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Bed bugs: Oh The Places They Go. Head start 2013
 

Bed bugs: Oh The Places They Go. Head start 2013

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Presentation that was given for the Nebraska Head Start Association November 8, 2013

Presentation that was given for the Nebraska Head Start Association November 8, 2013

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    Bed bugs: Oh The Places They Go. Head start 2013 Bed bugs: Oh The Places They Go. Head start 2013 Presentation Transcript

    • Know how. Know now. BED BUGS: Oh The Places They Go Elizabeth Killinger University of Nebraska—Lincoln Extension In Hall County 308-385-5088 or ekillinger2@unl.edu http://slideshare.net/ekillinger1
    • Know how. Know now. Managing Risk of Bed Bug Infestations  Bed bugs, biology and behavior  Recognize signs of bed bugs, including bites  Risk factors  Infestation vs Introduction  High density housing/low income families  Travel  Action steps for dealing with an infestation and prevention:  Institutions  Personal University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. What are Bed Bugs? Biology and Behavior University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Bed Bugs  Adults are ¼inch long, wingless  Reddish brown  Flat, unless they have recently fed University of Nebraska–Lincoln Adults Unfed Recently Fed Immature Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Life Cycle  Females lay pinhead size eggs  Each of five immature stages must feed to develop  5-7 days to digest blood and molt  Life cycle takes 5 - 6 weeks with unlimited food University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Eggs are smaller than a pinhead Eggs are slightly sticky and adhere to fabric and wood Fabric fibers stick to eggs Eyespots University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bed bugs reproduce quickly…. Female lays 35 eggs each day and can live two months or more Spent bed bug eggs and droppings University of Nebraska–Lincoln in the crack of a sofa Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. If one female lays 3 eggs per day…. Even with 90% mortality…. After 6 months, there will be more than 16,000 bed bugs By the time bed bugs are discovered, they are usually well University of Nebraska–Lincoln established Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bed Bug Food  Prefer human blood, but will also feed on pets Bed bug feeding University of Nebraska–Lincoln Bed bugs inject anticoagulants and perhaps anesthetics before feeding Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bed Bug Activity Activity begins after people go to bed Senses CO2 triggers activity Heat sensors Human scent Several hours before dawn, bed bugs go back to hiding places Can be active during daytime, if hungry University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Mmmm… hungry anyone? First stage bed bug feeding University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. First Stage Bed Bug After Feeding Bedbugger.com University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Where Bed Bugs are Found  Hide in cracks and crevices near where people sleep  #1 location in a home: box springs  Sofas and upholstered furniture University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. “Nest” Parasite  Live in clusters  Bed bugs may attach to clothing or crawl into objects and be taken to other places Bed bugs in seam of sofa University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Signs of Bed Bugs Classic spots on mattress cording Box springs ticking Bed bugs produce an “aggregation” pheromone in their feces which attracts other bed bugs University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Live bug, cast skins, fecal drops, spent egg University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. More signs University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Large infestations: easy to find University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bed Bugs On The Move  When their populations increase and all the good hiding places are gone Seek better hiding places University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bed Bugs Also Move When…. Tenants move out and bed bugs become hungry  Some will stay for the new tenant Tenants sleep in other locations to avoid them Seek food when hungry University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Female Bed Bugs Move…  Mated females crawl into suitcases and begin most infestations Instinctive to seek new location University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bed Bug Survival Time  Bed bugs survive 4-5 months without food  VA Tech study using “resistant” bed bugs  At 78 degrees: no bugs lived longer than 3 months  Adult bed bugs survive longer than immatures  Actual survival time depends on humidity and University of Nebraska–Lincoln temperature *Benoit et al. Ohio State University Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bed Bug Bites University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bed Bug Bites May look like mosquito or chigger bites Often dismissed as something else Some people in the household may not react to bites University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bite Reactions*  Age 12-65: 20–25% did not react  No difference in ethnicity or race  Higher % of elderly did not react  >65 yrs: ~42% did not react  These individuals may not realize they have a bed bug problem *Mike Potter, et al. University of Kentucky University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. No “typical” bite response  Some persons may 2 days have red spots that do not itch  Most individuals have itchy bites  Small spots → hives  May be a delayed 8 days reaction, up to 3 weeks Difficult for health experts to diagnose bed bug bites University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bed Bug Bites  Don’t bite though nightwear  Bite locations are variable  More often at on torso and arms  Sheets may impede bed bugs finding a place to feed University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. More bites University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. So what’s the problem with bed bugs?? They do not transmit diseases. University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Psychological issues  Insomnia  Emotional distress  Anxiety and stress  May trigger delusory parasitosis Fear has resulted in unsafe use of pesticides and other chemicals. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Infestation vs. Introduction University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Infestations  Where people sleep nearly every night  Unlimited food → large bed bug infestations concentrate around the bed or where people sleep at night University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Introduction:  Where people don’t sleep  Scattered infestations of single bugs  Transfer locations when bugs become hungry  Schools, office buildings, doctor’s offices, hospital waiting rooms  Airports, buses, subways  Restaurants, movie theaters University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Risk Factors University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. High Risk Locations Where many people move in and out or live 1. Hotels and motels 2. Homeless and emergency shelters 3. Hospitals 4. Apartments, dorms, retirement homes University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. High Risk People/Families  Low income families or individuals who live in high density housing  Spread from unit to unit  Used furniture  Landlords not willing to hire exterminators  People who travel a lot  Business travel/truckers  Vacation travelers University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Places Bed Bugs Are Being Seen  Low income families  Refugees/immigrants  Subsidized housing  Retirement homes  Homeless shelters and halfway houses  Multi-unit housing for mentally or physically disabled persons University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Finding Bed Bugs University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Confirm Identification of Bug  Collect the insect   and properly store it as soon as suspected, don’t delay Take to Local Extension Offices or Health Depts. Control measures can be different University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg, C. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Inspecting Yourself University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Can’t find the infestation? You can hire a bed bug sniffing dog  Approximately $130 for a 1300 ft2 3 bedroom home plus of Nebraska–Lincoln University mileage 1 way Slide courtesy B. Ogg, C. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Or, Make a Bed Bug Trap  Flat bottomed pet dish, upside down  0.3 - 0.5 gallon insulated cooler  Talcum powder (baby powder)  Dry ice University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg, C. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Prepare the trap  Use glue or masking tape to adhere fabric to the outside of the pet dish  Provide a climbing surface  Dustofthe trap University Nebraska–Lincoln *Wang 2009 Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Fill your insulated container with dry ice pellets Open spout slightly to avoid pressure from building University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg, C. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Place the trap near bed/sofa and open the spout all the way  Set the trap when people go to bed or 10-11 pm  Will work even when people sleep in bed Check the trap in the morning University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg, C. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Dry ice  Dry ice is very cold (-109    degrees F) Can burn skin Keep out of reach of children Pellets bought in 5 pound bags for <$5 in Lincoln  One bag will fill two insulated .3 gallon containers University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg, C. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Notes/Precautions  Condensation-poorly     insulated containers Avoid using fan near the trap Well ventilated area Only use one trap per bedroom CO2 released from a 0.3 gallon thermos is similar to that of two people exhaling University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg, C. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Treatments: Eradication of a true infestation is possible, but is not cheap University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Hire a Pest Management Company for Best Results 1. Insecticides— several treatments needed when tenant cooperates • OTC chemicals are not effective 2. Heat treatments— non-toxic approach University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Chemically Eliminating Bed Bugs  Requires cooperation from tenant  De-clutter and simplify bedroom area  Vacuum HIDING PLACES!  Mattress encasements and interceptors  Launder bedding/hot dryer University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Heat Treatments: The Non-Toxic Alternative University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Lethal Temperatures For Bed Bugs* Adults: Eggs: 120 F 130 F Heat penetrates cracks and crevices and inaccessible hiding places *Stephen Kells, University of Minnesota University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Goal: to raise temperatures above 130 F and sustain for 3-5 hours Fans circulate air Seal doors and windows Heater University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Bite Prevention University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Bite prevention: mattress encasements and interceptors  Specially made and tested  May be more expensive than low income individuals can afford University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg, C. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Interceptors Bed bugs can’t crawl up hard plastic  Talcum powder as insurance Pull bed away from wall Use simple metal frame No bridging Climbup Insect Interceptors: Amazon.com University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Non-Chemical Methods University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now.  Vacuuming  Soft toys  Dryer for 30 minutes University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Reduce Clutter University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg, C. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Reduce Clutter  Bed bugs use clutter to hid in University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg, C. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Infested furniture? New Product: Hetta™ portable heating chamber  Portable  King-sized   mattresses and large sofas, recliners Books and electronics Expensive ($8,000) University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Sensors placed in insulated locations  Heats to 125 degrees F  Insulated walls do not heat room http://hettasolutions.com/ University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Personal Preventative Practices University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Travel  HEADBOARD!! Check behind it  Remove from wall  Remove bedding, look for fecal spots  Don’t put luggage/computer cases or purses on the floor University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. At Home Precautions to Prevent Bringing Them Inside:  Unpack outside or in the garage  Place clothing in garbage bags  Immediately wash in place in washer or dry (30 minutes)  Use duffel bags (can go through dryer)  Store luggage in garage University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Avoid used furniture, even if it looks good University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Be aware of visitors in your home Recent travelers Apartment dwellers or those who live in group homes  College kids University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. In the Event of an Infestation;  Work with a pest control company  Nearly impossible to completely prevent the introduction of bed bugs into a facility or home  Eradication is possible, especially in a controlled environment University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. When Bed Bugs Go To School University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Infested Classroom?  DO NOT PANIC! Bed bug numbers will be low….Infestations are uncommon  Mainly ‘hitchhikers’  Can be a pick-up hub for others  Determine the extent of the problem before treatments begin University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. What is That?  Proper identification of pest is crucial  Collect the pest  Record:  Who saw/collected the pest  Its location, both room and location within room  Date and time  Number of pests University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. If Bed Bugs Are On Children  Discreetly remove the child or belongings  Collect the insect for proper identification  Further Procedures or Policies  Notify parents/guardians  Provide information to everyone  Notify class University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Bed Bugs On Children  Ask parents about bugs  Some parents will be open about infestations at home  Others may be unaware of the infestation or reluctant to admit the infestation University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Next Steps  Isolate outerwear, personal belongings  Plastic tubs or sealed plastic bag  Change clothing  Washable items can be laundered  Washed and/or dried 30 minutes on high  Occasionally, bed bugs found in hair  Fine-toothed comb removes bugs University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Encountering Bed Bug While Working University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Preparing for Home Visits  Wear simple clothing that is easily laundered at hot temperatures  Avoid cargo pants or pants with cuffs  Avoid shirts with buttons & pockets  Wear shoes that can be thrown in the dryer  Limit accessories like scarves, jewelry, & purses  Shoes University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. After you Arrive  Do not sit on upholstered furniture or the  bed.  Glance at the cracks in hard chairs before sitting down Carry only items in that are essential to the home visit. Leave everything else in the car  Use a plastic clipboard to hold paperwork  Avoid placing anything on upholstered furniture, bedding, or on carpeted floors University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. If you discover an insect  Remain Calm!  Record infestation in your notes  Use a hand mirror to perform a self inspection. Check back or your pants, treads of your shoes, shoe laces, socks, cuffs, and collar  Place suspect items in a plastic tote  If an insect is found, keep it for later identification University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. When Returning Home  Remove your work clothes as soon as you come home.  Place clothes immediately into a plastic bag or into the washer/dryer  Clothes should either be laundered on hot or placed into a hot dryer for at least 30 minutes (including shoes) University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Additional Suggestions  Keep your vehicle clear of clutter, vacuum it weekly & inspect periodically for bed bugs  Keep a dedicated pair of shoes and/or jacket for use only in clients homes in sealed plastic containers in your vehicle  Provide information about bed bugs to clients. University of Nebraska–Lincoln
    • Know how. Know now. Action Steps:  Be Prepared: Institutions and agencies must have a protocol to deal with bed bugs in a thoughtful, but deliberate way  Reduces panic and reassures others steps are being taken University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. The Bottom Line….  Bed bugs are here to stay….  They are hard to get rid of  Eradication requires input from tenant or homeowner  There is no effective DIY approach  Professional treatments are effective, but not affordable to many  Low toxic methods are effective but costly  Simple precautions can prevent bed bugs, when suspected University of Nebraska–Lincoln Slide courtesy B. Ogg
    • Know how. Know now. Questions? Barb Ogg, Extension Educator UNL Extension-Lancaster County 444 Cherrycreek Rd Lincoln, NE 68528 402-441-7180 bogg1@unl.edu University of Nebraska–Lincoln Elizabeth Killinger, Extension Educator UNL Extension-Hall County 3180 W. Highway 34 Grand Island, NE 308-385-5088 ekillinger2@unl.edu www.slideshare.net/ekillinger1