, structure, economic system, political system, trade) 4.1e, political system, trade) 4.1e, political system, trade) 4.1e, political system, trade) 4.1e, 4.1f, 4.2 4.1f, 4.2 4.1f, 4.2 4.1f, 4.2 – key events and people in history – key events and people in history – key events and people in history – key events and people in history 2.3b, 2.4a 2.3b, 2.4a 2.3b, 2.4a 2.3b, 2.4a – challenges of current issues and – challenges of current issues and – challenges of current issues and – challenges of current issues and problems 2.2a problems 2.2a problems 2.2a problems 2.2a Information Fluency Continuum – Ask authentic questions – Interpret or explain main idea and support with – Read a variety of fiction and non-fiction – Use prior knowledge to make predictions about evidence for enjoyment and information new information – Use writing process to express new understandings – Participate in discussions and listen well – Select and use appropriate sources to answer questions – Create a product with a beginning, middle, and end – Show respect for the ideas of others – Use at least two sources for research projects – Speak clearly to convey meaning – Work collaboratively – Question text during reading and listening – Select and present creative products in a variety – Credit sources by citing author and title – Use simple note-taking strategies of formats – Draw conclusions about the effects of – Match information found with questions and predictions – Identify and evaluate the important features for a current events good product p. 12
  17. 17. LOCAL HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT grade 4 UNIT 1 UNIT 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 UNIT 5 UNIT 6 NATIVE AMERICANS: THREE WORLDS MEET COLONIAL AND THE NEW NATION GROWTH AND LOCAL AND STATE FIRST INHABITANTS OF REVOLUTIONARY EXPANSION GOVERNMENT NEW YORK STATE PERIODS September–Mid-October Mid-October–November December–January February–Mid-March Mid-March–April May–June Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: How did Native How did three diverse How did the American What does it mean to What was the effect of What is the Americans influence cultures interact and Revolution affect lives be free? industrial growth and relationship between the development of affect each other? in New York? increased immigration governments and New York? on New York? individuals? Geography: Exploration: The 13 Colonies: The Challenge of Industrialization and New York Government: • Location of New York • Reasons for European • The role of geography in Independence: New York: • The branches of New York State in relation to other exploration of the western the establishment of colo- • Role of New York in the • Emergence of New York as State and local government states (countries/world/ hemisphere (gold, alternate nies 3.1a, 3.1b, 3.1c, 3.2a development of the new an economic power 4.1d, (checks and balances, bodies of water) 3.1b, 3.1c, route to China, spices) • Colonists come to the nation 1.1a, 3.2a, 3.2b, 3.2c 4.2b, 4.2c parallels to federal system) 3.1d, 3.2a 4.1c, 4.1f, 4.2c Americas for a variety of Ideas/Ideals About Improvements and inven- 5.1a, 5.2d, 5.2e • Geographic features of New • Major explorers of New economic, political, and re- Freedom: tions in transportation and • The process for electing or York State and New York York State interact with ligious reasons 1.1a, 3.2a, • Foundations for a new gov- communication: appointing government City 3.1a, 3.1c, 3.1d, 3.2a native populations (Henry 4.1e, 5.1d ernment/ideals of Ameri- • The development of steam- officials 5.2d, 5.2e, 5.2f, • Important bodies of water, Hudson, Giovanni da • The New England, Middle, can democracy (Mayflower boat, telegraph 1.1a, 4.1e 5.4 landforms, mountains, etc., Verrazano, and Samuel and Southern colonies have Compact, Declaration of The Constitution: • The Erie Canal joins the of New York 3.1a, 3.1c, de Champlain) 1.1a, 1.3a, distinct characteristics Independence, the United Hudson River and Lake • A plan for organizing 3.1d, 3.1e, 3.2a 1.4a, 1.4c, 2.1a, 2.1c, 2.3a, (social/cultural, political, States and New York Erie 1.3a, 3.1a, 3.1e, 4.1e government 1.1b, 5.1a, • Location of the Iroquois/ 2.4a, 2.4c economic, scientific/tech- State Constitutions) 1.1b, • Provides transportation 5.1c, 5.2a, 5.2c, 5.2d Algonquian territories of • Three worlds interact: nological, religious) 1.1a, 1.3c,1.4a, 1.4b,1.4c, 5.2a, route through New York • Safeguarding individual New York 1.1a, 3.1d, 3.1e, European, African and 1.1c, 1.2a, 1.2b, 1.3a, 1.3b, 5.2b, 5.2c, 5.2d State and to the West 1.3a, liberties 1.1b, 5.1a, 5.1c, 3.2a Native Americans 1.1a, 1.4b, 1.4c The Development of the 1.3b, 3.1a, 3.1e 5.2a, 5.2b, 5.2c, 5.2d 1.4a, 1.4c, 2.1a, 2.1c, 2.3a, • The 13 colonies and First Native Inhabitants Constitution: • Lower shipping costs 4.1d, • A living document 1.1b, 2.4a, 2.4c mercantilism theory 4.1a, of New York State: • The Constitution as a 4.1e 5.1d, 5.2a, 5.2c, 5.2d FOCUS: Case study of 4.1d, 4.1e, 4.1f • Algonquians, Iroquois framework 1.1b, 5.2a, 5.2c • Effect of geography on • Changes and amendments 1.1a, 1.3a, 5.1d early New Amsterdam/ • Colonies furnish England • The Bill of Rights and indi- industrialization 3.1e, 4.1e 1.1b, 5.2c, 5.2a New York: with raw materials 4.1a, • Role of climate, environ- vidual liberties 1.1b, 5.2a Changes in New York: • Consequences of the – Dutch, English and French 4.1c, 4.1e, 4.1f ment, animals, natural • Impact of Peter Zenger de- • Gradual Emancipation absence of government resources in the location influences in New York cision 1.3c, 1.4a, 1.4b, 1.4c Laws 1.1a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.3a, 5.1a, 5.1b, 5.1c and development of Native State 1.1a, 2.1c, 2.3a, 3.1a, 3.1e • Lack of inclusiveness 1.4a, 2.4a, 5.1a, 5.1b American cultures in New (Africans, women, the York State 3.1a, 3.1d, 3.1e poor) 1.1a, 1.4b, 2.4a p. 13
  18. 18. LOCAL HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT CONTINUED grade 4 UNIT 1 UNIT 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 UNIT 5 UNIT 6 NATIVE AMERICANS: THREE WORLDS MEET COLONIAL AND REVO- THE NEW NATION GROWTH AND LOCAL AND STATE FIRST INHABITANTS OF LUTIONARY PERIODS EXPANSION GOVERNMENT NEW YORK STATE September–Mid-October Mid-October–November December–January February–Mid-March Mid-March–April May–June Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: How did Native How did three diverse How did the American What does it mean to What was the effect of What is the Americans influence cultures interact and Revolution affect lives be free? industrial growth and relationship between the development of affect each other? in New York? increased immigration governments and New York? on New York? individuals? FOCUS: Case study of – the establishment of New Life in the New York • Key individuals/groups • Seneca Falls and the • Basic rights/responsibilities a New York State Native Amsterdam by the Dutch Colony: from New York who suffrage movement 1.1a, of citizens to participate in American culture West India Company 3.1a, • Diversity in early New helped strengthen democ- 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.3a, 1.4a, 2.4a, U.S., New York State, and Example: The Lenape 4.1a, 4.1d York (ethnic and religious, racy in the U.S. 1.3c, 5.2e 5.1a, 5.1b local government (voting, – growth of lower Manhattan e.g., Jewish, Swedish, • Individuals and groups • Role of New York City and jury duty, community – belonged to the Algonqui- 1.1a, 1.3b, 2.3a, 3.1a, 4.1f Scottish, German) 1.1a, protected by rights and New York State during the service) 5.1a, 5.1c, 5.1e, an group and populated the – The Dutch West India 1.1c, 1.3a freedom 1.1a, 1.4b, 2.4a, Civil War 1.1a, 1.1b 5.3e, 5.3f, 5.4 lower New York area 1.1a, 1.3a Company brings enslaved • Role of enslaved Africans 5.1c • The Draft Riots 1.1a, 1.1b • Symbols and their mean- Africans to New in growth and development • Individuals and groups not • Migration of freed slaves ings (eagle, flag) 5.3a – villages were usually built on high ground near a river Netherlands 1.1a, 1.3b, of New York 1.1a, 1.3a, protected by rights and following the Civil War • New York City has a or stream 1.3a, 3.1e 1.4a, 2.3a, 2.4a, 4.1f 1.4a, 2.4a freedoms 1.1a, 1.4b, 2.4a, 1.1a, 1.1b, 1.1c, 1.3a, 1.3c, mayor-council form of – key people in early New • Colonial life in New York 5.1c 1.4a, 4.1a. 4.1c., 5.1b government 5.2d, 5.2e, 5.2f – lived in longhouses and wigwams 3.1e York City development before the Revolutionary • Values, practices, and FOCUS: Case study of • The mayor is the city’s (Peter Minuet, Peter War 1.1a, 1.3b, 2.2b traditions that unite all immigration/migration in chief executive 5.2e, 5.2f – fished, harvested crops and Stuyvesant) 1.1a, 1.3a • Social, economic, and Americans 1.1a, 1.1c, 5.3a New York City • The City Council is the hunted 1.1a, 1.3b, 3.1a, 3.1e – the British in New York political conditions of – “The Melting Pot” city’s legislative body, 1.1a, 1.3a, 1.4a, 2.1c, 2.4b diverse New York metaphor 1.1a, 1.4a, 1.4b, making laws for the city – Used slash-and-burn – differences between Brit- communities (Africans, 1.4c 5.2e, 5.2f methods to cultivate soil ish rule of New York and Native Americans, and New York City officials 1.3b, 3.1e – reasons for immigration to Dutch rule 2.1c, 2.4b women) before the war – families were grouped into New York 1.1a, 1.2b, 1.4b, • The members of the City – the British expand the 1.3a, 1.4a, 1.4b, 1.4c, 2.3a, clans descending from the 1.4c, 2.3a, 2.4a Council 5.2e, 5.2f slave trade in New York 4.1a, 4.1d, 5.1d matrilineal side 1.1a, 1.2b, – better living conditions • The public advocate 5.2e, 1.1a, 1.4c, 2.1a, 2.4b, 4.2 • Important accomplish- 1.3a 1.3a, 1.4b 5.2f – interaction between Native ments of individuals and – identified combinations groups living in New York – The Great Irish Potato • The comptroller 4.1e, 4.1f, of two or more clans with Americans, Africans and Famine 1.1a, 1.2b, 1.4b, 5.2e, 5.2f Europeans 1.4a, 3.2a, 4.1d 1.1a, 1.3a, 1.3c animal signs 1.1a, 1.4c 1.4c, 2.3a, 2.4a • The presidents of the five – forced migration 1.1a, 1.4a, – land acquisition 1.3a, 1.4b boroughs 5.2e, 5.2f 1.4c, 2.1a, 2.4b p. 14
  19. 19. LOCAL HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT CONTINUED grade 4 UNIT 1 UNIT 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 UNIT 5 UNIT 6 NATIVE AMERICANS: THREE WORLDS MEET COLONIAL AND REVO- THE NEW NATION GROWTH AND LOCAL AND STATE FIRST INHABITANTS OF LUTIONARY PERIODS EXPANSION GOVERNMENT NEW YORK STATE September–Mid-October Mid-October–November December–January February–Mid-March Mid-March–April May–June Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: How did Native How did three diverse How did the American What does it mean to What was the effect of What is the Americans influence cultures interact and Revolution affect lives be free? industrial growth and relationship between the development of affect each other? in New York? increased immigration governments and New York? on New York? individuals? – assigned land to clans for The American Revolution – financial gain 1.3a, 1.4b their use, not ownership in New York City and – forced migration 1.2a, 1.1a, 1.2b, 1.3a New York State: 1.3a, 1.4b – defined division of labor • The colonists resist – war, politics, religion etc. for men and women 1.1c, British Parliament’s 1.1a, 1.2a, 1.2b, 1.4a, 1.4b 1.2b, 1.3a revenues (Sugar Act, – immigrant experiences in – treatment of elders 1.1c, Stamp Act, Townsend Acts, New York (during travel, 1.2b, 1.3a Tea Act) 1.1a, 1.4a, 4.1a, Ellis Island, life in – leaders (sachems) and 4.1d, 4.1f, 5.1a America) 1.1a, 1.2a, 1.2b, ceremonies 1.1a, 1.2a, • The Declaration of 1.4a, 1.4b 1.3a, 1.3c Independence as key – contributions of immi- – myths and legends 1.1a, document of the American grants (culture, recreation, 1.4c Revolution 1.1b, 5.1a, 5.2b food, language, skills) 1.1a, • Strategic role of New York 1.2b, 1.3a, 1.4a, 2.4a, 4.1b City and New York State in Effects of immigration/ the Revolutionary War migration on New York City (geography, battles, key growth figures, role of Africans, Native Americans, and • Development of new women) 1.1a, 1.4a, 1.3c, buildings 1.1a, 1.3a, 4.1e 3.2a, 3.2c • Mass transportation 1.1a, • The role of the Battle of 1.3a, 4.1e Saratoga 1.4a, 3.1b, 3.2a • Building codes 5.1c, 5.2e, • Key New York City and 5.3e New York State leaders and • Public health laws 5.1c, events of American 5.2e, 5.3e Revolution 1.1a, 1.3a, 1.4a • Modern sewer and water systems 1.3a p. 15
  20. 20. LOCAL HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT CONTINUED grade 4 UNIT 1 UNIT 2 UNIT 3 UNIT 4 UNIT 5 UNIT 6 NATIVE AMERICANS: THREE WORLDS MEET COLONIAL AND REVO- THE NEW NATION GROWTH AND LOCAL AND STATE FIRST INHABITANTS OF LUTIONARY PERIODS EXPANSION GOVERNMENT NEW YORK STATE September–Mid-October Mid-October–November December–January February–Mid-March Mid-March–April May–June Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: Essential Question: How did Native How did three diverse How did the American What does it mean to What was the effect of What is the Americans influence cultures interact and Revolution affect lives be free? industrial growth and relationship between the development of affect each other? in New York? increased immigration governments and New York? on New York? individuals? • Impact of the war on New • Professional fire York City and New York department 1.1a, 1.3a State 3.1d, 4.1d • Social impact of immigration/migration (labor movement and child labor) 1.1a, 1.4a, 1.4b • New York City neighborhoods as ethnic enclaves 1.2a, 1.2b Information Fluency Continuum – Ask authentic questions – Identify facts and details that support main ideas – Select and present creative products in a – Ask questions to clarify topics or details – Note similarities and differences in information from variety of formats – Make predictions or a hypothesis two different sources – Identify and evaluate the important features – Select and use appropriate sources to answer – Use a variety of systems for organizing of a good product questions – Draw conclusions about the main idea – Read a variety of fiction and non-fiction for – Use skim/scan to locate information – Identify point of view enjoyment and information – Distinguish between fact and opinion – Use writing process to express new understandings – Participate in discussions and listen well – Use various note-taking strategies – Draft presentation using an outline – Show respect for the ideas of others – Paraphrase, summarize information – Present idea clearly so that main points are evident – Work collaboratively – Credit sources by citing author and title – Form opinions about current events p. 16

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