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LL Lower Pri D - Gerunds
 

LL Lower Pri D - Gerunds

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    LL Lower Pri D - Gerunds LL Lower Pri D - Gerunds Presentation Transcript

    • Grammar 101 Gerunds
    • Learning Objectives To understand what Gerunds are and to avoid the mistake of interpretating them as verbs. To learn how to use Gerund in a sentence so as to enhance its meaning.
    • Introduction Read the following sentences and say whether they are grammatical or not.1) “She is practising speaking English for her exams next week.”2) “I wonder at his keeping calm.”3) “All I can do is waiting.”Q: Do you think these are grammatical sentences?Hint: They all contain gerunds.
    • IntroductionThe answer for all is a resounding Yes!Some facts about Gerunds:1) They look like verbs with the ing participle.2) Hence, they are also called verbal nouns.3) They can either be the subject or object in a sentence.4) They enhance the meaning of your sentences.We will discuss these in detail.
    • Gerunds = Verbal NounsGerund ends with ing and can act as a sentences subject or object. Hence, gerund is often called a Verbal Noun as it has the form of a verb but functions as a noun. Gerunds as Subjects:1) Swimming helps me to keep fit.2) Reading expands ones horizons.Gerunds as Objects:1) Peter loves jogging.2) Dave loves watching movies.
    • Gerunds and VerbsSince a gerund looks like a verb, it is sometimes confusing telling the two apart. To overcome this, determine whether the ing participle is a modifier to an action (verb) or a subject/object (gerund)Gerunds: Swimming is fun. / I love swimming.Verbs: She is swimming in a public pool. / He was swimming when the skies turned dark.As easily seen, gerunds act as subjects/objects while verbs convey actions (supported by auxiliary verbs is and was in the above examples).
    • Gerunds in actionWith a gerund, the subject/object takes on greater emphasis; the action behind the noun is clearer.1) David accused James of stealing. (gerund)2) David accused James of theft. (noun)1) Its no use regretting past actions. (gerund)2) Its no use to regret past actions. (verb)The difference between using a Gerund (stealing / regretting) and a Noun (theft) or a Verb (to regret) is clear – Gerunds can help readers imagine better as it acts as a Verb AND a Noun!
    • Learning ActivitySpot the Gerunds in this paragraph:Readers of science fiction expect to be exposed to a world different than our own. However, certain physical rules and laws still apply in daily living and working life for a sense of credibility and coherence.
    • Learning Activity AnswersSpot the Gerunds in this paragraph:Readers of science fiction expect to be exposed to a world different than our own. However, certain physical rules and laws still apply in daily living and working life for a sense of credibility and coherence.The Gerunds are living and working.
    • Discussion1) What is a Gerund?2) What are Gerunds used for?
    • In Summary1) Gerunds are verbal nouns and they are able to take on roles as subjects or objects in a sentence.2) As they have the ing suffix – indicating action – they are able communicate the action behind the noun to enliven our sentences.