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Case Studies 1: Presentation Styles—Three Ways To Deliver A Message
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Case Studies 1: Presentation Styles—Three Ways To Deliver A Message

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Case Studies 1: Presentation Styles—Three Ways To Deliver A Message. Please note accompanying teaching notes are not included and remain the intellectual property of Eleanor-Jayne Browne.

Case Studies 1: Presentation Styles—Three Ways To Deliver A Message. Please note accompanying teaching notes are not included and remain the intellectual property of Eleanor-Jayne Browne.

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  • Arthur Elgort for Vogue UK,1971. Frida Kahlo.
  • Speak in a measured pace with pauses: authoritative speech is generally more measured than the pace we use to chat. A fast-paced talker can give the impression of nervousness, (breathing will be shallow, shoulders and face muscles will probably look slightly tense). Slowing your speaking pace will help you relax, give you time to think and give your listener time to take in what you saying. Speaking in a measured pace can help us appear confident
  • Body weight is evenly balanced and you stand with good posture. Hands are at the sides. The ready position is not the most exciting stance but it accomplishes one of the most difficult parts of successful delivery: control over the body. Being able to control the body and stand in the ready position is the first step towards having great body language.
  • Gesture big. When you are on stage speaking, the whole stage is yours, so act like you own it. Keep your gestures above your waist. Relax your shoulders and gesture with your ENTIRE ARM, rather than gluing your elbow to your side or penguin flapping with your hands at your side. Gesture meaningfully. Each gesture you make should have a distinct purpose. Avoid distracting mannerisms (playing with change, fidgeting, etc.). When not gesturing, keep your hands at your side and in the ready position.
  • Humour is a powerful tool that can be developed and incorporated into speeches and presentations. It can help to form a bond, or rapport, with the audience, make them relax and break the ice; it can also ease tension when responding to a hostile question.
  • Because humour creates an emotional response the audience will retain information longer, and increase the chance that they will act upon the delivered material.
  • Humour can also act as a re-framing tool by helping audiences to see old ideas in new ways. As a method to manage nerves, humour can also boost confidence and keep the speaker relaxed— the more relaxed the speaker, the more relaxed (and engaged) the audience.
  • Whilst humour can add credibility,humour and jokes are not the same.Humour is found within the context of a presentation whilst jokes invite an on-demand response from listeners— a speaker who successfully uses humour demonstrates confidence and being in control, however it must be natural, a speaker is not a comedian, and 'how much' humour is appropriate should always be gauged.
  • of a presentation whilst jokes invite an on-demand response from listeners— a speaker who successfully uses humour demonstrates confidence and being in control, however it must be natural, a speaker is not a comedian, and 'how much' humour is appropriate should always be gauged.
  • Based on Gore's lecture tour on the topic of global warming, his book elaborates upon points offered in the film and brings together leading research from top scientists around the world; charts, photographs and other illustrations; and personal anecdotes and observations which document the fast pace and wide scope of global warming.
  • Known as agenda—setting, the function of informative speaking is to raise attention to topics in order to highlight their importance; and when captivated, audiences will engage in active listening— giving undivided attention in a genuine effort to understand the speaker's message.
  • To deliver a great informative speech, speakers must appeal to audiences' emotions, with an argument grounded in logic. Often audiences begin by thinking: “So what?” therefore there is a need to establish, at an early stage, that the topic has a link to their own experiences and is worthy of attention.
  • The focus on an agenda—setting speech is communicating information. Vivid detail, descriptions and definitions all help to make complex topics easy to understand, thus the use of visual aids to give audiences a visual representation of important information, contained in the speech, is common (and mandatory).
  • Providing information in multiple forms during the speech increases the likelihood that the audience will retain the information included in the speech.
  • Conclusion requires clever logical and psychological closure— an artful summary, reconnection of the topic to a larger context and reminding audiences how the topic affects them— the call for action is overt and specific.