Making Connections in Common Core

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Designed to help educators understand critical components to work more efficiently when implementing Common Core. The critical components include the instructional shifts, text complexity, Standards for Mathematical Practice, Anchor Standards for Reading, and Webb's DOK.

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Making Connections in Common Core

  1. 1. 1 Making Connections in Common Core Elaine J. Roberts, Ph.D. ejroberts@p20partners.com
  2. 2. 2 Making Connection in the Common Core • Review – Literacy instructional shifts – Text complexity • Discuss implications of literacy instructional shifts and text complexity • Apply discussion to an activity • Review – Standards for Mathematical Practice – Anchor Standards for Reading – Webb’s DOK • Discuss implications of each of these Common Core- related elements • Apply discussion to an activity
  3. 3. 3 Literacy Instructional Shifts Increase Reading of Informational Text Literacy Instruction in Content Areas Text-based Answers Grade-level Text Complexity Writing from Sources Academic Vocabulary
  4. 4. 4 Literacy Instructional Shifts Increase reading of informational texts Students have the opportunity to read both informational and literary texts throughout the school day Literacy in the content areas Students are able to read, write, and build content knowledge in each domain Text-based answers Students are able to engage in rich, relevant, and rigorous conversations about text Grade-level text complexity Students are able to read at grade level and, through student-focused instruction, are exposed to opportunity to achieve proficiency and build towards mastery in all components of text complexity Writing from sources Students learn to use evidence from sources to inform, explain, support a position or craft an argument Academic vocabulary Students have opportunity to learn and practice academic vocabulary, and grasp application across content areas
  5. 5. 5 5 Text complexity is defined by: 1.Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands 2.Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity (word length or frequency, sentence length, text cohesion) Reader and Task 3.Reader and Task – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned What is text complexity?
  6. 6. 6 6 Text complexity is defined by: 1.Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands 2.Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity (word length or frequency, sentence length, text cohesion) Reader and Task 3.Reader and Task – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned What is text complexity?
  7. 7. 7 Literacy Instructional Shifts Increase reading of informational texts Students have the opportunity to read both informational and literary texts throughout the school day Literacy in the content areas Students are able to read, write, and build content knowledge in each domain Text-based answers Students are able to engage in rich, relevant, and rigorous conversations about text Grade-level text complexity Students are able to read at grade level and, through student-focused instruction, are exposed to opportunity to achieve proficiency and build towards mastery in all components of text complexity Writing from sources Students learn to use evidence from sources to inform, explain, support a position or craft an argument Academic vocabulary Students have opportunity to learn and practice academic vocabulary, and grasp application across content areas
  8. 8. 8 An accountable talk strategy • Ideally, groups of 4; no less than 3 and no more than 4 in a group • Count off at each table • Each group – Discuss identified shifts – Come up with 3 implications for one or all of the highlighted shifts – Think about the challenges for students and the challenges for teachers – Think, too, about how the shifts can work integratively • When I call TIME. . .
  9. 9. 9 x Implication #1 Content area literacy All teachers need literacy development strategies Text-based answers Ss need to be able to write and speak their answers, which means familiarity and comfort with domain content & vocabulary Text complexity Tasks need to support Ss content area literacy which can then supports Ss ability to provide text- based answers
  10. 10. 10 Literacy Instructional Shifts Increase reading of informational texts Students have the opportunity to read both informational and literary texts throughout the school day Literacy in the content areas Students are able to read, write, and build content knowledge in each domain Text-based answers Students are able to engage in rich, relevant, and rigorous conversations about text Grade-level text complexity Students are able to read at grade level and, through student-focused instruction, are exposed to opportunity to achieve proficiency and build towards mastery in all components of text complexity Writing from sources Students learn to use evidence from sources to inform, explain, support a position or craft an argument Academic vocabulary Students have opportunity to learn and practice academic vocabulary, and grasp application across content areas
  11. 11. 11Write down 1 or 2 text-dependent questions based on this graphic
  12. 12. 121. What economic factors contribute to a country’s literacy rates? 2. What are the economic implications of a low literacy rate?
  13. 13. 13 How might students approach answering the questions? How might your questions best leverage student learning in context of the shifts?
  14. 14. 14 SMPs, Anchor Standards, Webb’s DOK
  15. 15. 15 Standards for Mathematical Practice 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
  16. 16. 16 Anchor Standards for Reading Key Ideas & Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Craft & Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
  17. 17. 17 Integration of Knowledge & Ideas 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity 10.Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
  18. 18. 18 x
  19. 19. 19 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge Recall & Reproduction (DOK 1) Skills and Concepts/ Basic Reasoning (DOK 2) Strategic Thinking/ Complex Reasoning (DOK 3) Extended Thinking/ Reasoning (DOK 4)  Recall or recognize a fact, information or procedure  Perform a simple algorithm  Follow a set procedure  Answer item automatically  Use a routine method  Recognize patterns  Retrieve information from a graph  Make some decisions to approach a problem  Application of a skill or concept  Classify  Organize  Estimate  Make observations  Compare data  Imply more than one step  Apply reasoning, planning using evidence and a higher level of thinking  Make conjectures  Justify  Draw conclusions from observations  Cite evidence and develop logical arguments for concepts  Explain phenomena in terms of concepts  Use concepts to solve problems  Performance tasks  Authentic writing  Project-based assessment  Complex reasoning, planning, & developing  Make connections within the content area or among content areas  Select one approach among alternatives  Design and conduct experiments
  20. 20. 20 x
  21. 21. 21 x Implication #1 Content area literacy All teachers need literacy development strategies Text-based answers Ss need to be able to write and speak their answers, which means familiarity and comfort with domain content & vocabulary Text complexity Tasks need to support Ss content area literacy which can then supports Ss ability to provide text- based answers
  22. 22. 22Write down 1 or 2 text-dependent questions based on this graphic
  23. 23. 231. What economic factors contribute to a country’s literacy rates? 2. What are the economic implications of a low literacy rate?
  24. 24. 24 What economic factors contribute to literacy rates Content area literacy Economic factors Literacy rates Percentages Chart/legend Map: countries/continents Text-based answers The graphic itself Resources available to students or that they need to find to support their answers for specific tasks and clear learning objectives Text complexity Tasks of a graduated level to support learning objectives SMPs 1, 2, 3, [4], 5 Anchor Stds/Reading 1, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9 Webb’s DOK 1, 2, [3]
  25. 25. 25 How might students approach answering the questions? How might your questions best leverage student learning in context of the shifts?
  26. 26. 26 Farmer Fred x
  27. 27. 27 Farmer Fred x
  28. 28. 28 Farmer Fred x Examine the problem and your approaches to solving the problem in context of. . .
  29. 29. 29 Literacy Instructional Shifts Increase reading of informational texts Students have the opportunity to read both informational and literary texts throughout the school day Literacy in the content areas Students are able to read, write, and build content knowledge in each domain Text-based answers Students are able to engage in rich, relevant, and rigorous conversations about text Grade-level text complexity Students are able to read at grade level and, through student-focused instruction, are exposed to opportunity to achieve proficiency and build towards mastery in all components of text complexity Writing from sources Students learn to use evidence from sources to inform, explain, support a position or craft an argument Academic vocabulary Students have opportunity to learn and practice academic vocabulary, and grasp application across content areas
  30. 30. 30 Standards for Mathematical Practice 1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. 2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively. 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. 4. Model with mathematics. 5. Use appropriate tools strategically. 6. Attend to precision. 7. Look for and make use of structure. 8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.
  31. 31. 31 Anchor Standards for Reading Key Ideas & Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Craft & Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
  32. 32. 32 Integration of Knowledge & Ideas 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. 8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Range of Reading & Level of Text Complexity 10.Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
  33. 33. 33 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge Recall & Reproduction (DOK 1) Skills and Concepts/ Basic Reasoning (DOK 2) Strategic Thinking/ Complex Reasoning (DOK 3) Extended Thinking/ Reasoning (DOK 4)  Recall or recognize a fact, information or procedure  Perform a simple algorithm  Follow a set procedure  Answer item automatically  Use a routine method  Recognize patterns  Retrieve information from a graph  Make some decisions to approach a problem  Application of a skill or concept  Classify  Organize  Estimate  Make observations  Compare data  Imply more than one step  Apply reasoning, planning using evidence and a higher level of thinking  Make conjectures  Justify  Draw conclusions from observations  Cite evidence and develop logical arguments for concepts  Explain phenomena in terms of concepts  Use concepts to solve problems  Performance tasks  Authentic writing  Project-based assessment  Complex reasoning, planning, & developing  Make connections within the content area or among content areas  Select one approach among alternatives  Design and conduct experiments
  34. 34. 34 Making Connections in Common Core
  35. 35. 35 Elaine J. Roberts, Ph.D. ejroberts@p20partners.com Twitter: elainej Skype: ej_roberts Blog: www.irreverent-learning.com

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