Yunis01

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Rhetorical analysis of a text for a course on rhetorical theory and history.

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Yunis01

  1. 1. Written Texts and the Rise of Literate Culture in Ancient Greece Lisa Eldred AL 805 Rhetorical Analysis 11/27/06
  2. 2. Table of Contents <ul><li>Why Written Texts? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Harvey Yunis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>From Letters to Literature </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Andrew Ford </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Writing Religion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Albert Henrichs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Letters of the Law </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Michael Gagarin </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Writing, Law, and Legal Practice in the Athens Courts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>David Cohen </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Literacy and the Charlatan in Ancient Greek Medicine </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Lesley Dean-Jones </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Literacy in Chinese and Greek Science </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Geoffrey Lloyd </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Writing Philosophy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Charles H. Kahn </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Prose Performance Texts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rosalind Thomas </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Writing for Reading </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Harvey Yunis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reflecting on Writing and Culture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Richard Hunter </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Context <ul><li>“Written Text and Transformations of Thought and Expression in Classical Greece”—April 2000, Rice University, Houston, Texas </li></ul><ul><li>Follow-up gathering at Rice in November 2001 to fashion book out of 10 papers </li></ul><ul><li>Eric Havelock: Literacy responsible for the development of abstract and analytical thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on understanding the effect of writing on specific cultural practices </li></ul>
  4. 4. The Role of Audience <ul><li>The present performer </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sappho </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Homer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shakespeare </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The absent author </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Thucydides </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Herodotus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plato </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reader Response Theory </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Performative Texts <ul><li>Links between performance and religion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Literacy and the gods </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Mystery Cults </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Religious festivals </li></ul></ul><ul><li> : Graffiti and the earliest writing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Memory aides (poetry) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Loss of context </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Shift in interpretation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inscriptions and dedications </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Writing the Law <ul><li>Early Legal Procedures </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Muses and the King </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mnamon, the rememberer </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Solon’s laws </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The polis and public discourse of laws </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nicomachus and the sacrificial laws </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Practical Applications of the Law </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Untrustworthiness of the deme registries </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Inheritance Laws </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Commercial Courts and specializations </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Science and Specializations <ul><li>Medicine </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Literacy and the “examination of causes” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical education: text and practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical texts and audience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pupils </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dosages </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Mathematics </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The overall aim: “axiomatic-deductive proofs” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Euclid’s invisibility </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Philosophical Prose <ul><li>Treatises </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Popularized for the quasi-literate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Works and Days </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Sophists </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Writing for  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dissemination of works </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Notes on textual preservation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Time and record of composition </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hesiod and Homer vs. Anaximander </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Mistrust of Rhetor <ul><li>Texts were largely unreliable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>External substantiation necessary </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Through word </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Through deed </li></ul></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Creating the Author <ul><li>Thucydides </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Specifically writes to be read </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research is “superior” to those other writers of history (i.e. Herodotus) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Seeking permanency </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Meanings change for each generation (intentionally) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Plato </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Socrates and poets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Socratic dialogue </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Some Cross-Cultural Comparisons <ul><li>“We shall certainly not be in a position to appreciate the differences literacy makes in a given society at a given period until we have some idea about the answers to questions [about differences in context]. To get a sense of those differences, we need, ideally, to take a range of different societies and periods into account: we need, in fact, a comparative approach.” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Geoffrey Lloyd (122) </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Literacy Across Cultures <ul><li>Ancient Chinese rhetoric </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Persuade the ruler, not the people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Career-oriented schooling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ find the guiding principles […] that unify different areas of mathematics” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Mexica </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Preserved codices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spirituality and Anzaldúa </li></ul></ul><ul><li>West Africa </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Griots </li></ul></ul>

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