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LIS2005 Final Project Report

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  • 1. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group ProjectPart 1: Information Type Our collection of information materials is comprised of different types of children’sdinosaur books. They are all print, physical books as opposed to e-books, websites, orother print dinosaur resources. They all feature dinosaurs in some capacity. Some arefictional stories with a dinosaur or dinosaurs as characters. Others are non-fiction worksthat give the history of dinosaurs, while other non-fiction works talk about fossils andpaleontology. We set the boundaries of the collection during the creation since there is aplethora of children’s dinosaur books on the market. We decided to have a narrow agerange and chose pre-school to kindergarten. Originally it was limited specifically to picturebooks, as in story books with pictures that an adult might read to a child, and non-fictionreference works, such as an encyclopedia of dinosaurs which would also be something anadult might read to a child. Later, once we had decided on our audience and created userprofiles, we expanded our collection to include non-fiction books that have an activitycomponent, such as crafts, games, or play-acting. Two important characteristics of all thebooks in the collection is that they would not be something a child in our age range wouldbe able to read to him or herself; however, they all include illustrations in some form,whether drawings or photographs, which children might be interested in looking at ontheir own. Along this line, we excluded from the collection easy readers, which areintended for beginning readers and include large pictures with limited text, and boardbooks, which are durable books printed on paperboard with little to no text and areintended for small children, typically toddlers and younger. Since we are all interested in working in libraries and two of our members plan onworking as children’s librarians specifically, children’s books seemed like relevant 1
  • 2. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Projectmaterials to organize. Working specifically with a print resource collection allows us togain firsthand knowledge of creating an organization scheme for the types of materials wecould be working with in the future. Furthermore, working specifically with children’sbooks led us to think critically about the types of user groups who might be interested inaccessing children’s books and what they might look for in an organizational system forthem. It also gave us the chance to work with some of the relevant library structures wehave talked about in our coursework, from metadata structures like Dublin Core tocontrolled vocabularies such as the Library of Congress Subject Heading and NameAuthority File. Also, dinosaur books are just plain fun. One challenge that we encounteredwas in creating a classification scheme. It was relatively easy dividing the books into threemain categories; however, the picture book category was difficult to sub-categorize, sincemany of the books had largely the same thematic content. This seemed to us a problemthat would be inherent in this and other collections of similar sizes. Creating aclassification scheme for a library collection might be easier since there would be a largervariety of items, with more categories, and potentially less overlap. Having such a smallcollection with very similar topics forced us to think carefully about the requirements ofhierarchical classifications when placing the books into categories.Part 2: User GroupsUser Group 1: Teachers Ms. Frizzle is a new preschool teacher. Though she doesn’t have an academicbackground in paleontology or evolutionary biology, she has been passionate about thestudy of dinosaurs since age 5. On her fifth birthday, she received a baby Komodo dragon,Igor, from an eccentric uncle, who convinced her that Igor was a baby Pinacosaurus. After 2
  • 3. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Projectcollege, she was lucky enough to get a Peace Corps position in Jurassic Park, where sheworked in a local school. She currently lives in Pittsburgh and teaches preschool. Ms.Frizzle has decided to start a dinosaur unit with her class and needs a variety of books thatshe can use in a group setting. She is concerned with accuracy and would like to be able toincorporate into her new collection recently published books. She is interested in anorganizational system that will be easy and fast and will help her find picture, information,and instructional/activity books.Ellen Frizzle: • New preschool teacher • Wants to teach a dinosaur unit and needs many dinosaur books • Needs picture books for story-times, informational books, and instructional books for activities • Needs recently published materials to reflect greater accuracy • Needs materials that must be able to used in a group setting with many kids • Needs an easy time-saving organizational scheme to choose booksUser Group 2: Mom is a quirky mother of two children. Her passion for the Beatles has pervadedevery aspect of her and her family’s life; for example, she dresses as a yellow submarineeach Halloween in order to embarrass her entire family. Her youngest child, Sally, hasdecided that “dinosaurs are way cooler than ponies,” and besides wanting a pet Diplodocus,she wants more and more dinosaur books. Cooper, Mom’s 7-year-old son has recentlymoved past the dinosaur phase and is now fully devoted to his best friend, Ringo, anadolescent Rottweiler. Mom is looking for new dinosaur books to share with her 4-year-old 3
  • 4. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Projectdaughter that will beef up their already existing collection of books she used to read withher son. Like Ms. Frizzle, Mom would like to be able to use an organizational scheme thatwill help her while searching the CLP shelves.Mom: • Parent with two kids (7-year-old Cooper and 4-year-old Sally) • The family already has an extensive dinosaur book collection, but they would like to add some new picture books • Wants to be able to find newer materials • Needs a time-saving device to help choose books • Needs books to use one-on-one with SallyPart 3: Collection Refer to the “Collection Description” worksheet in the Excel workbook for adescription of each item.Part 4.1: Descriptive Scheme Refer to the “Metadata Application Profile” worksheet in the Excel workbook.Part 4.2: Classification SchemeInformation Fossils, Bones, and Skeletons Inside-Outside Dinosaurs (Munro, Roxie) Jurassic Poop (Berkowitz, Jacob) General Information Did Dinosaurs Eat Pizza? (Hort, Lenny) Dinosaur (Lambert, David) 4
  • 5. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Project Dinosaur Parade (Halls, Kelly Milner) Dinosaurs?! (Prap, Lila) Nonfictional Story Jurassic Shark (Diffily, Deborah)Instruction DinoMania (Manning, Mick and Brita Granstrom) Dinosaurs (Morris, Ting and Neil) The Kids’ Natural History Book (Press, Judy)Picture Rhyming Concept Dinosaur Roar! (Stickland, Paul and Henrietta) Manners How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food? (Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague) How Do Dinosaurs Get Well Soon? (Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague) How Do Dinosaurs Go To School? (Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague) How Do Dinosaurs Say Good Night? (Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague) How Do Dinosaurs Say I Love You? (Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague) Poetry Dinothesaurus (Florian, Douglas) Tyrannosaurus Was a Beast (Prelutsky, Jack) Non-rhyming Difficult and Stubborn Dinosaurs 5
  • 6. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Project Dinosaur vs. Bedtime (Shea, Bob) The Dinosaurs’s New Clothes (Goode, Diane) The Super Hungry Dinosaur (Waddell, Martin) Pets, Helpers, and Friends Buying, Training & Caring for Your Dinosaur (Rennert, Laura Joy) Danny and the Dinosaur (Hoff, Syd) Dear Tyrannosaurus Rex (McClatchy, Lisa) Detective Dinosaur (Skofield, James) Edwina (Willems, Mo) Harold and the Purple Crayon (Baker, Liza) When Dinosaurs Came With Everything (Broach, Elise) While the faceted classification system is a lot more user-friendly when it comes tobrowsing, we used the hierarchical classification system because our collection is made upof books and we’re presenting the collection as if it belongs in a larger library collection.After all, in physical libraries, such as the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, books can onlyhave one designated place in the collection; believe it or not, books cannot exist in twoplaces at once! Also, the main goal of our collection is for users (especially the two usergroups we’ve described) to be able to easily search for the specific kinds of books they needand/or want. We started out with the three main classes (Information, Instruction, and Picture)because those are the three main types of books we were looking for when we werebuilding our collection. From there, we looked at the books we had decided to include inour collection and created the resulting subcategories from there. This strategy is quite a 6
  • 7. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Projectbit different from creating a classification scheme for a “normal” library collection becausefor a library, librarians have to consider the possibility of any book that exists or could existas becoming a part of their collection. However, our collection is small and ourclassification scheme solely exists for the included books, which means it might be verydifficult to add additional books into our collection’s classification scheme. Furthermore,when it comes to the most specific subcategories, particularly in the picture book category,they become much more subjective and open to the interpretation of whomever isorganizing and classifying the books. We did specifically cater this classification scheme to our user groups, thinkingabout what types of books they’re looking for and different characteristics of the books thatmight make a difference to them (when it comes to picture books, it is important todifferentiate between books of poems and story-centered books). However, I believe ourclassification system appeals to a much broader user group that includes all adults. Whileour collection is made up of children’s dinosaur books, we determined that because youngchildren would be much more likely to browse the physical collection in the library and donot necessarily have the needed vocabulary to search a collection’s database, it would bemuch more useful and relevant to target an adult audience rather than an audience of 4-and 5-year-old children.Part 5: Surrogate Records & Organizational Scheme The organizational scheme for our collection best meets the needs of our users. It isclear that each book falls into the three main categories in the classification scheme ofpicture book, instructional book, or information book. These categories aid both Mom andMs. Frizzle in navigating the dinosaur collection as a whole. The scheme only utilizes books 7
  • 8. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Projectthat are appropriate for preschoolers. Using this scheme, Mom will be able to choose booksto fill in the gaps of Sally’s collection with recent picture books. Ms. Frizzle can use theclassification scheme to find the books that will build the collection that she needs for herdinosaur unit. The descriptive scheme that we have identified allows our collection to be easilysearched, while providing a clear and inclusive description of the materials in thecollection. The metadata application profile (MAP) meets the functional requirements ofour user groups. We used basic Dublin Core elements to create our MAP. The Dublin Coreelements included in the metadata application profile were chosen to most accuratelydescribe the collection and allow the user to search by elements that are most helpful tothem. For example, “Type of book,” “Copyright year,” and “Subjects,” are some of theelements most helpful to Ms. Frizzle and Mom. Type of book specifies which books arepicture books, informational books, or instructional books; the copyright year shows whichbooks are newer (therefore have more current information); and subjects further specifywhat the books are about. The classification and descriptive scheme are designed to ease the search processfor our user groups. They will be able to chose the appropriate books for their audienceand group size. Though the needs of our user groups have been met, other user groups maynot easily be able to search the collection. If other children were trying to search thecollection for books to read to younger children or to enjoy themselves, the categories willnot be applicable. A potential problem in implementing this organizational scheme wouldbe making applicable to other user groups, or, as previously mentioned, adding additionalbooks. 8
  • 9. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group ProjectSurrogate records within the classification scheme:Information Fossils, Bones, and Skeletons Inside-Outside Dinosaurs (Munro, Roxie) Jurassic Poop (Berkowitz, Jacob) General Information Did Dinosaurs Eat Pizza? (Hort, Lenny) Author Hort, Lenny Title Did dinosaurs eat pizza?: mysteries science hasn’t solved Illustrator O’Brien, John, 1953- Publisher Henry Holt and Company, LLC Copyright Year 2006 Subjects Dinosaurs -- Juvenile literature. Dinosaurs -- Methodology -- Juvenile literature. Science -- Methodology -- Juvenile literature. ISBN 9780805067574 Type of Book Information Height 10.1 in. Width 8.1 in. Pages 32 Reading Level Summary Presents some of the mysteries surrounding dinosaurs, including such questions as what sounds they made, how they laid their eggs, how they cared for their young, whether they were cold-blooded or warm-blooded, and why they died out. Dinosaur (Lambert, David) 9
  • 10. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Project Dinosaur Parade (Halls, Kelly Milner) Dinosaurs?! (Prap, Lila) Author Prap, Lila, 1955- Title Dinosaurs?! Illustrator Publisher North-South Books Copyright Year 2009 Subjects Dinosaurs -- Juvenile literature. Dinosaurs -- Evolution -- Juvenile literature. Dinosaurs -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature. Chickens -- Origin -- Juvenile literature. ISBN 9780735822849 Type of Book Picture Height 9.6 in. Width 9.8 in. Pages 32 Reading Level Summary Chickens consider the possibility that their ancestors were dinosaurs.Nonfictional Story Jurassic Shark (Diffily, Deborah) Author Diffily, Deborah Title Jurassic shark Illustrator Carr, Karen, 1960- Publisher HarperCollins Copyright Year 2004 Subjects Hybodus -- Juvenile literature. ISBN 9780060082499 Type of Book Information Height 11.3 in. Width 9.3 in. Pages 32 Reading Level 10
  • 11. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Project Summary Profiles Hybodus, a fearless and deadly prehistoric shark, looking at her feeding habits, preparations for giving birth, and dangers to herself and her baby.Instruction DinoMania (Manning, Mick and Brita Granstrom) Dinosaurs (Morris, Ting and Neil) Author Morris, Ting and Morris, Neil Title Dinosaurs Illustrator Levy, Ruth and Crowne, Joanne Publisher Franklin Watts Copyright Year 1993 Subjects Handicraft. Dinosaurs. ISBN 9780531142585 Type of Book Instruction Height 10.8 in. Width 8.5 in. Pages 32 Reading Level Summary Provides step-by-step instructions for such dinosaur crafts as a tyrannosaurus hobby horse, plaster casts of dinosaur feet, and a flying pterodactyl. The Kids’ Natural History Book (Press, Judy) Author Press, Judy, 1944- Title The kids’ natural history book: making dinos, fossils, mammoths & more Illustrator Kline, Michael Publisher Williamson Publishing Copyright Year 2000 Subjects Handicraft -- Juvenile literature. Natural History -- Juvenile literature. 11
  • 12. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Project ISBN 9781885593245 Type of Book Instruction Height 8.5 in. Width 11 in. Pages 132 Reading Level Summary Arts, crafts, and nature activities explore various elements of the natural world, including ocean life, insects, dinosaurs, amphibians and reptiles, birds, mammals, and early man.Picture Rhyming Concept Dinosaur Roar! (Stickland, Paul and Henrietta) Manners How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food? (Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague) How Do Dinosaurs Get Well Soon? (Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague) How Do Dinosaurs Go To School? (Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague) How Do Dinosaurs Say Good Night? (Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague) How Do Dinosaurs Say I Love You? (Yolen, Jane and Mark Teague) Poetry Dinothesaurus (Florian, Douglas) Tyrannosaurus Was a Beast (Prelutsky, Jack) Non-rhyming Difficult and Stubborn Dinosaurs Dinosaur vs. Bedtime (Shea, Bob) 12
  • 13. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Project The Dinosaurs’s New Clothes (Goode, Diane) The Super Hungry Dinosaur (Waddell, Martin) Author Waddell, Martin Title The super hungry dinosaur Illustrator Lord, Leonie Publisher Dial Books for Young Readers Copyright Year 2009 Subjects Dinosaurs – Fiction. Dogs -- Juvenile fiction. Temper tantrums -- Juvenile fiction. ISBN 9780803734463 Type of Book Picture Height 10.1 in. Width 11.3 in. Pages 32 Reading Level 0-8 Summary Hal and his little dog Billy calmly deal with a dinosaurs monstrous temper tantrum.Pets, Helpers, and Friends Buying, Training & Caring for Your Dinosaur (Rennert, Laura Joy) Author Rennert, Laura Joy Title Buying, training & caring for your dinosaur Illustrator Brown, Marc Publisher Alfred A. Knopf Copyright Year 2009 Subjects Dinosaurs -- Juvenile literature. Pets -- Juvenile literature. ISBN 9780375936791 Type of Book Picture Height 8.6 in. Width 11.1 in. Pages 40 Reading Level 0-8 Summary Includes instructions for choosing and caring 13
  • 14. Group 1: E. Gehman, C. Morphew, M. Ross, A. Stapp LIS 2005, Jung Sun Oh, Group Project for a pet dinosaur.Danny and the Dinosaur (Hoff, Syd)Dear Tyrannosaurus Rex (McClatchy, Lisa)Detective Dinosaur (Skofield, James)Edwina (Willems, Mo)Author Willems, Mo, 1968-Title Edwina, the dinosaur who didn’t know she was extinctIllustrator Willems, Mo, 1968-Publisher HyperionCopyright Year 2006Subjects Dinosaurs -- Juvenile fiction. Identity (Pyschology) -- Juvenile fiction.ISBN 9780786837489Type of Book PictureHeight 9.3 in.Width 12.1 in.Pages 40Reading Level 0-8Summary Everyone in town loves Edwina the dinosaur except one little boy who is determined to prove to everyone, including Edwina, that dinosaurs are extinct.Harold and the Purple Crayon (Baker, Liza)When Dinosaurs Came With Everything (Broach, Elise) 14