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COMPARATIVE  ADJECTIVES & ADVERBS * ADJECTIVES  and  ADVERBS  are words that  modify   other words.  * The  COMPARATIVE  f...
<ul><li>To make  comparative  and  superlative  forms of ADJECTIVES some rules must be followed. </li></ul><ul><li>Rule 1 ...
<ul><li>Rule 2   </li></ul><ul><li>To form the  comparative  or  superlative  of  a one syllable word  ending in  “e”  add...
<ul><li>Rule 3  </li></ul><ul><li>To form the  comparative  or  superlative  of  a one syllable word with one vowel and on...
<ul><li>Rule 4  </li></ul><ul><li>To form the  comparative  or  superlative  of a  two syllable word ending in “y” , chang...
Use  most  before the  adjective : most   modern ,  most   interesting ,  most   beautiful  Use  more  before the  adjecti...
<ul><li>Like adjectives  some adverbs  can take  comparative  and  superlative  forms,  </li></ul><ul><li>with  -er  and  ...
<ul><li>However,  the majority  of adverbs  DO NOT  take these endings. Instead, they form the  comparative  using  more  ...
<ul><li>Also, it is important to consider that some adjectives and adverbs have completely irregular  comparative  and  su...
<ul><li>To make stronger the meaning of comparative forms of adjectives and adverbs,  some  INTENSIFIERS  are used. </li><...
<ul><li>In order to make POSITIVE equal comparisons, it is used the expression:  </li></ul><ul><li>“… as …+  adjective / a...
<ul><li>In order to make NEGATIVE comparisons, it is used the expression:  </li></ul><ul><li>“… NOT + VERB +… as …+  adjec...
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Adjectives and adverbs

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Transcript of "Adjectives and adverbs"

  1. 1. COMPARATIVE ADJECTIVES & ADVERBS * ADJECTIVES and ADVERBS are words that modify other words. * The COMPARATIVE form of an adjective or adverb compares two things . * The SUPERLATIVE form of an adjective or adverb compares three or more things .
  2. 2. <ul><li>To make comparative and superlative forms of ADJECTIVES some rules must be followed. </li></ul><ul><li>Rule 1 </li></ul><ul><li>To form the comparative or superlative of one syllable words with more than one vowel OR ending with more than one consonant , add </li></ul><ul><li>-er OR -est. </li></ul><ul><li>tall taller tallest </li></ul><ul><li>neat neater neatest </li></ul><ul><li>deep deeper deepest </li></ul><ul><li>  </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Rule 2 </li></ul><ul><li>To form the comparative or superlative of a one syllable word ending in “e” add </li></ul><ul><li>-r OR -st . </li></ul><ul><li>wid e wider widest </li></ul><ul><li>fin e finer finest </li></ul><ul><li> cut e cuter cutest </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Rule 3 </li></ul><ul><li>To form the comparative or superlative of a one syllable word with one vowel and one consonant at the end, double the consonant, and add -er OR -est . </li></ul><ul><li>sad sadder saddest </li></ul><ul><li>big bigger biggest </li></ul><ul><li>fat fatter fattest </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Rule 4 </li></ul><ul><li>To form the comparative or superlative of a two syllable word ending in “y” , change the “y” to “i”, then add -er OR -est . </li></ul><ul><li>happy happier happiest </li></ul><ul><li>jolly jollier jolliest </li></ul><ul><li>lazy lazier laziest </li></ul><ul><li>Rule 5 </li></ul><ul><li>To form the comparative or superlative of a two syllable word ending a vowel-sound that is not stressed , add -er OR -est . </li></ul><ul><li>yellow yellower yellowest </li></ul><ul><li>simple simpler simplest </li></ul>
  6. 6. Use most before the adjective : most modern , most interesting , most beautiful Use more before the adjective : more modern , more interesting , more beautiful Two syllables or more, not ending in Y. Examples: modern, interesting, beautiful , Add -est: yellow est , simpl est Add -er: yellow er , simple r Two syllable word ending a vowel sound that is not stressed. Examples: yellow, simple Change y to i, then add -est: happ iest , sill iest , lonel iest , joll iest Change y to i, then add -er: happ ier , sill ier , lonel ier , joll ier Two syllables, ending in -Y. Examples: happy, silly, lonely, jolly Double the consonant, and add -est: hot test , big gest , fat test , sad dest Double the consonant, and add -er: hot ter , big ger , fat ter , sad der Only one syllable, with one vowel and one consonant at the end. Examples: hot, big, fat, sad Add -st: wide st , fine st , cute st Add -r: wide r , fine r , cute r Only one syllable, ending in E. Examples: wide, fine, cute Add -est: light est , neat est , fast est , tall est , neat est , deep est Add -er: light er , neat er , fast er , tall er , neat er , deep er Only one syllable, with more than one vowel or more than one consonant at the end. Examples: light, neat, fast, tall, neat, deep SUPERLATIVE COMPARATIVE Adjective form
  7. 7. <ul><li>Like adjectives some adverbs can take comparative and superlative forms, </li></ul><ul><li>with -er and -est :  </li></ul>highest higher high brightest brighter bright earliest earlier early quickest quicker quick slowest slower slow fastest faster fast proudest prouder proud Superlative Comparative Adverb
  8. 8. <ul><li>However, the majority of adverbs DO NOT take these endings. Instead, they form the comparative using more and the superlative using most :     </li></ul>most frequently more frequently frequently most effectively more effectively effectively most recently more recently recently Superlative Comparative Adverb
  9. 9. <ul><li>Also, it is important to consider that some adjectives and adverbs have completely irregular comparative and superlative forms: </li></ul><ul><li>Adjective / Adverb Comparative Superlative </li></ul><ul><li>good / well better best </li></ul><ul><li>bad / badly worse worst </li></ul><ul><li>little less least </li></ul><ul><li>much - many more most </li></ul><ul><li>far further / farther furthest / farthest </li></ul>
  10. 10. <ul><li>To make stronger the meaning of comparative forms of adjectives and adverbs, some INTENSIFIERS are used. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: Joe drives much safer than Carl. </li></ul><ul><li> Ann cooks far more delicious than her sister. </li></ul><ul><li> Tony is a bit older than Michael. </li></ul><ul><li> A BMW is a lot more expensive than a Ford. </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li> Mr. Black speaks English much more fluently than his wife. </li></ul><ul><li> Mrs. White travells far more frequently than Mrs. Green. </li></ul><ul><li> I usually wake up a bit earlier than my sister. </li></ul><ul><li> Final tests are a lot harder than quizes. </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>In order to make POSITIVE equal comparisons, it is used the expression: </li></ul><ul><li>“… as …+ adjective / adverb +… as …” </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li> Joe drives as safe as Carl. </li></ul><ul><li> Ann cooks as delicious as her sister. </li></ul><ul><li> Tony is as old as Michael. </li></ul><ul><li> A BMW is as expensive as a Ford. </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li> Mr. Black speaks English as fluently as his wife. </li></ul><ul><li> Mrs. White travells as frequently as Mrs. Green. </li></ul><ul><li> I usually wake up as early as my sister. </li></ul><ul><li> Final tests are as hard as quizes. </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>In order to make NEGATIVE comparisons, it is used the expression: </li></ul><ul><li>“… NOT + VERB +… as …+ adjective / adverb +… as …” </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li> Joe doesn’t drive as safe as Carl. </li></ul><ul><li> Ann doesn’t cook as delicious as her sister. </li></ul><ul><li> Tony isn’t as old as Michael. </li></ul><ul><li> A BMW isn’t as expensive as a Ford. </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul><ul><li> Mr. Black doesn’t speak English as fluently as his wife. </li></ul><ul><li> Mrs. White doesn’t travell as frequently as Mrs. Green. </li></ul><ul><li> I don’t usually wake up as early as my sister. </li></ul><ul><li> Final tests aren’t as hard as quizes. </li></ul>
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