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Communication For Team Leaders
 

Communication For Team Leaders

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  • Welcome to Communication for Team Leaders. This interactive module will explore verbal and nonverbal communication styles, giving and receiving feedback and how to encourage your team to communicate and excel.

Communication For Team Leaders Communication For Team Leaders Presentation Transcript

  • . Welcome to Communication for Team Leaders!
  • Course Overview
    • You can start or stop the module at any time and come back later
    • Use the navigation buttons to move through the module
    • Print out the Job Aids when prompted to bring with you to the evaluation (last) session
    • Print out the Notes Page now-
    • You can only take the assessment one time, so allow time for it
    • If you have any questions or concerns, call Human Resources at 1-440-483-3000
    Section 1 Elements of Communication Section 2 Effective Communication Section 3 Feedback Section 4 360 ˚ Feedback Section 5 Assessment
  • Elements of Communication Objective One -After successful completion of the training modules, the team leader will be able to classify all elements of communication demonstrated in a post-assessment video. Input . The sender has an intention to communicate with another person. This intention makes up the content of the message. Sender . The sender encodes the message, e.g. the idea of "piece of furniture to sit on" = . Thus he gives expression to the content. Channel . The message is sent via a channel, which can be made of a variety of materials such as air, paper, telephone, cell phone. Noise . The channel is subjected to various sources of noise. Background sound, stained damaged or torn paper, telephone interference, tower interference, (continued on next slide) Section 1 Elements of Communication
  • Elements of Communication Objective One -After successful completion of the training modules, the team leader will be able to classify all elements of communication demonstrated in a post-assessment video. Receiver . The receiver decodes the incoming message, or expression. He or she "translates" it and thus receives output. Output . This is the content decoded by the receiver. (keep in mind it is not always the input the sender intended!) Code . In the process, the relevance of a code becomes obvious: It is the common language of the sender and receiver Section 1 Elements of Communication
  • This is the most widely accepted diagram of the communication process. Section 1 Elements of Communication
  • Sender Channel (Cell phone) Receiver “ I need you to redo the building specifications”- (intent) “ You want me to do John’s job!”- (output) Observe the graphic above and try to apply the previous communication elements listed. Then click on the information icon Section 1 Elements of Communication
  • Sender Role The role of the sender is to: Think of the content to send- Ask yourself- What message do I need delivered? Encode the content using coding that recipient knows- Ask yourself- what is the best language? Is the language the same for my boss as for my 4 year old? Choose appropriate Channel- Ask yourself- What is the best way to communicate this message? Section 1 Elements of Communication After answering the questions on the notes sheet, click the information icon
  • Identify the following elements in this image: The sender, the content or output and the channel. Write it on the Notes Page The Role of the Sender Section 1 Elements of Communication
  • The role of the Receiver The role of the receiver is to Decipher the output - Decode the message received Section 1 Elements of Communication The receiver interprets the content sent.
  • The Role of the Receiver Write your answers on the Notes Page Section 1 Elements of Communication
  • Noise Noise causes interference with this process. Noise can be as subtle as wandering thoughts during a conversation to driving while on the cell phone. Anything that can disrupt the ability of the receiver to properly receive and decode the output is considered noise. Noise or interference is like static on the TV, Sometimes the message still gets through and sometimes the static interferes so much that the TV watcher cannot understand the picture or the audio. Section 1 Elements of Communication
  • Think about this scene. Try to label each item from the elements of communication Section 1 Elements of Communication
  • Let’s see how you did. The elements are displayed above. How did you do? Sender Receiver Channel is air Input and content- we really don’t know but it might be to STOP THAT JACKHAMMERING! Noise - sound of jackhammer Section 1 Elements of Communication Sender
  • What is your interpretation of the communication elements in this scene? Write it on the Notes Page Section 1 Elements of Communication
  • Click on the link on the left side to access the JOB AID to assist you in remembering the various elements of Communication. Bring this to the Evaluation Session. Create link for this screen only to download or print JOB AID FOR ELEMENTS OF COMMUNICATION JOB AID Communication for Team Leaders- Elements of the Communication process Section 1 Elements of Communication Job Aid
  • Identify as many communication elements as you can in the scene above. Section 1 Elements of Communication
  • Effective Communication Effective communication occurs when the content sent by the sender occurs in with an appropriate channel and is decoded accurately by the receiver. Here is one definition of effective communication. We will explore some of the barriers and best practices to ensure better communication among teams. Section 2 Effective Communication
  • There are basically three elements in any face-to-face communication: • words • tone of voice and • body language. These three elements make up the meaning of the message: - Words account for 7% - Tone of voice accounts for 38% and - Body language accounts for 55% of the message. This is known at the 7/38/55 rule (Lee, M. (n.d.) Objective Two - After successful completion of the training modules, the team leader will be able to generate eight rules governing giving and receiving feedback. The team leader will preview list with his or her manager before implementation to the team at the initial team meeting. Section 2 Effective Communication
  • Nonverbal Communication verbal communication nonverbal communication Mixed messages create tension and distrust because the receiver senses that the communicator is hiding something The result is called Mixed Messages A incongruity between the nonverbal and verbal message creates distrust and disbelief. Care should be taken to avoid this happening. Section 2 Effective Communication
  • Types of Nonverbal Communication Visual- these are the things you can see Facial Expression Gestures Eye movement Posture Tactile- the effect of touch Handshake Pat on the back Proximity - invading someone’s space Nonverbal communication can provide valuable clues to whether a message is being received accurately or to the disposition of the receiver to be able to receive a message Section 2 Effective Communication
  • Click on the title to visit University of Southern California’s exploration of nonverbal examples. Write down your own example in each category. Section 2 Effective Communication
  • Improving Nonverbal Communication Skills In order to give and receive constructive feedback, a communicator must first understand and practice good nonverbal communication skills. Section 2 Effective Communication
  • Improving Nonverbal Communication Skills Visual- Eye contact: Direct eye contact creates credibility, interest, concern Section 2 Effective Communication
  • Improving Nonverbal Communication Skills Visual- Facial expression: A genuine smile conveys friendliness, likeability, warmth and approachability. Section 2 Effective Communication
  • Improving Nonverbal Communication Skills Gestures: If you fail to gesture while speaking, you may be perceived as boring, stiff and unanimated. Head nods, a form of gestures, communicate positive reinforcement and indicate that you are listening. Posture and body orientation: You communicate numerous messages by the way you walk, talk, stand and sit. Standing erect, but not rigid, and leaning slightly forward communicates that you are approachable, receptive and friendly. Speaking with your back turned or looking at the floor or ceiling should be avoided; it communicates disinterest. Nodding while listening is positive reinforcement of listening. Posture indicates interest. Section 2 Effective Communication
  • Improving Nonverbal Communication Skills Proximity: Examine the images-what does the body positions and proximity tell you about the communication? Be alert for crossed arms, toe tapping, leaning away and gaze aversion. These are all signs you are too close! Section 2 Effective Communication
  • Feedback Where Does Feedback Fit In? Objective Two -After successful completion of the training modules, the team leader will be able to generate eight rules governing giving and receiving feedback. The team leader will preview list with his or her manager before implementation to the team at the initial team meeting. Feedback is a critical part of effective communication and is the basis for objective two- Section 3 Feedback
    • Evaluative
    • Evaluative feedback makes a judgment about the other person, evaluating worth or goodness. There is a big difference between judging a person and their actions.
      • A personal evaluation judges the whole person and implies that this is a personal and unchangeable attribute. Negative personal evaluation can be very uncomfortable for the other person. Positive personal evaluation, on the other hand, is very flattering.
      • You are not a very nice person. You are a lovely person.
    • Behavioral evaluation judges the action, but not the person. This makes negative evaluation easier for the other person to accept.
      • That was not a very nice thing to do.
    Section 3 Feedback After you have read the information, create an example of evaluative and behavioral evaluation on your Notes Page.
    • Interpretive
    • In interpretive evaluation, you seek to test your understanding of what has been said by interpreting and paraphrasing back to the other person what you think has been said. This is typically followed by a question to allow the other person to agree with your interpretation or offer a correction.
      • So you are interested in joining the club -- is this right?
    • Understanding is not perfect and testing understanding is generally a very good thing to do. It is generally flattering too, as you are showing active interest in what they are saying.
    Section 3 Feedback After you have read the information, create an example of interpretive feedback on your Notes Page.
    • Supportive
    • In supportive evaluation, you seek to support the other person in some way that bolster’s the ego.
      • That was truly awesome! Can you sing it again, please?
      • You look wonderful!
    • With developmental supportive feedback, you seek to help the other person change in some way. This is not always easy, as some criticism may be involved.
      • Your singing is improving. You could try recording it and listening to the opening few notes.
      • Hmm. I think the red dress suits you better.
    • Supportive feedback can be reversed with the deliberate purpose of damaging the other person's ego in a personal attack:
      • That was awful! You should give up singing.
      • You look dreadful.
    Section 3 Feedback After you have read the information, create an example of supportive feedback on your Notes Page.
    • Probing
    • Probing seeks to find more information by asking deeper questions that seek specific information and understanding
      • Could you tell me more about what happened? ... What happened next? ... What size was it? ... Why do you think that happened?
    Section 3 Feedback After you have read the information, create an example of probing feedback on your Notes Page.
    • Understanding
    • You are seeking to understand not just what was said, but the whole person underneath. This asks questions not only shows that you are listening to the person, but also that you truly understand.
      • It sounds like you have personal experience of this. Would you like to talk about it?
    • (Rogers, Carl-Humanist)
    Section 3 Feedback After you have read the information, create an example of understanding on your Notes Page.
    •   Problem oriented-not person oriented " How can we solve this problem?" NOT "Because of you there is a problem." 
    • Congruent, not incongruent "Your behavior really upset me." NOT "Do I seem upset? No, everything's fine." 
    • Descriptive, not Evaluative "Here is what happened; here is my reaction; here is what I suggest that would be more acceptable to me." NOT "You are wrong for doing what you did.“
    •  
    • Validating, Not Invalidating "I have some ideas, but do you have any suggestions." NOT "You wouldn't understand, so we'll do it my way."  
    Section 3 Feedback These are the first 4 keys of effective feedback. How many of these have you heard in the positive form? How many have you used?
    • Specific, not global "You interrupted me three times during the meeting." NOT "You're always trying to get attention.”
    •   Conjunctive, not disjunctive "Relating to what you just said, I'd like to discuss this." NOT "I want to discuss this” (regardless of what you want to discuss)
    • Owned, not disowned "I've decided to turn down your request because..." NOT "You have a pretty good idea, but they just wouldn't approve it." 
    • Supportive Listening, not One-Way Listening "What do you think are the obstacles standing in the way of improvement” NOT  ”As I said before, you make too many mistakes. You're just not doing the job."  
    Section 3 Feedback How many of these can you relate to?
    • Here is an example of a team in conflict. It contains lots of examples of poor feedback.
    • Conflict resolution is a critical part of team interaction and successful management of it is a key to success.
    Section 3 Feedback After viewing the video, click on the information icon and scroll to the Appendix section. Review the 3 sections for tips in conflict resolution.
  • 360 ˚ Feedback 360 ˚ Feedback Supervisor Peers Direct Reports Self Individual Employee The SOLE PURPOSE of this type of feedback is the enhancement of a fellow team member’s capability, character and contribution. Section 4 360˚ Feedback
  • Purpose of the 360 ˚ Feedback Receiver sees how others view his or her actions and performance Giver accepts responsibility to share honest, constructive views of others. Team members who participate in both giving and receiving will grow in honesty, trust, and risk taking and gain skill in clarity of communication. New navigation buttons linking to each objective appear now on the left side of screen on all slides Communication elements link to slide 2 Feedback Skills-link to slide 25 Communication Scenarios Link to this slide Transition in title, then fade in text After reading the purpose, try to determine how the elements of communication relate to this process. This will be discussed during evaluation. Section 4 360˚ Feedback
    • Characteristics of the 360 ˚ Feedback
    • Open and honest information regarding strengths and weaknesses
    • Is used for development not destruction
    • Not part of the evaluation, discipline or compensation process
    • Is confidential to the group
    • Is specific, constructive and BEHAVIOR-FOCUSED
    • Received openly and constructively
    New navigation buttons linking to each objective appear now on the left side of screen on all slides Communication elements link to slide 2 Feedback Skills-link to slide 25 Communication Scenarios Link to this slide Transition in title, then fade in text and graphic It is important for the team leader to realize that feedback information is NOT part of evaluations or assessments and is confidential to the group Section 4 360˚ Feedback
  • How does the 360 ˚ Feedback Process Work? Set the Stage- Explain the purpose of the process-for employee development only Cannot be used in any other employee process Emphasis Confidentiality Have a person experienced with the process speak to the team regarding his or her experience. New navigation buttons linking to each objective appear now on the left side of screen on all slides Communication elements link to slide 2 Feedback Skills-link to slide 25 Communication Scenarios Link to this slide Transition in title, then fade in text. Setting the stage is important so team members get a chance to see what is in it for them and why it is important. This will be done with assistance of management. Section 4 360˚ Feedback
  • How does the 360 ˚ Feedback Process Work? Print out the Feedback Form The form outlines success factors that are common to employees that are successful members of a team or department. Each factor has 4-5 behavioral components that exemplify the factor. These are incorporated into a rating format. Create link to download or print JOB AID 2 FEEDBACK FORM The use of the feedback form is important to the success of initial delivery of feedback. Face to face feedback can be difficult. Download and print the form to discuss during Objective 3 Section 4 360˚ Feedback
  • How does the 360 ˚ Feedback Process Work? Conducting the ratings: Each individual gets to choose who gives his or her feedback, but each group must be represented. Raters receive the feedback form. After completion, the forms are collated electronically to create one summary report. Being a rater can be a daunting task, education about each of the success factors and the associated behavioral characteristics must be provided. Section 4 360˚ Feedback
  • How does the 360 ˚ Feedback Process Work? What happens next? The recipient receives the summary report The recipient then generates a developmental plan based on the feedback in the report. The developmental plan is discussed with the team leader for growth possibilities. The team leader and recipient decide which elements of the plan can be incorporated into the team project and, if necessary, present the new behaviors to the team. The team leader role is critical to the success of implementing the developmental plan. You must learn to display positive nonverbal communication cues. Section 4 360˚ Feedback
  • How does the 360 ˚ Feedback Process Work? By engaging in this ongoing developmental process, all members of the team have the chance to give and receive constructive feedback that provide the keys to improve team function, increase communication, and bolster employee confidence. Section 4 360˚ Feedback
  • Assessment What is the next step? Review all the segments as many times as you need, then take the assessment by clicking on the tab below. You will only be able to take the assessment one time. The results will be part of your onsite evaluation that will occur 4-6 weeks after the assessment. Objective Three will be discussed during the onsite session. Section 5 Assessment Objective Three: After successful completion of the training modules, the team leader will be able to demonstrate during post assessment role-play, a randomly chosen depiction of correctly delivered or received feedback as moderated by the Human Resources staff Click to begin assessment
  • What happens next? What Happens for Objective Three? Objective Three - After successful completion of the training modules, the team leader will be able to demonstrate during post assessment role-play, a randomly chosen depiction of correctly delivered or received feedback as moderated by the Human Resources staff Your manager will approve travel arrangements for you to the training center. Here, you and several colleagues will have moderated discussions about Objectives One and Two, review your assessment results and receive additional education. You will have the opportunity to enact will different scenarios using these tools. At the end of the session, a moderator will pick a roll-play assignment for you to complete Objective Three. As you look around you the next few weeks, try to identify the various elements of communication you experience, observe the nonverbal communication styles around you and identify types of feedback. Be prepared to discuss them during the moderated sessions.
  • Exploring Nonverbal Communication (n.d.) Retrieved May 29, 2008 from http://nonverbal.ucsc.edu/ Hill, L. (1996). Building Effective One-on-One Work Relationships. Harvard Business School Technical Notes , (9).497-028. Retrieved June 9, 2008 from http://web.cba.neu.edu/~ewertheim/interper/feedback.htm Kaminski, S (n.d.) Communication Models. Retrieved May 20, 2008 from http://www.shkaminski.com/Classes/Handouts/Communication%20Models.htm#TheShannonWeaverMathematicalModel1949 Lee, M. (n.d.). Albert Mehrabian quoted in Three elements of communication. Retrieved May 28, 2008 from http://bookmarklee.wordpress.com/2007/01/07/three-elements-of-communication-and-the-so-called-7-38-55-rule/ Ritts, V., and Stein, J., (n.d.) Six ways to improve nonverbal communication. Retrieved May 28, 2008 from http://honolulu.hawaii.edu/intranet/committees/FacDevCom/guidebk/teachtip/commun-1.htm Rogers 5 Feedback Types (n.d.). Retrieved June 9, 2008 from http://changingminds.org/techniques/conversation/reflecting/rogers_feedback.htm Rollo, J. (2001). Performance Management . New York: Goal QPC, References