(Hand)Made By Machine Printing Project
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(Hand)Made By Machine Printing Project

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(Hand)Made By Machine: Silk Screen Printing Pattern Design Project

(Hand)Made By Machine: Silk Screen Printing Pattern Design Project

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  • The term 'handmade' conjures up an air of romance; however anything prefixed with the term 'machine-made' immediately suggests an (artefact) object which has been made by a cold, indifferent machine...but is this true? Lasercutters, CNC mills, 3D printers and even sewing machines are all electronic tools (machines) for creating— these are now commonplace tools used by the modern craftsman.
  • Since the Industrial Revolution the 'craft fraternity' have heard alarm bells ringing whenever they are introduced to a new form of manufacturing technology. Common claims are that 'they' can do things better, and that ultimately technology will kill off the 'hands-on' human touch that are the hallmarks of attention-to-detail and true quality craftsmanship.
  • The Industrial Revolution propelled economies world-wide, but William Morris, the father of the Arts & Crafts Movement, was keenly aware of its drawbacks— division of labour in factory production which meant that workers performed mind-numbing, repetitive tasks their whole lives, beginning in childhood, for very low wages. Urbanisation which meant dreadful living conditions in crowded slums; and aesthetically, products of the Industrial Revolution were generally badly produced, cheap and unimaginative imitations of historical styles. However Morris wasn't against progress, he saw the Industrial Revolution as causing a separation between manual labour and brainwork, designer and creator.
  • However Morris wasn't against progress, he saw the Industrial Revolution as causing a separation between manual labour and brainwork, designer and creator.
  • Realistically, the boom in 'handmade' craft can tell us that maybe we are not all simply lazy slaves to the convenience of technology and machines. There is a middle ground between technology and traditional craft, that can produce exciting and original product possibilities. In a new era of The Digital Artisan, the digital world (technology) and traditional craft can co-exist; in fact, there is no reason why artisans (and designers) cannot embrace the latest technological advancements, to create beautifully designed artefacts facilitated by a modern process— leading to more original, (more sustainable), and more bespoke design collections.
  • My works arise from observations of daily life: small events at home, street images, actions and traditions. I walk around them and examine them from all possible perspectives. My favourite materials, my muse, are objects that are so self-evident that they are overlooked. I lift them out of the shadows and place them in the light, so that their hidden meaning becomes visible. Each object is a bearer of stories and symbols. The smallest things contain great themes. A nail is a sign of hope and desire and a photocopied bunch of flowers depicts the same transitoriness as a seventeenth-century painting. By working with common utensils I can unite the small with the great and thus create a connection between today and the past. This process of observation, analysis and re-interpretation takes shape in the form of images and objects which, due to their individual stories, are definitely not self-evident. Born 1979 • 2006 - 2008 / Sandberg Instituut / Vrije Vormgeving / Amsterdam / MA diploma • 2008 / Fotoacademie / cursus digitale fotografie / Amsterdam • 2003 - 2006 / Gerrit Rietveld Academie / TxT textiel / Amsterdam / BA diploma • 2001 - 2003 / Hogeschool van de Kunsten / Theatervormgeving / Utrecht / propedeuse
  • Table Bouquet, Nienke Sybrandy— In my attempt to immortalize flowers, I often put a bouquet on the copier at the supermarket. From 3D to 2D by one push on the button. The pile of black and white copies in my workshop grew. Designs created by photocopying flowers. The older the copier, the more grains and stamp, the more abstract the design. From some copies I made a weft. The bouquet that once stood on the table now is the basis for a another bouquet.
  • Photocopied flowers , Nienke Sybrandy— In my attempt to immortalize flowers (a constant movement in art history) I made a series of photocopies at the supermarket situated between the florist's and my home. The series works as a diary; the photocopies say something about the season and about the choice I made that day.
  • Woonbeurs in Amsterdam 2012 / café Classic, Nienke Sybrandy— For the 20th edition of the Woonbeurs in Amsterdam I was asked to design the dessins for the decoration of cafe Classic. Drink tea with an Alice in Wonderland experience, like you shrink with every sip and the flowers around you grow bigger and bigger.
  • Nienke Sybrandy's apartment
  • Nienke Sybrandy's apartment
  • Anne ten Donkelaar, born 1979 Graduated in 2007 at the 'Utrecht school of The Art' (NL) direction "3D Product Design" A damaged butterfly, a broken twig, a bumblebee, some strangely grown weeds: I find all these unique discoveries in my path and then take them home to my studio. Here, I take my time to explore the objects and try to work out how I can show each one to it's best advantage. My finds inspire me. While looking at them I can invent my own stories about their existence and their lives. By protecting these precious pieces under glass, I give the objects a second life and hope to inspire people to make up their own stories about them.
  • Broken butterflies, Anne Ten Donkelaar (2011) The book 'The Butterfly Workshop’ by Gioconda Belli was an inspiration for the restored butterflies. This children’s book is about a character called Arno, one of the ‘designers of all things’ who secretly wants to create something that is as beautiful as a flower and can fly like a bird. Arno works in a space where butterflies are designed and made, and this idea of a utilitarian workspace for beautiful creatures really appealed to my imagination. I had my own collection of damaged butterflies, so I decided to repair each one differently according to their needs. So in a way, I now have my own workplace with butterflies and give the butterflies a second life. I design body parts and give the insects new names, names that reveal something about their recovery. For example the The 'Blauw spinner' looked like it had died the moment it hatched from its cocoon. This lead me to me make the body from a twig wrapped with blue thread. A few threads are still hanging loose , almost as though the butterfly is slowly unwinding and breaking free from its cocoon.
  • Flower constructions, Anne Ten Donkelaar (2011-2012) Imagine a big bang, a firework of flower seeds thrown into space. What would happen? New fragile flowers arise, new flower planets start evolving, planets where no one has ever been. These detailed landscapes seem to be elevated so you can walk through them. Weeds become poetry, each unique twig gets attention, nature seems to float. Flower constructions are 3d collages from pressed flowers and cut out flower pictures. Each element is meticulously placed on pins which creates the depth. Some of them are like a fantasy Herbaria, filled with dried flowers or branches, with irregular shapes and sophisticated twists and some refer to planets.
  • Flower constructions, Anne Ten Donkelaar (2011-2012) Imagine a big bang, a firework of flower seeds thrown into space. What would happen? New fragile flowers arise, new flower planets start evolving, planets where no one has ever been. These detailed landscapes seem to be elevated so you can walk through them. Weeds become poetry, each unique twig gets attention, nature seems to float. Flower constructions are 3d collages from pressed flowers and cut out flower pictures. Each element is meticulously placed on pins which creates the depth. Some of them are like a fantasy Herbaria, filled with dried flowers or branches, with irregular shapes and sophisticated twists and some refer to planets.
  • Flower constructions, Anne Ten Donkelaar (2011-2012) Imagine a big bang, a firework of flower seeds thrown into space. What would happen? New fragile flowers arise, new flower planets start evolving, planets where no one has ever been. These detailed landscapes seem to be elevated so you can walk through them. Weeds become poetry, each unique twig gets attention, nature seems to float. Flower constructions are 3d collages from pressed flowers and cut out flower pictures. Each element is meticulously placed on pins which creates the depth. Some of them are like a fantasy Herbaria, filled with dried flowers or branches, with irregular shapes and sophisticated twists and some refer to planets.
  • Flower constructions, Anne Ten Donkelaar (2011-2012) Imagine a big bang, a firework of flower seeds thrown into space. What would happen? New fragile flowers arise, new flower planets start evolving, planets where no one has ever been. These detailed landscapes seem to be elevated so you can walk through them. Weeds become poetry, each unique twig gets attention, nature seems to float. Flower constructions are 3d collages from pressed flowers and cut out flower pictures. Each element is meticulously placed on pins which creates the depth. Some of them are like a fantasy Herbaria, filled with dried flowers or branches, with irregular shapes and sophisticated twists and some refer to planets.
  • Flower constructions, Anne Ten Donkelaar (2011-2012) Imagine a big bang, a firework of flower seeds thrown into space. What would happen? New fragile flowers arise, new flower planets start evolving, planets where no one has ever been. These detailed landscapes seem to be elevated so you can walk through them. Weeds become poetry, each unique twig gets attention, nature seems to float. Flower constructions are 3d collages from pressed flowers and cut out flower pictures. Each element is meticulously placed on pins which creates the depth. Some of them are like a fantasy Herbaria, filled with dried flowers or branches, with irregular shapes and sophisticated twists and some refer to planets.
  • Travels, Anne Ten Donkelaar (2007) The necklace symbolizes the roads I travelled; I was always moving, like a nomad. The atlas you can read like a picture diary of that period.
  • Artist, decorator, and textile designer Carolyn Quartermaine works from her various studios in London, Belgium, and southern France creating hand printed designs using artisan methods. The only child of an English businessman and Swiss mother, she spent a rather solitary childhood on the move, attending some 15 schools and living in France and Holland. 'I suppose that could be disastrous for some children,' reflects Quartermaine, 'but I think it was a good way to toughen up. You adapt to any situation, any location, any person. It also means you change but you keep key things to yourself, building on what you like most, on what your strengths are, and you always take those with you.'
  • Script, Carolyn Quartermaine
  • Fresh Collection
  • Andy Warhol, Electric Chair, 1964. Silkscreen on canvas. The two screenprints Electric Chair I and Electric Chair II (90.2x121.9 cm, 1971) belong to the series American Death. They are an example of the period in Andy Warhol's work when disasters in the USA - suicides, car accidents, etc. - attracted his interest. It is difficult to say whether this was an expression of his protest, a mere pose or a phenomenon he just took a fancy to.
  • In Marilyn Monroe, Warhol found a fusion of two of his consistent themes: death and the cult of celebrity. The star died tragically in August 1962. In the following two years, Warhol made thirty silkscreen paintings of her, always using the same publicityphotograph from the 1953 film Niagara. This set of ten screenprints was produced in 1967, in an edition of 250. The repeated image serves as the basis for a series of startling colour transformations.
  • Warhol's art encompassed many forms of media, including hand drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, silk screening, sculpture, film, and music. He was also a pioneer in computer-generated art using Amiga computers that were introduced in 1985, two years before his death. He founded Interview Magazine and was the author of numerous books, including The Philosophy of Andy Warhol and Popism: The Warhol Sixties. He is also notable as a gay man who lived openly as such before the gay liberation movement. His studio, The Factory, was a famous gathering place that brought together distinguished intellectuals, drag queens, playwrights, Bohemian street people, Hollywood celebrities, and wealthy patrons. Warhol has been the subject of numerous retrospective exhibitions, books, and feature and documentary films. He coined the widely used expression "15 minutes of fame". Many of his creations are very collectible and highly valuable. The highest price ever paid for a Warhol painting is US$100 million for a 1963 canvas titled Eight Elvises. The private transaction was reported in a 2009 article in The Economist, which described Warhol as the "bellwether of the art market". Warhol's works include some of the most expensive paintings ever sold.
  • Andy Warhol, Electric Chair, 1964. Silkscreen on canvas. He produced Electric Chair in 1964, amidst America’s grapple with the morality of the death penalty. The two screenprints Electric Chair I and Electric Chair II (90.2x121.9 cm, 1971) belong to the series American Death. They are an example of the period in Andy Warhol's work when disasters in the USA - suicides, car accidents, etc. - attracted his interest. It is difficult to say whether this was an expression of his protest, a mere pose or a phenomenon he just took a fancy to. New York banned the electric chair in 1963. Out of commission, New York’s infamous executioner, rested barren in Sing Sing prison; an ominous candidate perfectly suited for Andy Warhol’s ‘Death and Destruction’ series. From his emergence as a Pop Artist in 1962, until his death in 1987, Andy Warhol’s quirks and mantras contributed to his iconic status in the contemporary art world. Warhol demonstrated his unique fervor for repeated banality in his silkscreen prints. Electric Chair, one of fifteen or so versions, depicts disturbing subject matter. Light emanates from the chair itself, positioned centrally. Dramatic, dark shadows separate against the furthest wall, creating a clearing against which the protagonist sits. A closed black door disrupts the continuum of the back wall above which the austere “silence” sign stares back at you. Warhol situates the viewer in the isolation of the observation gallery. Silence. The neon yellow background stained with black ink creates an image of commemoration.
  • “Sixteen Jackies” Andy Warhol loved politics just as much as the blond bombshells and the Hollywood beauties.. His much complex and striking 1964 painting of First Lady, Jacqueline Kennedy through the turmoil of her husband, John F Kennedy’s assignation. Warhol’s multiple image repetition painting, the paintings are set in backgrounds of blues, white and a very rare gold hue.
  • Andy Warhol The Death and Disaster Series

(Hand)Made By Machine Printing Project (Hand)Made By Machine Printing Project Presentation Transcript

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