It's not just lesson planning

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  • It’s important we’re all on the same page with terminology, and it’s important your teachers and colleagues are on the same page as well. Language as fundamental as this can get in the way if we’re not clear on what we mean and how we use these terms.We must constantly consider all of the elements that drive our curriculum. And every edge and shape of each piece must fit perfectly into the larger puzzle. Each of these components have important interconnectivity. In this lesson we’ll be focusing on the lesson and the events within the lessons, but we have to do so with the end in mind as we’re thinking about the unit, the course, the subject, and the overall curriculum.
  • With that in mind, we can more easily understand how we think about the elements of lesson planning. This WHERETO acrostic helps us remember what we can do to help our students can get where they need to go, and this helps us not only with lesson planning, but the larger design of the unit plan, too.
  • Now, let’s get to the key components of a lesson plan.The objective must be meaningful. Note that it is “justified in terms of past learning and student interest,” which reminds us the importance of considering our students and their learning. This is the W in WHERETO.Appropriate events. Look at the parenthetic of hook, equip, and tailor. Let’s think about that. We need to hook our students, think about what will engage them at some level. Then we need to equip our students so the learning events help them achieve the learning outcomes. But we also have to be prepared to tailor our learning events because our students are likely to be a diverse group, and the qualities of diversity may matter differently depending on the learning outcomes for that lesson.When using formative assessments, we have to know what we’re looking for; that is, we have to know how we’re measuring student success in their learning.Just as we have to be prepared to tailor or learning events and just as we have to have formative assessments to reveal learning difficulties, we have to allow time to make adjustments. It makes no sense to ignore problems and continue marching through the lesson plans.At the end of the lesson, we need to allow our students time to organize their thoughts. We should have some sort of summary or debrief and ways to create or reinforce connections to past lessons and/or establish connections for future lessons. As students have time to self-assess or reflect on their learning, the more likely they will develop the habit of self-assessment or reflection to help organize their thoughts and solidify their learning.
  • We know of the complex thinking contributes to rigor. Increasing the complexity of thinking involves many components. It’s not about making things harder. It Complexity involves three key components: course content, instruction, and assessment. We’re going to investigate each of these components to explore how they contribute to the rigor of teaching and learning. Presenter: Click once to highlight Content Acquisition with red box The first is content acquisition, or how things are connected that create a staircase effect of learning- steadily moving the learner upward towards the target learning goals.
  • By identifying the learning progression of the content, you are able to see where the required content and skills fit in the big picture of a student’s education. Presenter: You might just leave up this slide for the audience to see as you make connections between the bullets. You might need to spend a little time with “securely held knowledge” to make sure everyone understands and agrees with that phrase.The learning progression helps us focus on what students need to learn and know by the end of a lesson, by the end of the unit, and so on through the course. It helps us remember the big picture as we think about what students need to know and do before they come to our class, but also how this learning contributes to their proficiency, perhaps even mastery, of the curriculum.Transition Statements:Let’s think about this concept of progression as we look at our list of lesson objectives for one particular lesson
  • Here are some questions you might consider when organizing lesson topics and objectives in your units. Think about the coaching you might need to do with your teachers. What do think will be some of their questions and concerns? What do you think will cause them to balk or hesitate? How do you think you’ll be able to help them see the continuity of these questions and how this kind of thinking creates better continuity in their lessons?
  • Here are some questions to help you revisit the materials/resources as well as instructional strategies and assessments.
  • With that in mind, we can more easily understand how we think about the elements of lesson planning. This WHERETO acrostic helps us remember what we can do to help our students can get where they need to go, and this helps us not only with lesson planning, but the larger design of the unit plan, too.
  • It's not just lesson planning

    1. 1. 1 It’s Not Just Lesson Planning
    2. 2. 2 Welcome & Introductions Elaine J. Roberts, Ph.D. dr.ejroberts@yahoo.com Skype: ej_roberts Twitter: elainej
    3. 3. 3 AGENDA 8:00 Introductions/announcements/housekeeping What is “the end” in mind? Examine several lesson plan templates Discuss characteristics & components Identify the qualities most appropriate for the MHS students Examine those qualities for longevity 9:00 Breaking it down: How do we assess & apply the lesson plan components Webb’s DOK Big ideas Essential question(s) Criteria for success 10:00 BREAK 10:15 Elements of planning & Checking your work 11:30 LUNCH 12:30 Let’s talk about formative & summative assessments Planning for formative assessments: formal & informal Planning for summative assessments 1:00 Checking your work & reflection 1:30 BREAK 1:45 Implementing what you’ve learned 2:45 Reviewing “the end” & planning next steps Wrap up & dismiss
    4. 4. 4 WHAT IS “THE END”?
    5. 5. 5 The big picture • A curriculum is organized to reflect mission (e.g., critical thinking) and program goals (e.g., scientific inquiry). • These long-term goals are framed by subjects (e.g., science) and courses (e.g., biology). • Courses are composed of units (e.g., the cell). • Units are composed of lessons (e.g., plant cells). • Lessons are composed of events (e.g., viewing a plant cell through a microscope). • Events are composed of step-by-step actions and directions (e.g., procedures for focusing the scope and recording observations). Wiggins, Grant
    6. 6. 6 x
    7. 7. 7 Components of a lesson plan • Meaningful objective(s) (Where) – Justified in terms of past learning and student interest – Linked to longer term goals • Appropriate events (Hook, Equip, and Tailor) – Events to maximize engaged and effective learning – Mindful of student diversity • Formative assessments (Evaluate) • A plan to adjust (Rethink, Reflect, Revise): learning plans build in time for teachers to respond to inevitable student challenges, and unpredicted student interests and responses • Appropriate closure (Organize) – Lesson summary or debrief with links to past and/or future lessons – Student self-assessment or reflection x
    8. 8. 8 Thinking about rigor Rigor is creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels, and each is supported so he or she can learn at high levels, and each student demonstrates learning at high levels (Blackburn, 2008).
    9. 9. 9 Thinking about rigor Rigor is creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels
    10. 10. 10 Thinking about rigor Rigor is creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels, and each is supported so he or she can learn at high levels
    11. 11. 11 Thinking about rigor Rigor is creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels, and each is supported so he or she can learn at high levels, and each student demonstrates learning at high levels (Blackburn, 2008).
    12. 12. 12 Thinking about rigor Rigor is creating an environment in which each student is expected to learn at high levels, and each is supported so he or she can learn at high levels, and each student demonstrates learning at high levels (Blackburn, 2008).
    13. 13. 13 Evaluating some lesson plan models • Look at some sample lesson plans • Examine and critique components and characteristics • Build towards your model lesson plan template – Discuss characteristics & components – Identify the qualities most appropriate for the MHS students – Examine those qualities for longevity
    14. 14. 14 BREAKING IT DOWN • Webb’s DOK • Big ideas • Essential Questions • Criteria for success
    15. 15. 15 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
    16. 16. 16 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge with Karin Hess http://vimeo.com/20998609
    17. 17. 17 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge Recall & Reproduction (DOK 1) Skills and Concepts/ Basic Reasoning (DOK 2) Strategic Thinking/ Complex Reasoning (DOK 3) Extended Thinking/ Reasoning (DOK 4) Recall or recognize a fact, information or procedure Perform a simple algorithm Follow a set procedure Answer item automatically Use a routine method Recognize patterns Retrieve information from a graph Make some decisions to approach a problem Application of a skill or concept Classify Organize Estimate Make observations Compare data Imply more than one step Apply reasoning, planning using evidence and a higher level of thinking Make conjectures Justify Draw conclusions from observations Cite evidence and develop logical arguments for concepts Explain phenomena in terms of concepts Use concepts to solve problems Performance tasks Authentic writing Project-based assessment Complex reasoning, planning, & developing Make connections within the content area or among content areas Select one approach among alternatives Design and conduct experiments
    18. 18. 18 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge Recall & Reproduction (DOK 1) Skills and Concepts/ Basic Reasoning (DOK 2) Strategic Thinking/ Complex Reasoning (DOK 3) Extended Thinking/ Reasoning (DOK 4) Recall or recognize a fact, information or procedure Perform a simple algorithm Follow a set procedure Answer item automatically Use a routine method Recognize patterns Retrieve information from a graph Make some decisions to approach a problem Application of a skill or concept Classify Organize Estimate Make observations Compare data Imply more than one step Apply reasoning, planning using evidence and a higher level of thinking Make conjectures Justify Draw conclusions from observations Cite evidence and develop logical arguments for concepts Explain phenomena in terms of concepts Use concepts to solve problems Performance tasks Authentic writing Project-based assessment Complex reasoning, planning, & developing Make connections within the content area or among content areas Select one approach among alternatives Design and conduct experiments
    19. 19. 19 Essential questions • What makes a question essential? • Why is an essential question of value in lesson planning? • What are some qualities that mark an essential question?
    20. 20. 20 What is an essential question? An essential question is – well, essential: important, vital, at the heart of the matter – the essence of the issue. Think of questions in your life that fit this definition – but don’t just yet think about it like a teacher; consider the question as a thoughtful adult. What kinds of questions come to mind? What is a question that any thoughtful and intellectually-alive person ponders and should keep pondering?
    21. 21. 21 What is an essential question? An essential question is – well, essential: important, vital, at the heart of the matter – the essence of the issue. Think of questions in your life that fit this definition – but don’t just yet think about it like a teacher; consider the question as a thoughtful adult. What kinds of questions come to mind? What is a question that any thoughtful and intellectually-alive person ponders and should keep pondering? http://www.authenticeducation.org/ae_bigideas/article.lasso?artid=53
    22. 22. 22 A question is essential when it: • causes genuine and relevant inquiry into the big ideas and core content; • provokes deep thought, lively discussion, sustained inquiry, and new understanding as well as more questions; • requires students to consider alternatives, weigh evidence, support their ideas, and justify their answers; • stimulates vital, on-going rethinking of big ideas, assumptions, and prior lessons; • sparks meaningful connections with prior learning and personal experiences; • naturally recurs, creating opportunities for transfer to other situations and subjects. http://www.authenticeducation.org/ae_bigideas/article.lasso?artid=53
    23. 23. 23 Big ideas • What’s the a big idea? • What is the relationship of a big idea and essential questions?
    24. 24. 24 An idea is “big” if it helps us make sense of lots of confusing experiences and seemingly isolated facts. It’s like the picture that connects the dots or a simple rule of thumb in a complex field. For example: “the water cycle” is a big idea for connecting seemingly discrete and one-way events (the water seems to just disappear as it evaporates). “The heroic cycle” enables us to comprehend literature from many places, cultures, and times. “Measure twice, cut once” is a profound reminder about how to avoid heartache and inefficiency in building anything. A big idea is thus a way of seeing better and working smarter, not just a vague notion or another piece of knowledge. It is more like a lens for looking than another object seen; more like a theme than the details of a narrative; more like an active strategy in your favorite sport or reading than a specific skill. It is a theory, not a detail.
    25. 25. 25 An idea is “big” if it helps us make sense of lots of confusing experiences and seemingly isolated facts. It’s like the picture that connects the dots or a simple rule of thumb in a complex field. For example: “the water cycle” is a big idea for connecting seemingly discrete and one-way events (the water seems to just disappear as it evaporates). “The heroic cycle” enables us to comprehend literature from many places, cultures, and times. “Measure twice, cut once” is a profound reminder about how to avoid heartache and inefficiency in building anything. A big idea is thus a way of seeing better and working smarter, not just a vague notion or another piece of knowledge. It is more like a lens for looking than another object seen; more like a theme than the details of a narrative; more like an active strategy in your favorite sport or reading than a specific skill. It is a theory, not a detail.
    26. 26. 26 Any understanding, essential question, or transfer task is made up of a big idea; it is built out of it, in other words. So, making a question using a big idea turns into an essential question. A food chain is a big idea. “On what energy do we depend and how can we ensure access to it?” is an essential question about that big idea. While it is true that sometimes when asked to name a big idea we frame it instinctively as a question or a statement, sometimes we just express it as a phrase or word. http://www.authenticeducation.org/ae_bigideas/article.lasso?artid=99
    27. 27. 27 • What do you think you’d look for in a lesson plan for an essential question? • What do you think you’d look for in a lesson plan as a big idea? • How do the strategies and activities support student understanding/application of the big idea? • How do strategies and activities support student access of the essential question(s)? • When a lesson goes wrong
    28. 28. 28 A little more time with EQs and big ideas
    29. 29. 29 Criteria for success • How do you identify, describe, define, and/or explain criteria for student success for any lesson plan? • How do you articulate how you measure that success? • How do you make your expectations clear to your students? • What prevents students from understanding your expectations?
    30. 30. 30
    31. 31. 31
    32. 32. 32 ELEMENTS OF PLANNING
    33. 33. 33 Components to consider Instruction • Promoting critical thinking • Communication building relevance • Applying integrated ideas • Applying of concepts • Promoting responsibility Source: Adapted from Defining Rigor, Julie Edmunds, SERVE Assessment • Aligns with instructional targets (assess at the level to which you are teaching) • Enables students to demonstrate proficiency/mastery of the content/skills Course content • Content acquisition (learning progressions) • Appropriate leveled text(s) for challenge
    34. 34. 34 • Knowing what securely held knowledge students bring to the topic • Enabling focus of content for efficient planning • Knowing what teachers in the next grade expect of your students • Identifying related concepts at grade level • Clarity about the focus for each grade • Engaging in rich uses of classroom assessment Learning progressions mean . . . Another resource: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational- leadership/apr07/vol64/num07/The-Lowdown-on-Learning- Progressions.aspx
    35. 35. 35 Big ideas & essential questions • What, specifically, do I want students to learn from each lesson that will contribute to the students’ understanding of the unit’s main ideas and objectives? • Is each lesson developmentally appropriate? • How can I help students see the links between this activity and other lessons? • Do the lesson objectives clearly link to previous and future lesson objectives? • Is there a clear learning progression from one lesson to the next? x
    36. 36. 36 Creating learning objectives • Do you use clear action verbs in your objectives? • How do the lesson plan objectives contribute to the overall unit objectives? • Does the sequencing of your objectives and lessons make sense? • Will it be easy for learners to make the connections between lessons? • What is your plan for communicating these objectives in learner-friendly language?
    37. 37. 37 Can we talk. . .about Lexiles? • What is the Lexile range for your grade? • How do you ensure students get exposure to texts across the given Lexile range? • What other elements of the text do you consider beyond Lexile to choose the appropriate level of text complexity to ensure rigor in your classroom?
    38. 38. 38 Resources
    39. 39. 39 39 Text complexity is defined by: Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity (word length or frequency, sentence length, text cohesion) Reader and Task Reader and Task – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned Text Complexity: Appendix A
    40. 40. 40 40 Text complexity is defined by: Qualitative measures – levels of meaning, structure, language conventionality and clarity, and knowledge demands Quantitative measures – readability and other scores of text complexity (word length or frequency, sentence length, text cohesion) Reader and Task Reader and Task – background knowledge of reader, motivation, interests, and complexity generated by tasks assigned Text Complexity: Appendix A
    41. 41. 41 Questions to consider • Do you know the Lexile levels of each of the resources? • Are the Lexile bands appropriate for your students at the chosen time of year? • What other features of the text increase its complexity? • Is the text just outside of the students’ level of comfort to challenge but not frustrate? • How will you include a variety of texts (video, non-fiction, fiction, digital, etc.), as appropriate? • What support might students need to work with any text or resource? How will you differentiate? • Will you have a range or pool of resources rather than centralizing your lesson around a key text? • Will you have a range of tasks that could address the interest levels of different audiences? x
    42. 42. 42
    43. 43. 43 ASSESSMENTS. . .AND STRATEGIES • Formative assessments • Summative assessments • Role of performance tasks
    44. 44. 44 Performance Tasks Traditional Assessment Traditional testing helps answer the question, “Do you know it?” and performance assessment helps answer the question, “How well can you use what you know?” These two ways of looking at literacy do not compete; the challenge is to find the right balance between them Hibbard, M. (1996). A Teacher's Guide to Performance-Based Learning and Assessment
    45. 45. 45 Performance tasks. . . • Build on content knowledge, process skills, and work habits • Designed to enhance learning as students makes connections, “pulls it all together” • Integral part of learning • Range from short activities to larger, culminating projects • Larger projects can be the result of several shorter activities throughout unit
    46. 46. 46 CHECKING YOUR WORK & REFLECTION Where the rubber meets the road.
    47. 47. 47 IMPLEMENTING WHAT YOU’VE LEARNED
    48. 48. 48 REVIEWING “THE END” & PLANNING AHEAD
    49. 49. 49 x
    50. 50. 50 NEXT STEPS • Identify your 3 next steps • Explain why these are your 3 next steps • Establish a deadline for each of your steps • Remember the 80/20 rule – Of all the tasks performed throughout the day, only 20 percent really matter. – Those tasks in the 20 percent very likely will produce 80 percent of our results. • Discuss with others for accountability 80/20 rule aka Pareto’s Principle
    51. 51. 51
    52. 52. 52 It’s Not Just Lesson Planning Elaine J. Roberts, Ph.D. dr.ejroberts@yahoo.com ejroberts@p20partners.com Twitter: elainej

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