Seizure<br />Presentation by:<br />Crishona Battle, SN<br />Angela Funderburk, SN<br />Shanna Helton, SN<br />Krystle Kell...
What is a Seizure?<br />Abnormal, sudden, excessive, uncontrolled electrical discharge of neurons within the brain.<br />R...
Types of Seizures<br />Generalized: involves both hemispheres of the brain.<br />Tonic-clonic: 2-5 minutes, begins with st...
Types of seizures<br />Partial: begin in a part of one cerebral hemisphere.<br />Complex-partial: causes syncope for 1-3 m...
<ul><li>Information regarding a seizure
Pathophysiology and possible causes and risk factors
What the lab values might look like
What to look out for
Patient demographics
Types of medications</li></ul>RN giving SN report on the client admitted with Seizures<br />
Seizure client report<br />
Common Medications for a Seizure<br />Ignatavicius, D., & Workman, L. (2010). Medial-surgical nursing: Patient Centered Co...
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Seizure power point

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nursing student presentation on seizures

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Seizure power point

  1. 1. Seizure<br />Presentation by:<br />Crishona Battle, SN<br />Angela Funderburk, SN<br />Shanna Helton, SN<br />Krystle Kelly, SN<br />George Ndirangu-Kamau, SN<br />Stefanie Smith, SN<br />Elizabeth Snyder, SN<br />
  2. 2. What is a Seizure?<br />Abnormal, sudden, excessive, uncontrolled electrical discharge of neurons within the brain.<br />Results in a change in:<br />Level of consciousness<br />Motor or sensory ability<br />And/or behavior<br />May occur for no reason or may be pathological in nature- resulting from another cause.<br />Epilepsy: is defined by the National Institute of Neurological disorders and stroke as:<br />Two or more seizures experienced by a person.<br />A chronic disorder in which repeated unprovoked seizure activity occurs. <br />Ignatavicius, D., & Workman, L. (2010). Medial-surgical nursing: Patient Centered Collaborative Care (6th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B Saunders.<br />
  3. 3. Types of Seizures<br />Generalized: involves both hemispheres of the brain.<br />Tonic-clonic: 2-5 minutes, begins with stiffening then rhythmic jerking of all extremities.<br />Tonic: abrupt increase in muscle tone, loss of consciousness, & autonomic changes. Lasts 30 seconds- several minutes.<br />Clonic: muscle contraction and relaxation. Lasts several minutes.<br />Absence: brief loss of consciousness that consists of staring and automatisms. Mostly in children, may happen 100+/day.<br />Myoclonic: brief jerking or stiffening of extremities, may be symmetric or asymmetric lasting just a few seconds.<br />Atonic (akinetic): sudden loss of muscle tone causing the person to fall, lasting for seconds, and most resistant to medications.<br />Ignatavicius, D., & Workman, L. (2010). Medial-surgical nursing: Patient Centered Collaborative Care (6th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B Saunders.<br />
  4. 4. Types of seizures<br />Partial: begin in a part of one cerebral hemisphere.<br />Complex-partial: causes syncope for 1-3 minutes- temporal lobe- psychomotor/ temporal lobe seizures. Impairs consciousness; person may wander and have amnesia.<br />Simple-partial: consciousness intact. May experience one sided movement of extremities, unusual sensations, & autonomic changes. <br />Unclassified: occur for no known reason.<br />Primary: not associated with any identifiable brain lesion or other cause. Idiopathic. <br />Secondary: result from underlying brain lesion (tumor/trauma). May be caused by:<br />Metabolic disorders, electrolyte imbalance, high fever, stroke, head injury, substance abuse, & heart disease.<br />Ignatavicius, D., & Workman, L. (2010). Medial-surgical nursing: Patient Centered Collaborative Care (6th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B Saunders.<br />
  5. 5. <ul><li>Information regarding a seizure
  6. 6. Pathophysiology and possible causes and risk factors
  7. 7. What the lab values might look like
  8. 8. What to look out for
  9. 9. Patient demographics
  10. 10. Types of medications</li></ul>RN giving SN report on the client admitted with Seizures<br />
  11. 11. Seizure client report<br />
  12. 12. Common Medications for a Seizure<br />Ignatavicius, D., & Workman, L. (2010). Medial-surgical nursing: Patient Centered Collaborative Care (6th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B Saunders.<br />
  13. 13. <ul><li>Protect patient from injury
  14. 14. Do not force anything into patients mouth.
  15. 15. Turn patient to side to protect airway (prevent aspiration).
  16. 16. Loosen any restrictive clothing.
  17. 17. Maintain airway and suction as needed.
  18. 18. Do not restrain or try to stop the patient’s movement; guide movements is necessary.
  19. 19. Record time seizure began & ended.
  20. 20. At completion of seizure:
  21. 21. Take vital signs
  22. 22. Perform Neuro check
  23. 23. Keep patient on side
  24. 24. Allow patient to rest
  25. 25. Document the seizure.</li></ul>Nursing interventions when a client is having a Seizure<br />Ignatavicius, D., & Workman, L. (2010). Medial-surgical nursing: Patient Centered Collaborative Care (6th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B Saunders.<br />
  26. 26. What to do in the event of a seizure<br />
  27. 27. <ul><li>Importance of taking all meds
  28. 28. Prevent reoccurrence.
  29. 29. Maintenance of therapeutic levels- blood draws.
  30. 30. Do not take any meds unless you talk to your dr. first.
  31. 31. Prevent drug-drug reactions
  32. 32. f/u with Dr./ neurologist.
  33. 33. Wear a medical alert bracelet.
  34. 34. Be sure a family member/ friend is with you at all times.
  35. 35. Be sure family/friends know what to do if you have a seizure.
  36. 36. Do not drive/ operate heavy machinery.
  37. 37. Avoid alcohol and excessive stress.
  38. 38. Home safety examples:
  39. 39. Cook with non-glass wear
  40. 40. Use pre-cut items- avoid knives
  41. 41. No baths, only showers- use a shower chair
  42. 42. Non-skid bath mats.
  43. 43. Keep home free of clutter.</li></ul>D/C Teaching for the client with Seizures…Home safety and health maintenance. <br />Ignatavicius, D., & Workman, L. (2010). Medial-surgical nursing: Patient Centered Collaborative Care (6th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B Saunders.<br />
  44. 44. Seizure D/C teaching<br />
  45. 45. References<br />Ignatavicius, D., & Workman, L. (2010). Medial-surgical nursing: Patient Centered Collaborative Care (6th ed.). Philadelphia: W.B Saunders.<br />We would like to thank 4 Ardmore at Wake Forrest Baptist Medical Center for lending us space to film and being so helpful with our project and clinical rotation. Thank you!!!!<br />
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