Instructional Design Models and Theories: Gestalt Theory

13,253 views
14,696 views

Published on

Join us at the Instructional Design History Journey. A New Instructional Design Model Will Be Added Every Week! Find more at: http://elearningindustry.com/instructional-design-models-and-theories

1922 – Max Wertheimer, Kurt Koffka and Wolfgang Köhler introduce Gestalt Theory. Check the following article and presentation to find more. If you are interested to learn more about Classical Conditioning Theory please check: http://elearningindustry.com/gestalt-theory

Last but not least, you are more than welcome to embed the Gestalt Theory presentation at your site of blog.

Published in: Education, Technology
2 Comments
12 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Very interesting that the picture used for Wertheimer's escape from Germany is actually a different "Max Wertheimer" than the inventor of Gestalt Psychology! To find this other Max, (1863-1941), a messianic Rabbi, see http://www.messianic-torah-truth-seeker.org/Scriptures/Wertheimer-Rabbi.htm
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Join us at the Instructional Design History Journey. A New Instructional Design Model Will Be Added Every Week!
    Find more at: http://elearningindustry.com/instructional-design-models-and-theories

    If you are interested to learn more about Gestalt Theory please check: http://elearningindustry.com/gestalt-theory

    Last but not least, you are more than welcome to embed the Gestalt Theory presentation at your site of blog.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
13,253
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9,401
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
2
Likes
12
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Instructional Design Models and Theories: Gestalt Theory

  1. 1. Instructional Design Models and Theories Gestalt Theory
  2. 2. Christopher Pappas Founder of the eLearning Industry's Network elearningindustry.com •eLearning Consultant and Analyst in various USA and EU organizations. •eLearning Blogger at eLearningIndustry.com •M.B.A. & M.Ed. from BGSU, Ohio, USA. If I can be valauable to you do not hesitate to contact me •https://www.linkedin.com/in/christopherpappas •https://plus.google.com/u/0/+ChristopherPappas/posts •https://twitter.com/cpappas •https://www.facebook.com/christoforos.pappas
  3. 3. Instructional Design Models and Theories Join us at the Instructional Design History Journey A New Instructional Design Model Will Be Added Every Week! Find more at: Instructional Design Models and Theories http://elearningindustry.com/instructional-design-models-and-theories
  4. 4. 1922 – Max Wertheimer, Kurt Koffka and Wolfgang Köhler introduce Gestalt Psychology.
  5. 5. Objectives Gestalt Theory • Who are the founder of Gestalt Psychology •What is the Gestalt Theory • Which are theLaws of Organization • Which are the Principles of Gestalt Theory in Learning
  6. 6. Section 1 The Founders of Gestalt Psychology
  7. 7. Max Wertheimer • Max Wertheimer was born in Prague in 1880. After obtaining his Ph.D. from the University of Würzburg in 1904, he taught at several universities in Germany. He eventually ended up teaching at the New School for Social Research in New York, where he remained until his death in 1943. He is one of the 3 founders of Gestalt Psychology.
  8. 8. Wolfgang Köhler • Wolfgang Köhler was born in Estonia in 1887 and was an eminent psychologist and phenomenologist. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Berlin in 1909. He met Wertheimer and Koffka at the University of Frankfurt. In the 1930s he emigrated to the United States and became a professor at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania until his death in 1967.
  9. 9. Kurt Koffka • Kurt Koffka was born in Berlin in 1886. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Berlin in 1908. In 1927, after emigrating to the US, he became a professor at Smith College in Massachusetts. He had a great interest in the laws that govern the human perception of the environment, as well as in interpretation and developmental psychology. He died in 1941.
  10. 10. Section 2 The Gestalt Theory
  11. 11. The Gestalt Theory According to the Gestalt Theory, which is commonly known as the Law of Simplicity, every stimulus is perceived by humans in its “most simple form”. The main focus of the theory is “grouping” and the entire theory emphasizes on the fact that the whole of anything is greater than the sum of its parts. Besides, “gestalt” in German means the “shape of an entity’s complete form”. Thus, the operational principle of the brain is holistic and has a self-organizing inclination.
  12. 12. Section 3 The Laws of Organization
  13. 13. The 4 Laws of Organization 1. Proximity Elements are typically grouped together based on their immediacy. 2. Similarity Elements in our environment, which are similar to one another, tend to be grouped together. 3. Closure Elements are typically grouped together if they are a part of an entity. 4. Simplicity Elements should be organized into simplistic figures, based on their symmetry, smoothness and regularity.
  14. 14. Section 4 ThePrinciples of Gestalt Theory in Learning
  15. 15. The Principles of Gestalt Theory in Learning 1. Teachers should encourage their students to discover the relationship of the elements that make up a problem. 2. Incongruities, gaps, or disturbances are essential stimuli in the learning process for a student. 3. Educational instruction should be based on the Laws of Organization.
  16. 16. GestaltTheory Find more at: Gestalt Theory
  17. 17. Free eLearning Resources Top 10 e-Learning Statistics for 2014 You Need To Know http://elearningindustry.com/top-10-e-learning-statistics-for-2014-you-need-to-know Awesome e-Learning Course Guide http://elearningindustry.com/awesome-e-learning-course-guide The Free eBook: How to become an eLearning Professional http://elearningindustry.com/the-free-ebook-how-to-become-an-elearning-professional Over 1000 Free eLearning Resources http://elearningindustry.com/over-1000-free-elearning-resources

×