Digital Game-Based Learning in Businesses: 8 (+2) Case Studies

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  • 1. Digital Game-Based Learning in Business: 8 ( +2) Case Studies Lisa Eldred TC 831 9/11/08
  • 2. Overview
    • Games in business are used
      • For training employees
      • For educating customers
      • For educating suppliers (no game examples yet)
  • 3. 1) The Aspirin Trivia Game
    • Simple, 5-question HTML-based quiz
      • Questions neither easy nor obvious
      • Users invited to find out more
    • What makes this a game?
      • Context
      • Trivia a popular game form
      • Lack of compulsion
      • Questions to engage and educate, not test
  • 4. 2) The “We’ll Pay Your Taxes” Game
    • Build interest in new premium tax service from H&R block
    • E-mail based game through Yoyodine (now part of Yahoo!)
      • 10-week long trivia game for $25,000 of taxes paid by H&R block
    • Survey: 54% of regular responders got right answer to multiple-choice question on Premium Tax service
  • 5. 3) Time Out!
    • Developed by Boston Consulting Group to help explain how to streamline production to clients
    • Time Out!—presents a fictional firm and all procedures/paperwork with no “right” answers
      • Team-based problem solving
        • Question workers at fictional company, evaluate data
        • “ It compresses the case team process from 4 months down to 3 hours” (p. 233)
    • Designed to be easily updatable
  • 6. 4) Darwin
    • Developed by Ameritrade (democratizers of personal investment)
      • Train online customers who were trading stocks but losing money
      • Appeal to MBA students (future customers)
        • Many also gamers
      • Try to simulate the mania of the trading pit
  • 7. 5) HEDGEManager and HEDGEFund
    • Created by Bankers Trust
      • 2 spreadsheet-based games
        • Run high risk company
        • Run high risk hedge fund
        • Who can produce highest return while taking least risk
        • Team-based game
      • Used for both training and recruitment
  • 8. 6) Dobutrex Dosage Game
    • Drug company advertising to doctors
    • Prescribe right amount of drug to patients
      • Patient either dies, recovers, or stays somewhere in between
      • Affects behavior of doctors (determination to save life, albeit fictional)
  • 9. 7) Giraffe
    • Developed by Palm Pilot
      • Training for standardized handwriting-recognition software called “Graffiti”
      • Letters fall from top of screen, players have to write letter legibly before it falls to bottom of screen
        • Trains reflexes as well as handwriting
  • 10. 8) The Monkey Wrench Conspiracy
    • Designed by games2train and think3 to teach engineers on thinkdesign , a 3-D modeling system to replace AutoCAD
      • Quake-style game
      • Player has to rebuild various things (i.e. a broken trigger for a gun) using thinkdesign in order to move on in game
    • Used as both training for engineers and marketing for engineering students (demo version a magazine insert)
  • 11. Some conclusions…
    • Corporate games designed for clients serve multiple purposes
      • Informing
      • Training
      • Marketing
      • Teaching collaboration
      • Streamlining processes
      • Affect player’s behavior
  • 12. 9) Dungeons & Dragons: Tiny Adventures
    • Facebook application by Wizards of the Coast
      • Advertise D&D 4 th Edition
    • Goal: Get character to level 11
      • Pick a character
      • Send on mission
      • Gain loot and experience from random encounters
      • Buff and/or heal friends
  • 13.  
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  • 17. D&D:TA Effectiveness
    • “ Die” rolls in encounters accurate
    • Skill enhancement bonuses accurate in theory if not practice
    • 8 playable characters reasonable representations
    • Very limited options
    • Not very collaborative
    • Anecdotal evidence that more players pick up D&D: TA because of interest in D&D than become interested in D&D because of D&D: TA.
  • 18. In Comparison…
    • Informing - yes
    • Training - no
    • Marketing – yes in terms of design, but no data available
    • Teaching collaboration – not as well as actual D&D
    • Streamlining processes – yes/no
    • Affect player’s behavior – probably not
  • 19. 10) Don’t Be Bob
    • Advertising game by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan for young adult health insurance
    • Web site with several interactive elements, including 2 games
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  • 26. Don’t Be Bob Effectiveness
    • Highly unlikely to be zapped by aliens (or even stung by bees hidden in store-bought flowers)
    • Accidents happen
    • Accidents are money-drains
    • Health insurance functions as a shield for the bank account
  • 27. In Comparison…
    • Informing - no
    • Training - no
    • Marketing – yes, but no data
    • Teaching collaboration - no
    • Streamlining processes - no
    • Affect player’s behavior – yes, but no data
  • 28. Final Thoughts
    • Making a marketing game enjoyable does not by default make it effective
    • Corporate games ought to fulfill several functions
      • Arguably, for marketing, changing consumer behavior is the most important function
        • Be careful about how you’re changing consumer behavior (e.g. Scrabulous)
  • 29. References
    • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan. (2007). Don’t Be Bob . Available: http:// www.dontbebob.com/default.asp
    • Prensky, M. (2001). Digital Game-Based Learning . St. Paul: Paragon House.
    • Wizard of the Coast. (2008). Dungeons & Dragons: Tiny Adventures . Available: http://www.new.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=23415053320