Time allowed: Preparation time + 10 hour exam
(Controlled Conditions)
Instructions
•Read the paper carefully. Before you s...
Information
•Your work will be marked out of 80.
• All your work, including the work done during the preparatory period, w...
Your work will be marked according to how well
you have shown evidence of:
AO1
Developing ideas through investigations inf...
Openings such as doors and windows are important parts of
the composition in some of the photographic work of Lee
Friedlan...
Lee Friedlander American, b. 1934
Andreas Gursky

Paris, Montparnasse, 1993
White Cube

Hong Kong Shanghai Bank
1994 C-print 220 x 170
cm 86½ x 67"
Dragan Todrovic
Inge Morath collaborated with the artist Saul Steinberg to
produce a series of photographs in a book called
‘Masquerade’. ...
Inge Morath & Saul
Steinberg

USA. Untitled. (from the Mask
Series with Saul Steinberg), 1959.
Photograph by Inge Morath
Richard Burbridge
Artists of the Futurist Movement sometimes used
photography and film making to celebrate the energy, speed
of change, tech...
Futurist Imagery

Polyphysiognomical Portrait of Umberto
Bocciono’,
Anton and Arturo Bragaglia (1913)

Portrait of Marinet...
Natalya Goncharova, The Cyclist (1913)

Umberto Boccioni, Unique Forms of
Continuity in Space (1913)
Laura Letinsky uses the edges of objects such as tables
and shelves and the line where one colour meets another
as importa...
Jed Devine

Jed Devine
The White Jug (ca. 1984)
Jan Groover

‘Untitled’ 1987

NY Times Obituary
Laura Letinsky

Laura Letinsky's photo for an
article on fruit gelatin desserts
in Martha Stewart Living.
Untitled, #3, Ha...
Untitled #23, 2009
Chromogenic Print

Untitled #34, 2001
Chromogenic Print

After All

After All
The London Festival of Photography defines Street
Photography as, ‘ …un-posed, un-staged, photography
which captures, expl...
YouTube links
Henri Cartier Bresson & other
examples
PES (real name Adam Pesapane) is an animator and
director who uses the distinctive textures and colours of
objects and mat...
PES (Adam Pesapane)
Edward Weston

Pepper 1929

Edward Weston (1948 film) YouTube
Ansel Adams

Images from Adams’ ‘Yosemite
National Park ‘ series
You should make connections with appropriate selected
sources when developing your personal response to one of
the followi...
Webology & Resources
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

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
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

Friedlander
Dragan Todorovic
Inge Morath & Saul
Steinberg
Richard Burbridge
About...
BishopLuffa GCSE photography exam support 2014
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BishopLuffa GCSE photography exam support 2014

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  • Fly on the wall – the American way of life – often tongue in cheek seeing humourous juxtapositions
  • Gursky interested in both vast scale and the mundane – his images often of the everyday but, because he casts an overview, patterns and abstact ideas emerge. Could be seen as existential metaphor? Collectivism rather than individuality.
  • Fashion photographer who pictures models with outlandish masks – obscuring beauty, changing perception, questioning protocols of fashion imagery
  • Futurists early 20thC Italian Art movement. Interested in their Modern Society with its emphasis upon factory manufacture/machinery, speed, noise and War (WW1). Early experimenters with photography.
  • It could be argued that the invention of photography freed artists from strictly representational Art and, without it,some images, such as these, would have been unlikely. Photography informed Futurist Art.
  • Form defined by tone
  • The late photographer Jan Groover's work belongs to the type known as  formalism,  wherein the relationships between objects are implied through their formal properties. The older and more familiar Pictorialist photography told stories deliberately.    Paradoxically, Groover's concentration on the formal properties of objects  resulted not in dryness but rather in a rich visual experience.   Like Daniel Boudinet in France, Jan Groover demonstrated that color and artistry in photography were not incompatible, an idea that was still debatable  in the 1970s.   In that struggle for recognition,  Groover's exhibition at the Museum of modern Art in 1978 was a milestone.  John Szarkowski, who curated the exhibition, wrote that "her works were good to think about because they were good to look at."    The public was dazzled and when Groover's forks appeared on the cover of Artforum, she was  vindicated.Groover studied painting at Pratt Institute, inspired by the works of Morandi, de Chirico, and  FraAngelicao, and the thrill of seeing Cezanne's painting of a lemon.  Around 1970, she turned to photography at the moment that a minimalist aesthetic looked fresh, after a decade of Pop Art.   With some success in New York under her belt, Groover received her first NEA fellowship  in 1978.  She bought a different camera anf tried photographing stillelifes of dried flowers but her efforts proved fruitless.  "They were disgusting" Groover later recalled. "You're having a hard time?  Why don't you go to the kitchen sink and take a look?' suggested her husband, the art critic Bruce Bois."So I did.  I was there for a long time, in one way or another, with those kinds of objects.  It was great.  I could deal with all the things that I knew about art."Things like foreshortening and playing around with space. In her kitchen still lifes, Groover reprised the history of photography, calling up the ghosts of such French masters as NicephoreNiepce and Dauguerre.The next year Groover began to work with platinum printing, a process used by many 19th century photographers.  Platinum prints were  known for their subtle tones, from silvery-greys to rose-browns, and were weel-suited to Groover's formal, restrained style."What does a lemon do?  A lemon lies down.  It can't do anything else but lie down.  an apple sits.  It doesn't lie down, it doesn't do anything but sit.  A pear lies down and stands up... So all these objects have these attitudes.  Now some objects have bigger attitudes.   An apple could have a big attitude, depending on what it sits with.  A lemon has somewhat of a private-language attitude to me because Manet did a beautiful painting of a lemon.  Then there are some objects like bottles that are containers, and its containership means something. ...So building up still life to have all these characters - I don't know what the sentences are, but I know the sentences make sense to me, when they make sense."    As for the plastic fish and little dog in the lower right corner, the viewer can only speculate.http://thebluelantern.blogspot.co.uk/2013_05_01_archive.html
  • Among the twentieth century’s most influential art photographers, Edward Weston (United States, 1886–1958) is widely respected for his many contributions to the field of photography. Along with Ansel Adams, Weston pioneered a modernist style characterized by the use of a large-format camera to create sharply focused and richly detailed black-and-white photographs.The combination of Weston’s stark objectivity and his passionate love of nature and form gave his still lifes, portraits, landscapes, and nudes qualities that seemed particularly suited for expressing the new American lifestyle and aesthetic that emerged from California and the West between the two world wars. He spent the years 1923–1926 in Mexico City as a part of an international milieu of creative minds attracted by the post-revolutionary excitement of political activists and artists such as Diego Rivera, Jose Clemente Orozco, Tina Modotti, and others. From the moment he returned to the United States, he began making work that would fundamentally change the direction of photography in this country.In 1932, Weston, his son Brett, Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, and a handful of other Bay Area photographers formed a group of like-minded realists who called themselves Group f/64, in honor of an aperture setting on a lens one might stop down to in order to attain the sharpest focus in a photograph. They introduced their work in an exhibition at San Francisco’s DeYoung Museum, and the exhibition still stands as a landmark in the history of photography. In 1937 Weston became the first photographer to be awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. He continued working until Parkinson’s disease forced him to give up the camera in 1948.
  • BishopLuffa GCSE photography exam support 2014

    1. 1. Time allowed: Preparation time + 10 hour exam (Controlled Conditions) Instructions •Read the paper carefully. Before you start work, make sure you understand all the information. •Respond to one question and produce a personal response. •You have a preparatory period to research, investigate and develop your ideas. Your work during this period could be in sketchbooks, journals, blogs, PowerPoints or any other appropriate form of preparation. •You are allowed ten hours to produce your personal response outcome(s). •The work submitted for this examination must be your own unaided work. •You must hand in your personal response outcome(s) and the preparatory work at the end of the examination.
    2. 2. Information •Your work will be marked out of 80. • All your work, including the work done during the preparatory period, will be marked. Advice • You should discuss your ideas with your teacher before deciding on your starting point. • You should make sure that any materials or equipment which you might need are available before you start the examination sessions. •You may take all your preparatory work into the examination sessions. • You should, when developing your personal response, make appropriate connections with other sources such as the work of photographers, artists, craftspeople and/or designers. •You may work on further supporting studies (between controlled conditions sessions) until you have completed your personal response outcome(s). •You may use any appropriate photographic medium, method(s) and materials, unless the question states otherwise.
    3. 3. Your work will be marked according to how well you have shown evidence of: AO1 Developing ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and cultural understanding AO2 Refining ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes AO3 Recording ideas, observations and insights relevant to your intentions in visual and/or other forms AO4 Presenting a personal, informed and meaningful response demonstrating analytical and critical understanding, realising intentions and, where appropriate, making connections between visual, written, oral or other elements. These are equally weighted And are worth 25% each. The whole of the exam is worth 40% of your final mark.
    4. 4. Openings such as doors and windows are important parts of the composition in some of the photographic work of Lee Friedlander and Andreas Gursky. Dragan Todrovic often uses the light that comes through doors or windows, to emphasise a subject or to create a silhouette. Research appropriate sources and produce your own work in which openings play an important part.
    5. 5. Lee Friedlander American, b. 1934
    6. 6. Andreas Gursky Paris, Montparnasse, 1993 White Cube Hong Kong Shanghai Bank 1994 C-print 220 x 170 cm 86½ x 67"
    7. 7. Dragan Todrovic
    8. 8. Inge Morath collaborated with the artist Saul Steinberg to produce a series of photographs in a book called ‘Masquerade’. These were based upon people wearing masks which had facial expressions drawn on them. Richard Burbridge has produced portraits for fashion magazines in which the model wears a surreal mask, often made from found materials. Photo manipulation using digital software can be used to alter features or to add to a person’s appearance or identity. Investigate relevant sources and create your own portraits which disguise or add to the appearance of the sitter.
    9. 9. Inge Morath & Saul Steinberg USA. Untitled. (from the Mask Series with Saul Steinberg), 1959. Photograph by Inge Morath
    10. 10. Richard Burbridge
    11. 11. Artists of the Futurist Movement sometimes used photography and film making to celebrate the energy, speed of change, technological advances and the power of machinery in the early 20th C. Research appropriate sources and produce work in response to one of the following: a) Working with today’s technology b) What a wonderful world
    12. 12. Futurist Imagery Polyphysiognomical Portrait of Umberto Bocciono’, Anton and Arturo Bragaglia (1913) Portrait of Marinetti’, Tato (date unknown) Typist’, Anton and Arturo Bragaglia (1911)
    13. 13. Natalya Goncharova, The Cyclist (1913) Umberto Boccioni, Unique Forms of Continuity in Space (1913)
    14. 14. Laura Letinsky uses the edges of objects such as tables and shelves and the line where one colour meets another as important features of the composition of her still-life photographs. Jed Devine and Jan Groover use similar compositional devices in their work. Lines formed by the edges of parts of buildings, shadows and silhouettes are an important part of the composition in the photographs and photograms of Laszlo Moholy-Nagy. Research appropriate sources and produce your own work where edges are an important part of the composition.
    15. 15. Jed Devine Jed Devine The White Jug (ca. 1984)
    16. 16. Jan Groover ‘Untitled’ 1987 NY Times Obituary
    17. 17. Laura Letinsky Laura Letinsky's photo for an article on fruit gelatin desserts in Martha Stewart Living. Untitled, #3, Hardly More Than Ever series, 1997 | Images courtesy of Yancey Richardson Gallery
    18. 18. Untitled #23, 2009 Chromogenic Print Untitled #34, 2001 Chromogenic Print After All After All
    19. 19. The London Festival of Photography defines Street Photography as, ‘ …un-posed, un-staged, photography which captures, explores or questions contemporary society and the relationships between individuals and their surroundings.’ It has been suggested that Henri CartierBresson and Robert Frank, amongst others, are Fathers of Street Photography. Research Street Photography and produce work based on your observations of individuals and their surroundings.
    20. 20. YouTube links
    21. 21. Henri Cartier Bresson & other examples
    22. 22. PES (real name Adam Pesapane) is an animator and director who uses the distinctive textures and colours of objects and materials in his stop-frame animations. In the animation ‘Western Spaghetti’, bubble wrap is used to represent boiling water and silver foil to represent cooking oil. Photographers such as Ansel Adams and Edward Weston have sometimes used close focus techniques to explore textures in the landscape and natural forms. Study relevant sources and produce your own work inspired by Texture
    23. 23. PES (Adam Pesapane)
    24. 24. Edward Weston Pepper 1929 Edward Weston (1948 film) YouTube
    25. 25. Ansel Adams Images from Adams’ ‘Yosemite National Park ‘ series
    26. 26. You should make connections with appropriate selected sources when developing your personal response to one of the following suggestions. a) Develop your own interpretation of the starting point Fragments b) You could make a poster by combining fragments of photographic images with fragments of lettering c) You might develop ideas by looking at the qualities of texture in fragments of rocks, wood or peeling paint.
    27. 27. Webology & Resources          Friedlander Dragan Todorovic Inge Morath & Saul Steinberg Richard Burbridge About Futurism Jan Groover Jed Devine Ansel Adams Edward Weston   Example of GCSE Exam process recorded as a blog Another example of a GCSE Exam blog

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