Website – A Partnership between Parents, Students and Schools
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Website – A Partnership between Parents, Students and Schools

on

  • 503 views

The website developed by the 1.b class at the Augusta Šenoa elementary school is, first and foremost, a pioneering work stemming from cooperation among teachers and parents. The purpose of the ...

The website developed by the 1.b class at the Augusta Šenoa elementary school is, first and foremost, a pioneering work stemming from cooperation among teachers and parents. The purpose of the website is to inform, activate, and involve parents, students and teachers who work in the classroom. Each activity is documented, giving insight into the everyday activities, and making the classroom visible and transparent to everyone. The project uses new technology (forum, gallery of student work, class mail), and enlists a partnership of parents, who made parts of the website.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
503
Views on SlideShare
503
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Website – A Partnership between Parents, Students and Schools Document Transcript

  • 1. From the field Website – A Partnership between Parents, Students and SchoolsAuthor The website developed by the 1.b class at the Augusta Šenoa elementary school is, first and foremost, a pioneering work stemming from cooperation among teachers and par-Sandra Vuk, August ŠenoaElementary School, Zagreb ents. The purpose of the website is to inform, activate, and involve parents, studentsvuksan@gmail.com and teachers who work in the classroom. Each activity is documented, giving insight into the everyday activities, and making the classroom visible and transparent to every- one. The project uses new technology (forum, gallery of student work, class mail), andTags enlists a partnership of parents, who made parts of the website.School website,cooperation, school-familyrelationships, primary school 1. Forms of cooperation between parents and teachers Cooperation between parents and teachers can be divided into three parts: a written form that the teacher presents to the parents, an individual form in which discussions between the teacher and a parent take place, and finally, a group form. Figure 1: Forms of cooperation (breakdown) Advantages and disadvantages of new technologies Advantages: • Speed – all participants save time. Information is received and transmitted fast. A record of emails and communication remains (similar to a paper trail). • It is possible to communicate at any time. You can select the tone of the response. • A quick and inexpensive way of communication. Disadvantages: • Can only transfer short information. No extensive comments. • Not all parents have access to a computer, nor internet access. • Lack of computer literacy on both sides. Irregular checking of email. ing earn eLearning Papers • ISSN: 1887-1542 • www.elearningpapers.eueL ers 30 u ers.e gpap .elea rnin n.º 30 • September 2012Pap www 1
  • 2. From the field2. Website – Classroom website All of the above does not replace the need for live conversations or the necessary presence of parents at individual conferencesThe purpose of launching the website1 was: the ability to gain as needed, parents’ meetings. It does not imply that access toinsight into the everyday happenings in the classroom (student the classroom website as an absolute necessity.and teacher), participation in activities (class projects), control-ling homework, checking the class schedule and calendar, as- I perceive the classroom website as: a communication tool thatsistance in monitoring accessories, and faster communication allows students to express their thoughts and ideas, as an op-between parents and teachers. Additionally, the website helped portunity to apply what they learned, as well as the ability tofamiliarize the student’s family with their projects - art2 and lit- encourage creative expression and eloquence in the use of lan-erary works. The website would also serve the purpose of allow- guage.ing the students’ successes to be shared with others and there We (parents and teacher) decided to use technology that is ap-would be a faster flow of information. propriate for our generation - the computer (connected to the1 https://sites.google.com/site/senoa1b/ Internet). Creative educational ideas have lasting value, if they2 https://picasaweb.google.com/nasrazred.b proceed in a creative way. Through the process of making a classFigure 2: The classroom website’s homepage ing earn eLearning Papers • ISSN: 1887-1542 • www.elearningpapers.eu eL ers 30 u ers.e gpap .elea rnin n.º 30 • September 2012 Pap www 2
  • 3. From the fieldFigure 3: The classroom’s photo gallerywebsite parents approached it jointly and creatively (consider- I consider it important to note that all of the activities that wereing that most parents are IT educated). Published posts and ad- implemented and were accompanied on the class website wereditional Croatian language materials helped me to better meet an integral part of the teaching process. In fact, the connectionstudents’ interests, effectively evaluate their progress, and I between the teaching process and the publication of resultswould send the best ones to various children’s contests. gives meaning and vitality to the idea of classroom websites.Displaying the children’s artwork in the photo gallery enablesstudents to experience the joy of creation, but also to see the 2.1 The website’s contentresults of their creativity. Their creativity grows wider in social The website and it’s appearance depends upon which providermeaning. By publishing projects on the classroom website, the of free website building services is selected. In our case I chosechildren received feedback in the form of comments from peo- Google Sites3, as one of the strongest providers of services (1GBple who have visited their site. 3 www.google.com ing earn eLearning Papers • ISSN: 1887-1542 • www.elearningpapers.eu eL ers 30 u ers.e gpap .elea rnin n.º 30 • September 2012 Pap www 3
  • 4. From the fieldFigure 4: A project example and it’s appearance on the websiteof storage for documents, 1GB of space for web pages and con- listed. It should be noted that it was because of parents’ initia-tent, 1GB of space for a photo gallery, and 1 GB of space for tive that a forum4 was opened for both parents and teachers.email). With regards to the biggest success as a result of the forum, IThe class website is divided into the following major sections: can mention the project A Healthy Diet, which was fully agreedour events, our class, classes and calendar, notices and news upon, planned, and conducted on the forum, while the part ofreleases, letters, and entertainment. Each section was continu- the project that incorporated real food was implemented in theously updated with content throughout the 2010-2011 school classroom.year, accompanied by all the events that the class participated The website menu is located on the left hand side. Those whoin. develop their own classroom website can choose to have theLooking at the analysis of website traffic, the most visited partof the website was a subpage where the daily homework was 4 http://prvasici.forumcroatian.com ing earn eLearning Papers • ISSN: 1887-1542 • www.elearningpapers.eu eL ers 30 u ers.e gpap .elea rnin n.º 30 • September 2012 Pap www 4
  • 5. From the fieldmenu located in a different spot as well as the material and top- 4. Conclusionics that will be published on the site. Personally, for me, this period of two years that I am editing and creating classroom websites is interesting, sometimes hard, but3. Website security and participants very nice and exciting. The hardest part for me was opening theGoogle provides its users the option to view visitor statistics, door to my classroom and “baring” my teaching to the world,measure retention time on the site, and who and what was showing everyone the beautiful and somewhat sad side of ourdownloaded (taken off) from the site, etc. business (equipment, layout, classrooms, water buckets instead of a sink, etc.) and be present every day on the Internet. The teacher in the teaching process is alone, he or she does not have anyone with whom to share their good or bad ex- periences. Through discussions on the forum, I received feedback that was not superficial like the casual and brief conversations usually held in the staff room. These substantive suggestions from par- ents, other teachers, friends who encour- aged me to think and didn’t leave me indif-Figure 5: Google Analytics ferent, but encour- aged me to changeImages of the students were taken during “Carnival” and are my classes, myself and introduce new ways of teaching, accept-displayed on the website. Photos of students’ activities (field ing a network connection as part of everyday life, making thework, field trips, birthdays) are published with the consent of most out of what the website could provide.parents (signed) and students are not named for privacy rea- The website led to new friendships with teachers from aroundsons. If unusual activity is noticed in the photo gallery, albums the world, these connections proved to be one of the most im-are locked and parents receive a password via email. Three par- portant characteristics in the recognition of teachers, regardlessent meetings (workshops) were held on network security and of language. Such that at this time we are collaborating withhow students should use computers. Indian teacher Unmesh Inamdar; with Chiu-Chu, an American professor at the University of Michigan, exchanging artwork, discussing ways of education, displaying pictures of projects and so on. ing earn eLearning Papers • ISSN: 1887-1542 • www.elearningpapers.eu eL ers 30 u ers.e gpap .elea rnin n.º 30 • September 2012 Pap www 5
  • 6. From the fieldLiteratureZloković, J., Dečman-Dobrnjič, O. (2008). Children at risk– the responsibility of families, schools and society. Zagreb:HPKZ.Zloković, J. (1998), School failure - the problem of students,parents and teachers. Ri-jeka: Faculty of Philosophy.Bašić, J. i dr. (1994), Integral methods in working with chil-dren and their parents, Zagreb: Alinea.Edition and productionName of the publication: eLearning Papers CopyrightsISSN: 1887-1542 The texts published in this journal, unless otherwise indicated, are subjectPublisher: elearningeuropa.info to a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-NoDerivativeWorksEdited by: P.A.U. Education, S.L. 3.0 Unported licence. They may be copied, distributed and broadcast pro-Postal address: c/Muntaner 262, 3r, 08021 Barcelona (Spain) vided that the author and the e-journal that publishes them, eLearningPhone: +34 933 670 400 Papers, are cited. Commercial use and derivative works are not permitted.Email: editorial@elearningeuropa.info The full licence can be consulted on http://creativecommons.org/licens-Internet: www.elearningpapers.eu es/by-nc-nd/3.0/ ing earn eLearning Papers • ISSN: 1887-1542 • www.elearningpapers.eueL ers 30 u ers.e gpap .elea rnin n.º 30 • September 2012Pap www 6