Vegetable Gardening Basics- 6-13-14

  • 103 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
103
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Know how. Know now. Vegetable Gardening Basics By: Elizabeth Killinger UNL Extension in Hall County ekillinger2@unl.edu 308-385-5088
  • 2. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Vegetable Gardening Basics  Benefits to Gardening  Methods for Gardening  Important Considerations for Gardening
  • 3. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Benefits to Home Gardens  Home grown produce  Quality control  Save on grocery bills  Grow unusual varieties  Fresh air
  • 4. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now.
  • 5. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Methods For Gardening  Conventional Gardening  Container Gardening  Raised Bed Gardening In Ground Supported Containerized
  • 6. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Conventional Gardening Disadvantage- Space requirements Uses the existing soil Accessibility Advantages- Deeper soil profile Moisture holding capacity Can be added into existing landscape
  • 7. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now.
  • 8. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Vegetables as Ornamentals  Tuck vegetables into annual or perennial beds or add them to a shrub border  Annual flowers can fill in the empty gaps from harvesting
  • 9. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now.
  • 10. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now.
  • 11. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now.
  • 12. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Container Gardening  Disadvantage- Containers dry out quicker in the summer months and may need more water  Advantages- Containers are filled with high-quality soil offers improved drainage and increase in yields Easier to maintain due to the smaller size Can be moved and placed on any flat surface
  • 13. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Container Vegetable Gardening
  • 14. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Many Choices
  • 15. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now.
  • 16. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Anything can work http://gardeninglandscaping.wordpress.com/2008/06/07/container-gardening/ http://www.ehow.com/how_5099905_do-container-vegetable-gardening.html
  • 17. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Container Selection Drainage Holes 1-gallon pot should have three to four ¼” holes Weight is important! Moving the container? Take into consideration the weight of the container, soil, and plants If at all possible….cheat!
  • 18. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Container Selection Clay Heavy, porous, and allow for excellent drainage and air movement Pot can dry out quicker- be sure to soak pot before planting Wood Should not be made from lumber treated with creosote Plastic Lightweight and can tip over easily
  • 19. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Container Requirements  Larger containers are needed as the number of plants increases.  Smaller containers dry out quicker and requires frequent watering  Make sure the container can handle the plant.  Large vegetables, large flowers, and ornamental grasses 3 to 5 gallon containers  Small flowers, herbs, and vegetables ½ to 1-gallon size containers.
  • 20. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Growing Media  Garden soil doesn’t work well in containers  A well-aerated, well-drained, lightweight soil works best  Potting soils or soilless mixes are good choices  A common mix 1 part sphagnum peat moss, composted bark, or compost 1 part vermiculite or perlite 1 part sand
  • 21. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Raised Beds Disadvantage- Elevated beds dry out quicker in the summer months and may need more water Advantages- Soil warms up quicker in the spring, earlier planting dates Beds are filled with high-quality soil- offers improved drainage and increase in yields Easier to maintain due to the smaller size Raised above ground level
  • 22. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Raised Beds
  • 23. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Raised Beds
  • 24. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Other Types of Raised Beds Photo from: http://progressivegardening.com/pottingmixalternatives.html
  • 25. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now.
  • 26. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Higher Yields  Increased yields / sq. ft.  Traditional = .6 lb’s / sq. ft.  Raised = 1.24 lb’s. / sq. ft. Slides courtesy from Sarah Browning, UNL
  • 27. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Better Soil  Amendments like compost and fertilizers are used only on the beds, not on the paths.  Soil can have a higher organic matter content  Reduced soil compaction due to reduced traffic
  • 28. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Ease of Maintenance  Less stooping over for weeding, watering, and other chores  Intensively planted beds have dense leaf cover and reduce weed growth  Beds can be covered with floating row cover to protect from insects
  • 29. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Improved Drainage  Improved soil quality allows for better drainage, especially important in areas with a heavy clay content  Plant roots are grown in an improved mix above water logged soil or areas with compaction.
  • 30. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Extended Season  Soil warms up earlier in the spring due to the change in elevation  Better drainage allows soil to dry out quicker
  • 31. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Using difficult sites or adapting to fit the gardener  Used in areas where gardens aren’t normally grown like on rooftops  Adapting the garden to work with a gardener with a disability
  • 32. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Types of Raised Beds  Raised Ground Bed  Supported Raised Bed  Containerized Raised Bed
  • 33. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Raised Ground Bed  The simplest form  Flat-topped mounds, 6-8” high high, require only additional soil.  Access areas around the raised beds are at least 24 inches wide. Image courtesy of University of Minnesota Extension
  • 34. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Photo from: veggiegardeningtips.com
  • 35. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Supported Raised Bed  Edging a raised bed places barrier between the garden and the lawn, the biggest source of perennial weeds.  The frame adds a neat, finished look. Image courtesy of University of Minnesota Extension
  • 36. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Photo from sunset.com
  • 37. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Containerized Raised Beds  Protection for plants in high-traffic areas near sidewalks.  Raising a bed to one or two feet can reduce reflected heat in paved areas.  Raised beds with higher than 10" to 12" walls maximize physical accessibility. For most wheelchair users, 27" is a comfortable working height.  Width should match the gardeners’ arm’s reach. Image courtesy of University of Minnesota Extension
  • 38. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Garden Consideration
  • 39. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Garden Requirements  An area that gets full sun  A source of water nearby  Good quality ‘soil’  Someone to eat the vegetables  A good attitude
  • 40. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Location  8-10 hours full sun ideal  Minimum 5 hours for fruiting plants, slightly less for leafy plants  Good air circulation Slides courtesy from Sarah Browning, UNL
  • 41. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Location & Layout  Consider the proximity to a water source  Stay away from marsh or areas that don’t drain  Consider ‘soil’ quality and proximity to black walnuts  Conventional Garden paths
  • 42. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Location & Layout  When it doubt, sketch it out or lay out bed lines in the site before installing  Orientation East-west has a slight advantage of collecting heat for frost protection North-south has a slight advantage of sunlight on both sides of the plant rows each day  Can be implemented in the existing garden design
  • 43. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Location and Layout Garden Size  What types of plants will you grow?  How will the produce be used? Fresh Frozen Processed Slides courtesy from Sarah Browning, UNL
  • 44. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Plant Selection and Layout
  • 45. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Selection Criteria  Days to harvest  Disease & insect resistance  Resistance to environmental problems  Fruit color, flavor & texture  Plant growth habit‘Early Girl’, Park Seed www.parkseed.com Slides courtesy from Sarah Browning, UNL
  • 46. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Vegetable Selection  NebGuides Available http:// www.ianrpubs.unl.edu  Other Resources Cornell Unversity, http://vegvariety.cce.cornell.edu All American Selections, http://all-americaselections.org Slides courtesy from Sarah Browning, UNL
  • 47. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Cultivar vs. Variety  Cultivated variety  Group of plants with distinct characteristics  Developed through human manipulation  Plant selection  Hybridization ’Striped German’ tomato Slides courtesy from Sarah Browning, UNL
  • 48. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Hybrid  Variety resulting from the cross of two genetically uniform varieties to produce special characteristics  F1 hybrid - first offspring, more vigorous  Uniform characteristics, higher yields  Usually do not breed true Photos: All American Selections ‘Honeybear’ ‘Lambkin’ Slides courtesy from Sarah Browning, UNL
  • 49. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Transplants  Good- broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, eggplant, lettuce, sweet potato, onion, tomato and pepper  Medium- celery, melon, cucumber, squash, watermelon  Poor- bean, corn, pea, okra Slides courtesy from Sarah Browning, UNL
  • 50. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Germination- Min. Soil Temp 35 Degrees Fahrenheit 40 Degrees Fahrenheit 50 Degrees Fahrenheit 60 Degrees Fahrenheit Spinach Parsnip Onion Lettuce Turnip Radish Pea Parsley Chard Celery Cauliflower Carrot Cabbage Beet Asparagus Corn Tomato Bean Lima Bean Cucumber Eggplant Muskmelon Okra Pepper Pumpkin Squash Watermelon Slides courtesy from Sarah Browning, UNL
  • 51. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Planting Dates
  • 52. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Planting  Consider size; compact forms leave more room  Very aggressive plants can kept from taking over the entire garden in containers or raised beds  Rotate plant families
  • 53. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Planting  Vine crops like squash, gourds, pumpkin and cucumbers can be grown on trellises, fences, stakes, or other supports  Place supports & tall plants along the north end of the garden Photo from garden-photos-com.photoshelter.com
  • 54. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Garden Layout  Row-style gardening  Intensive gardening Photo from: foodbanksofutah.org Photo from:bartlettpublishing.com
  • 55. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Row Cropping  Plants are placed in single file rows with a walking path in between  Works best in large gardens  Room between rows for tillers or other equipment ~18”  Space is taken up equally by vegetables and paths Photo from: foodbanksofutah.org
  • 56. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Block Style Gardening  Eliminates walkways  Plants vegetables in rectangular- shaped blocks instead of long single rows  Plant crops with an equal- distance space between neighboring plants in both directions  Hand weeding Photo from: http://cmg.colostate.edu/gardennotes/713.pdf
  • 57. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Irrigation  Overhead watering  Hand watering  Drip Irrigation  Raised beds have warmer soil temperatures and increased plant density and will dry out quicker than the surrounding soil
  • 58. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Knott’s Vegetable Handbook Rooting Depths of Vegetables Shallow 12-18 inches Moderate 18-24 inches Deep 24 inches + Broccoli Cabbage Brussels Sprouts Cauliflower Corn Lettuce Onion, Garlic, Leek Parsley Potato Radish Spinach Bean Beet Carrot Chard Cucumber Eggplant Muskmelon Pea Pepper Summer squash Turnip Asparagus Lima Bean Parsnip Pumpkin Winter Squash Sweet Potato Tomato Watermelon Slides courtesy from Sarah Browning, UNL
  • 59. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. References  University of Minnesota Extension, http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticultu re/M1254.html  University of Missouri Extension, http://extension.missouri.edu/p/g6985  Purdue University Extension, http://urbanext.illinois.edu/vegproblems/problems.cf m  Colorado State University Extension, http://cmg.colostate.edu/gardennotes/713.pdf
  • 60. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Know how. Know now. Extension is a Division of the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska– Lincoln cooperating with the Counties and the United States Department of Agriculture. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension educational programs abide with the nondiscrimination policies of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and the United States Department of Agriculture.