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  • The Early Learning Challenge is about systems change. It is not about program expansion: it’s about improving, linking, and aligning programs and services to lead to increased access to high quality experiences for vulnerable children. The ELC creates an incentive that will lead to increased gubernatorial leadership for 0-5 systems. FROM THE FEDERAL GUIDANCE- USE AS COMMENTARY: Federal Perspective (from the guidance) Does not: create new early learning and development program maintain the status quo Does: support integration & alignment of all early learning and development resources & policies across all State agencies provide incentives to support high-quality early learning and development programs statewide.
  • If this were just about dollars, it wouldn’t be a victory. We have lost federal dollars in early childhood…as have most budget areas…The victory is the federal acknowledgment and investment in changing the game. This is something EC funders have sought for more than a decade: federal funding that invests in systemic change and infrastructure development to create and fuel a system over time. Potential to transform educational opportunities for our youngest children—and those most at risk Not just a little more money for one program or another, but a chance to redesign, rethink, plan, and build the necessary infrastructure for quality, access and sustainability. Supports states’ focus on quality as a basis for public investment is a critical role for the Challenge. Helps states strengthen infrastructure for quality early childhood education including standards, assessment, and data systems. Quality Rating and Improvement Systems can provide a mechanism for defining and supporting quality and accountability. By linking a professional development system to QRIS we help build an effective, high quality workforce.
  • http://www.heckmanequation.org/ has extensive backgrounders and videos if you need more information to bolster these points.
  • As a state, presence of assertive leadership coherent organizational structure entrepreneurial commitment to high quality intentional focus on high-needs children commitment to systems that provide high-quality programs and services THIS IS ALSO A GOOD PLACE TO PUT IN YOUR MISSION STATEMENT IF YOU HAVE ONE.
  • You may delete the funding levels except for your own state, if you wish.
  • If you would like, use this section to explain how the application will be scored: Our application must address the absolute priority throughout our application in order to receive funding. We’ll go into deeper details on all of these during the presentation, but this chart outlines the points available for each area we must address in our application. We’ll also have the opportunity to gain extra points by addressing competitive priorities.
  • This competition has an absolutely priority, meaning that our state must address it throughout our entire application. As we look at the next slides, we can see the rest of the requirement that will show us how we will start to address this, within the context of our own vision of course!
  • We must address each of these five areas in our application: successful state systems, high-quality, accountable programs, promoting early learning and development outcomes for children, a great early childhood education workforce, and measuring outcomes and progress. The federal government calls these areas “focal points” and “selection criteria.”
  • We must address Successful State Systems in our application and we must address each of the four items to do so.
  • In Area 2, we must address all five elements that are included by the Challenge. Let’s go through them.
  • Programs that should participate include those funded by Title I, CCDF, state preschool, Head Start/Early Head Start, and IDEA Parts B/619 and C.
  • In Area 3, we must address at least two of the four items and can address all of them. We have to provide our rationale for our choice here. “ High-quality early learning and development standards” are defined as a set of guidelines describing what children should know and be able to do.
  • In Area 4, we can address either one or both of two elements.
  • In Area 5, we can address either one or both of two elements.
  • There are two competitive priorities. Either- here is how we are thinking about them now. Or, what do you think about addressing these? We get extra points for addressing competitive priorities- 10 points for each competitive priority for a total of 20 extra. The grand total of points available for the full application is 300.
  • Invitational priorities will not be scored, but they are of interest to the Departments of Education and Health and Human Services.
  • Add additional slides as necessary to outline your perspective on how you will proceed
  • Insert state contact and follow up information for your state here, as relevant.
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Value of the RTT-Early Learning Challenge Name of state here
    • 2. Overview of Today’s Discussion
      • What is the Early Learning Challenge?
      • Our Vision: the Early Learning Challenge
      • How it Works
      • Our Process and Our Approach
      • The Bottom Line
    • 3. I. What is the Early Learning Challenge?
    • 4. What is the Early Learning Challenge?
      • A voluntary federal initiative that helps states build more efficient and effective early learning systems for infants, toddlers, and preschoolers—and their families
      • Not about program expansion
      • Focuses on improving, linking, & aligning
      • Honors gubernatorial leadership
    • 5. What is the Early Learning Challenge? Quality as Basis for Public Investment
            • Addresses needs of the most vulnerable children
      • Strengthens infrastructure: standards, assessment, data systems
      • Supports quality and accountability through Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS)
      • Builds a quality workforce by linking professional development to QRIS
    • 6. II. Our Vision: the Early Learning Challenge
    • 7. Our Vision: Why Quality Early Learning Matters
        • Produces better education, health, family and economic outcomes
        • Is key to increasing school readiness, academic achievement, college graduation, good citizenship and a productive workforce
        • Helps states get the most out of investments in education, health, public safety and economic development—helping to reduce deficits through better outcomes and greater productivity
    • 8. Our Vision: Early Learning Challenge
      • Vision of what it takes
        • Assertive leadership
        • Coherent organizational structure
        • Commitment to high quality
        • Focus on high-needs children
        • Commitment to develop needed systems
    • 9. Our Vision: Early Learning Challenge
      • Insert state mission or vision statement here
    • 10. III. How it Works
    • 11. How It Works
      • States compete for the Early Learning Challenge
      • The federal government, through the US Departments of Education and Health and Human Services, sets competition guidelines
      • States are free to creatively build early learning systems that best meet the needs of local families and communities
      • Challenge funds can supplement but not supplant
    • 12. How It Works: Timeline and Funding Levels
      • Grant period : December 31, 2011 to December 31, 2015
      • Funding Levels : (based on population of low-income young children)
        • Up to $100 million CA, FL, NY, TX
        • Up to $70 million AZ, GA, IL, MI, NC, OH, PA
        • Up to $60 million AL, CO, IN, KY, LA, MO, NJ, OK, PR, SC, TN, VA, WA, WI
        • Up to $50 million AK, AR, CT, DE, DC, HI, ID, IA, KS, ME, MD, MA, MN, MS, MT, NE, NH, NM, NV, ND, OR, RI, SD, UT, VT, WV, WY
      • Timeline : Applications due October 19, 2011
      • Total Funding Available for the Challenge : $500 million
    • 13. How it Works: Priorities, Requirements, & Selection Criteria Early Learning Challenge Points Overview Points Available Percentage 1. Successful State Systems 65 23 2. High-Quality, Accountable Systems 75 27 3. Promoting Early Learning & Development Outcomes for Children 60 21 4. A Great Early Childhood Education Workforce 40 14 5. Measuring Outcomes and Progress 40 14 Total points available for selection criteria 280 100 Competitive Priority 1: Including all early learning & development programs in the QRIS 10 Competitive Priority 2: Understanding status of learning & development at Kindergarten entry 10 Grand Total 300
    • 14. How it Works Absolute Priority: Promoting school readiness for children with high needs
      • Our state must address this in our application
      • Definition: States must build systems that increase the quality of early learning and development programs for children with high needs so they enter kindergarten prepared, by integrating and aligning resources and policies
        • across participating State agencies AND
        • designing and implementing a common, statewide tiered quality rating and improvement system (QRIS)
    • 15. How It Works: Five Areas Must be Addressed
      • Successful State Systems
      • High-Quality, Accountable Programs
      • Promoting Early Learning and Development Outcomes for Children
      • A Great Early Childhood Education Workforce
      • Measuring Outcomes and Progress
    • 16. Area 1: Successful State Systems
      • Demonstrate past commitment to early learning and development through
        • financial investments
        • participation of children with high needs
        • legislation, policies, or practices
        • current work in standards, assessments, family engagement, workforce, and data practices
      • Articulate the State's rationale for its reform agenda and goals for improving program quality and child outcomes
    • 17. Area 1: Successful State Systems
      • 3. Align and coordinate early learning and development across the state through a governance structure that includes interagency integration and broad stakeholder engagement.
      • 4 . Develop a budget that shows how federal, state, local, and private resources (including CCDF quality dollars) align with, supplement, support, and sustain the plan.
    • 18. Area 2: High-Quality, Accountable Programs
      • Develop and adopt a tiered QRIS based on common program standards , including:
        • early learning standards
        • a comprehensive assessment system
        • educator qualifications
        • family engagement
        • health promotion
        • effective data practices
        • linkages to state licensing
    • 19. Area 2: High-Quality, Accountable Programs
      • 2. Promote participation in the QRIS , with goals of having all publicly-funded programs—including state and federal programs—participate at an increasing rate.
      • 3. Rate and monitor programs using valid tools, trained monitors, and sufficient frequency. Make ratings readily available and easy to understand.
    • 20. Area 2: High-Quality, Accountable Programs
      • 4. Promote access to high-quality programs through
        • continuous program improvement through training, technical assistance, financial rewards or incentives, etc.
        • support for working families to meet their needs for full day/full year transportation, meals, and family support services
        • setting targets for increasing top tier programs and their enrollment of children with high needs
      • 5. Validate the QRIS by showing that tiers are linked to levels of program quality and linking changes in ratings to progress for children’s learning outcomes, using an independent evaluator.
    • 21. Area 3: Promoting Early Learning and Development Outcomes for Children
      • Develop and use statewide, high-quality early learning and development standards across programs for infants, toddlers, & preschoolers that
        • are developmentally, linguistically, and culturally appropriate
        • cover domains of language and literacy, cognition, approaches to learning, physical, and social and emotional development.
        • Incorporate these standards into program standards, curricula, assessments, workforce competencies, and professional development; and align them with K-3 standards.
    • 22. Area 3: Promoting Early Learning and Development Outcomes for Children
      • 2. Support effective uses of comprehensive assessment systems that include
        • screening measures
        • formative assessments
        • measures of environmental quality
        • measures of adult child interactions.
        • Educate programs and train providers on purposes, uses, and interpretations of assessment systems.
    • 23. Area 3: Promoting Early Learning and Development Outcomes for Children
      • 3. Address health, behavioral, and developmental needs by establishing program standards for screening and follow-up and training and supporting providers to meet those standards.
      • 4. Engage and support families by including family engagement in program standards, training providers in family engagement strategies, and leveraging home visiting programs and other existing resources to promote family support.
    • 24. Area 4: A Great Early Childhood Education Workforce
      • Develop a common, statewide workforce knowledge and competency framework —expectations for what educators should know and be able to do—that
          • promotes learning and improved child outcomes
          • develops a common, statewide progression of credentials and degrees
          • engages higher education and professional development providers.
    • 25. Area 4: A Great Early Childhood Education Workforce
      • Use the framework to support educators by providing professional development and implementing policies and incentives that promote professional improvement and advancement. Publicly report data on educators and set targets for increasing alignment with postsecondary institutions and professional development providers and increasing the number and percentage of educators who progress to higher level credentials.
    • 26. Area 5: Measuring Outcomes and Progress
      • Administer a common, statewide kindergarten entry assessment that
        • is aligned with early learning standards
        • covers all essential domains of school readiness
        • is valid, reliable, and appropriate for all children
        • is reported to statewide data systems
        • is implemented by the 2014-15 school year
        • is funded, in significant part, with federal or state resources other than those available under this grant.
    • 27. Area 5: Measuring Outcomes and Progress
      • Build or enhance an early learning data system that
        • has all of the essential data elements :
          • unique child identifier or other accurate method to link data on child
          • a unique statewide educator identifier
          • child and family demographic information
          • educator demographic information
          • program-level data
          • child-level program participation and attendance data
        • enables uniform data collection and exchange
        • generates timely, relevant, and accessible information for programs and educators.
    • 28. Competitive Priorities
      • Two competitive priorities bring extra points:
      • Including all early learning and development programs in the QRIS : States are encouraged to have all licensed or regulated programs participate in the QRIS and to extend licensing and inspection requirements to otherwise non-regulated programs.
    • 29. Competitive Priorities
      • Understanding the status of children's learning and development at kindergarten entry: States are encouraged to implement kindergarten entry assessments that
        • align with early learning and development standards
        • cover all essential domains of school readiness (language and literacy development, cognition and general knowledge, approaches toward learning, physical well-being and motor development, and social and emotional development)
        • are valid, reliable, and appropriate for the target population.
    • 30. Invitational Priorities
      • Two invitational priorities, but no points:
      • Sustaining program effects in the early elementary grades: States can work to align K-3 standards with early learning standards; ensure transition planning; promote health and family engagement; increase the percentage of children who are on grade-level in reading and math ability by third grade; and leverage existing Federal, State, and local resources.
      • Encouraging private sector support: States can show private sector financial and in-kind support.
    • 31. IV. Our Process and Our Approach
    • 32. For more information:

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