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Deviant Typography Project
 

Deviant Typography Project

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Typography, Creative Typography Project, Teaching Material, Eleanor-Jayne Browne, Graphic Design, MVC

Typography, Creative Typography Project, Teaching Material, Eleanor-Jayne Browne, Graphic Design, MVC

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  • Peter Greenaway, CBE (born 5 April 1942) is a British film director born in Wales. At an early age Greenaway decided on becoming a painter. He became interested in European cinema, focusing first on that of Bergman, and then on French Nouvelle Vague film-makers such as Godard, and most especially Resnais. In 1962 Greenaway began studies at Walthamstow College of Art, where a fellow student was musician Ian Dury (later cast in The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover). Greenaway trained as a muralist for three years; he made his first film, Death of Sentiment, a churchyard furniture essay filmed in four large London cemeteries. In 1965, he joined the Central Office of Information (COI), working there fifteen years as a film editor and director. In that time he created a filmography of experimental films, starting with Train (1966), footage of the last steam trains at Waterloo station, (situated behind the COI), edited to a musique concrete track. Tree (1966), is an homage to the embattled tree growing in concrete outside the Royal Festival Hall on the South Bank in London. By the 1970s he was confident and ambitious and made Vertical Features Remake and A Walk Through H. The former is an examination of variations of arithmetical editing structure, and the latter is a journey through the maps of a fictitious country. The visual hallmark of Greenaway's cinema is the heavy influence of Renaissance painting, and Flemish painting in particular, notably in scenic composition and illumination and the concomitant contrasts of costume and nudity, nature and architecture, furniture and people, sexual pleasure and painful death. Greenaway's frequent musical collaborator composer is Michael Nyman, who has scored several of his films. In 1980, Greenaway delivered The Falls (his first feature-length film) – a mammoth, fantastical, absurdist encyclopedia of flight-associated material all relating to ninety-two victims of what is referred to as the Violent Unknown Event (VUE). In the 1980s, Greenaway's cinema flowered in his best-known films, The Draughtsman's Contract (1982), A Zed & Two Noughts (1985), The Belly of an Architect (1987), Drowning by Numbers (1988), and his most successful (and controversial) film, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover (1989).
  • Peter Greenaway, CBE (born 5 April 1942) is a British film director born in Wales. At an early age Greenaway decided on becoming a painter. He became interested in European cinema, focusing first on that of Bergman, and then on French Nouvelle Vague film-makers such as Godard, and most especially Resnais. In 1962 Greenaway began studies at Walthamstow College of Art, where a fellow student was musician Ian Dury (later cast in The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover). Greenaway trained as a muralist for three years; he made his first film, Death of Sentiment, a churchyard furniture essay filmed in four large London cemeteries. In 1965, he joined the Central Office of Information (COI), working there fifteen years as a film editor and director. In that time he created a filmography of experimental films, starting with Train (1966), footage of the last steam trains at Waterloo station, (situated behind the COI), edited to a musique concrete track. Tree (1966), is an homage to the embattled tree growing in concrete outside the Royal Festival Hall on the South Bank in London. By the 1970s he was confident and ambitious and made Vertical Features Remake and A Walk Through H. The former is an examination of variations of arithmetical editing structure, and the latter is a journey through the maps of a fictitious country. The visual hallmark of Greenaway's cinema is the heavy influence of Renaissance painting, and Flemish painting in particular, notably in scenic composition and illumination and the concomitant contrasts of costume and nudity, nature and architecture, furniture and people, sexual pleasure and painful death. Greenaway's frequent musical collaborator composer is Michael Nyman, who has scored several of his films. In 1980, Greenaway delivered The Falls (his first feature-length film) – a mammoth, fantastical, absurdist encyclopedia of flight-associated material all relating to ninety-two victims of what is referred to as the Violent Unknown Event (VUE). In the 1980s, Greenaway's cinema flowered in his best-known films, The Draughtsman's Contract (1982), A Zed & Two Noughts (1985), The Belly of an Architect (1987), Drowning by Numbers (1988), and his most successful (and controversial) film, The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover (1989).
  • insert movie clip http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=fJTVKTubrt0 The battered wife of a loathsome gangster has an affair with a man she meets at her husband's high-class restaurant, with gruesome consequences. English gangster Albert Spica (Michael Gambon) has taken over the high-class La Hollandaise Restaurant, run by French chef Richard Borst (Richard Bohringer). Spica makes nightly appearances at the restaurant with his retinue of thugs. His oafish behavior causes frequent confrontations with the staff and other diners. Forced to accompany Spica is his reluctant wife, Georgina (Helen Mirren), who soon catches the eye of a quiet regular at the restaurant, bookshop owner Michael (Alan Howard). Beneath her husband's eye, Georgina carries out an affair with Michael with the help of the restaurant staff. Ultimately Spica learns of the affair, forcing Georgina to hide out at Michael's bookshop. Borst sends food to Georgina through his young employee, a boy soprano who sings while working. Spica force-feeds the boy his own buttons until he reveals Georgina's location. Spica's men storm Michael's bookshop while she is away and torture him to death by force-feeding him pages from his books. Georgina discovers his body when she returns. Overcome with rage and grief, she begs Borst to cook Michael's body, and he eventually complies. Together with all the people that Spica has wronged throughout the film, Georgina confronts her husband at the restaurant and forces him to eat Michael's cooked body. Spica complies, gagging, before Georgina shoots him in the head.
  • insert movie clip http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=JnmIHCMw6go The plot centres on twin brothers, Oswald and Oliver Deuce, whose wives are killed in a car accident. The brothers enter a relationship with Alba Bewick, the driver of the car, who lost one of her legs in the accident. In an attempt to fathom the reason for their wives' death they become obsessed with decay, making numerous time-lapse films of decaying animals. Culminating in the ultimate experiment, A Zed & Two Noughts is not one of Greenaway's more accessible works. It features a memorable soundtrack by Michael Nyman.
  • David Keith Lynch (born January 20, 1946) is an American director, screenwriter, producer, painter, cartoonist, composer, video and performance artist. Lynch has received three Academy Award nominations for Best Director, for The Elephant Man (1980),[1] Blue Velvet (1986),[2] and Mulholland Drive (2001).[3] Lynch has won awards at the Cannes Film Festival and Venice Film Festival. Over a lengthy career, Lynch has employed a distinctive and unorthodox approach to narrative film making (dubbed Lynchian), which has become instantly recognizable to many audiences and critics worldwide. Lynch's films are known for surreal, nightmarish and dreamlike images and meticulously crafted sound design. Lynch's work often explores the seedy underside of "Small Town U.S." (particularly Blue Velvet and Twin Peaks), or sprawling California metropolises (Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive and his latest release, Inland Empire). Beginning with his experimental film school feature Eraserhead (1977), he has maintained a strong cult following despite inconsistent commercial success.
  • insert wild at heart movie Lula's psychopathic mother goes crazy at the thought of Lula being with Sailor, who just got free from jail. Ignoring Sailor's probation, they set out for California. However their mother hires a killer to hunt down Sailor. Unaware of this, the two enjoy their journey and themselves being together... until they witness a young woman dying after a car accident - a bad omen.
  • insert movie Eraserhead is an American surrealist-horror film written and directed by David Lynch, and released in 1977. The film is set in a slum in the heart of an industrial center. It is rife with urban decay, rundown factories, and a soundtrack composed almost exclusively of the noises of machinery. Henry Spencer (Jack Nance) is a printer who is "on vacation." At the start of the film, Henry, who has not heard from his girlfriend, Mary X (Charlotte Stewart) for a while, mistakenly believes that she has ended their relationship. He is invited to have dinner with Mary and her parents at their house. Briefly we see Mary's catatonic grandmother in the kitchen. Mrs. X mixes the salad with the grandmother's hands. At the dinner table the conversation is obviously strained and awkward. They are having artificial chicken for dinner, which promptly starts to twitch and emit a large amount of blood through its rear end when Henry attempts to carve it up. They stare at it in shock, then the two women burst into tears and leave the room. After the failed meal Henry learns that Mary has just had a baby after an abnormally short pregnancy. Henry is then obliged to marry her. In 1971, Lynch moved to Los Angeles to study for an MFA (Masters of Fine Arts) degree at the AFI Conservatory. At the Conservatory, Lynch began working on his first feature-length film, Eraserhead, using a $10,000 grant from the AFI. The grant did not provide enough money to complete the film and, due to lack of a sufficient budget, Eraserhead was filmed intermittently until 1977. Lynch used money from friends and family, including boyhood friend Jack Fisk, a production designer and the husband of actress Sissy Spacek, and even took a paper route to finish it. A stark and enigmatic film, Eraserhead tells the story of a quiet young man (Jack Nance) living in an industrial wasteland, whose girlfriend gives birth to a constantly crying mutant baby. Lynch has referred to Eraserhead as "my Philadelphia story", meaning it reflects all of the dangerous and fearful elements he encountered while studying and living in Philadelphia.[8] He said "this feeling left its traces deep down inside me. And when it came out again, it became Eraserhead". The final film was initially judged to be almost unreleasable, but thanks to the efforts of The Elgin Theatre distributor Ben Barenholtz, it became an instant cult classic and was a staple of midnight movie showings for the next decade. It was also a critical success, launching Lynch to the forefront of avant-garde filmmaking. Stanley Kubrick said that it was one of his all-time favorite films.[9][10] It cemented the team of actors and technicians who would continue to define the texture of his work for years to come, including cinematographer Frederick Elmes, sound designer Alan Splet, and actor Jack Nance.

Deviant Typography Project Deviant Typography Project Presentation Transcript

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